Bring Order to Behavior Disorders Insider Secrets for Controlling Uncontrollable Students

 

school counselor blog


Bring Order to
Behavior Disorders:
Insider Secrets for
Controlling Uncontrollable Students

 

Some students' behavior goes beyond just being extremely misbehaved. Some students actually have mental health problems that are called behavior disorders.

Counselor training includes extensive preparation to manage each type of behavior disorder. That is why counselors can sometimes more successfully manage youngsters that educators struggle to control. Most counselors learn specialized behavior management tools tailored for each type of acting-out disorder. Most of these targeted tools work really well for educators too– except that educators are not normally routinely offered this essential training on behavior disorders.

While we are all aware of the hazards of labeling students, we have to have some shorthand to know exactly who we're talking about. If we didn't call a rose a rose, some of us might think Shakespeare was talking about dandelions. If we describe the flower each time, we can end up pretty confused, and long-winded too: "that red, no, I mean pink, no, it's white, no, it's a yellow flower that smells really sweet and may bloom all summer." So, as you read this article, of course you want to be sensitive about students being labeled, but hopefully you can agree that the use of common mental health terms will assure that we all know exactly which students– and which behavior disorders– we're talking about.

workshop trainer Ruth Herman WellsI'm Ruth Herman Wells, M.S., the Director and Trainer for Youth Change Workshops. At Youth Change, we firmly believe that educators and other non-mental health workers are smart enough to make those distinctions. This article will help you understand the categories and corresponding tools to use– or not use– with each type of student. In this issue, we will focus particularly on a single type of behavior disorder.

Unless you're a mental health professional, you can't diagnose the
disorders featured in this article. But you've never been able to diagnose other disorders– like ADHD, for example– but you most certainly have learned how to fine tune how you work with youngsters you believe could have that difficulty. Using that type of adjustment process of carefully tailoring your interventions without diagnosing will work for any mental health disorder that you think you might be encountering. While a diagnosis from a mental health worker would be incredibly useful, you can still work successfully with severely unmanageable youngsters either way.

There are two major mental health disorders that characterize the most extremely misbehaved students. Some youngsters have Oppositional-Defiant Disorder. That is a mental health diagnosis that describes kids that have consciences but sometimes act like they don't. This diagnosis can only be applied by a mental health professional but will be very important for any youth worker to know about and understand. This diagnosis is far more hopeful than the second disorder, "Conduct Disorder," which means the child lacks a conscience and a real capacity for relationships. While the oppositional-defiant child (ODD) may also appear to have little
conscience or relationship capacity, you may be able to improve that
difficulty with the right approach and methods. With conduct disorder (CD), such improvement isn't possible.
 

Understanding Oppositional Defiant Disorder & Conduct Disorder


WHAT DOES OPPOSITIONAL-DEFIANT DISORDER LOOK LIKE?

Oppositional-defiant kids are often some of your most misbehaved students. They may disrupt your class, hurt others, defy authority and engage in illegal or problematic conduct. Though students with ODD may look similar to conduct disorders, their bad behavior is usually less severe, less frequent, and of shorter duration. The ODD label is often inaccurately applied as this dynamic can be a difficult concept to grasp and apply correctly. Because many mental health professionals understandably hesitate to assign the heavy-duty conduct disorder label, they sometimes use the diagnosis of ODD as kind of a parking spot. This convention results in people using methods for ODD with conduct disordered youngsters who would have potentially benefitted from methods for CDs instead. CDs will be adversely affected and poorly managed by the use of strategies designed for students with ODD. In this issue, we are focusing on strategies for children and teens who appear to have ODD.


THE 3 AREAS OF HELP FOR ODD YOUTH

To help the child with ODD, you must focus on:

  1. Skill building
  2. "Pulling up" that conscience– example strategies are below
  3. Improving their relationship skills.


For skill building, teaching them how to regulate their anger, actions, peer skills, verbal output, etc. will be critical. (Note that CDs benefit from this training as well.) But equally important, the child with ODD must be aided to care about others, and to be guided more by conscience. (Note that CDs almost never benefit from this type of aid, and usually become more out-of-control as they assume the adult has "no clue" if they are using methods that involve utterly foreign and irrelevant concepts like conscience, remorse, guilt, and trust.)

In our workshops, we give dozens of effective interventions for stimulating the conscience of children and teens who evidence ODD. We will supply a
few of the best here. These interventions will only focus on stimulating that conscience or "compensating" for it. If you want more than the handful of ideas given here, or you want to see how to build skills and relationship capacity– those other two key intervention areas for students who evidence ODD– consider signing up for our live or online distance learning workshop, or purchasing some of our books that will deliver hundreds of the solutions you need.


STRATEGIES TO STIMULATE OR SIMULATE THE CONSCIENCE

for Students Who Appear to Have ODD

You can use these methods with or without the diagnosis. Remember that these interventions must be combined with the other key focus areas for students with ODD: skill training and relationship training. Also, remember these methods are not appropriate for use with that other type of very misbehaved youngster, children with conduct disorder.

 

STRATEGY #1

Before a child undertakes a problem behavior, ask the youth to imagine that s/he will read about that act on the cover of the local newspaper
in the morning. Ask the child their reaction. If they say that they wouldn't want to read about it in the newspaper the next morning, then you can say "Then don't do it!" This image makes a fast and easy guide for kids to follow to evaluate whether or not to do questionable behaviors. This intervention is a good choice to use with children whose conscience provides little guidance.

 

STRATEGY #2

This intervention can be used before or after the child has engaged in
misbehavior. For example, let's say the child has stolen the teacher's pen, you can say "I want you to imagine that we're making a video about your life. Are you impressed?" That uncomfortable sensation that the child may have in reaction to this intervention may be the conscience stirring.

 

STRATEGY #3

After the child has engaged in a problem behavior, such as stealing a pen, as in the example above, ask the child, "So what's your integrity worth to you?"

 

STRATEGY #4

To adapt the intervention shown above for young children, simply rephrase the question to "So what's people believing in you, worth to you?" Or, rephrase it to "So what's people trusting you, worth to you?"

 

STRATEGY #5

Have students list problem behaviors, and write their responses in a column on a board. Next, in a second column, have them list the most likely consequences of each behavior. Inform students that they can no longer say "I didn't know what was going to happen next," or make similar disclaimers because they have just shown they can make good guesses to predict the future. This strategy is another substitute for the conscience  as students can "guess ahead" before choosing to engage in problem behaviors.

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


School Skills Training 101 How to Be a Student: The Most Important Class That Schools Never Offer

 

classroom management blog


School Skills Training 101
How to Be a Student:
The Most Important Class
That Schools Never Offer

 


workshop trainer Ruth Herman WellsThere could almost be a sign hanging on the front door of your school: "Students Wanted: No Training Provided."

I'm Youth Change Workshop's Director, Ruth Herman Wells. As a staff trainer who has led professional development workshops in every corner of North America, I have to say that very few school districts have a formal plan to train kids to become successful students. Years ago, parents routinely taught their offspring to look, act, and sound like students. Now, many families can't or won't give their children the motivation, attitudes, and specific School Skills they need to succeed in school. For all the research, fads, opinions, debates, and testing, this is the elephant in the classroom– that School Behavior Skills are universally expected but seldom taught.

It doesn't take years of research to determine that it is probably completely unrealistic to expect children to perform tasks they've never been taught. Schools expect a wide range of skills from students, from attendance and punctuality to recognizing the value of education, from showing respect for the teacher to wearing appropriate attire, from chair-sitting skills to homework management skills, and from class discussion skills to interacting with peers.

Can you imagine what would happen if schools expected students to know academic skills that were never taught? A plan like that could only end in disaster– but everyday, teachers expect children to use School Skills that they were never taught. Unsurprisingly, many youngsters fail to perform these untaught skills, and that is a big part of why there are so many  serious, persistent behavior problems in today's schools. Having never been taught essential School Skills, it is inevitable that violence, bullying, work refusal, tardiness, dropping out, truancy, disrespect, and misconduct dominate many classrooms and campuses.

If schools did teach kids School Skills, what would it look like? Below is a quick glimpse of School Skills Training 101: How to Be a Student, the most important class that schools never offer.


Teach
School Skills
BEHAVIORS

Have you ever stopped to consider the massive number of skills kids are expected to have in order to become successful students? They must arrive on time, hear the homework assignment, bring required school supplies, raise their hands to be called on, maintain focus, and take tests and quizzes. That long list is just a fraction of the key skills students need to succeed, so you may wonder where do you begin to train kids to be students. You can start anywhere you want. Whether talk-outs or  disrespect or tardiness is your top concern, it's fine to start there. Ideally, there would be a formal game plan for Pre-K through Grade 12, so the training would be more systematic, but in the meantime, start with whatever skills are most critical to you to successfully teach. Here is an example of one school district's Pre-K through Grade 12 School Skills Training Curriculum plan.
 

 

Teach
School Skills
MOTIVATION


Whenever I train teachers and principals, there often seems to be a bit of a sense of resignation about the apathy and disinterest many students evidence, almost a "there's nothing that can be done" reaction. While most educators may never have been offered extensive training to discover effective strategies to motivate very unmotivated students, powerful, compelling interventions do exist to turnaround the rampant apathy and disinterest. Stop and think about how different your students might be if they saw the tremendous value of education. Motivation– or the lack of– underlies almost everything you attempt to accomplish with students. Talking alone probably won't improve the problem. You must choose interventions that are lively and so attention-grabbing that they can compete with cell phones, video games, TV, movies, and all the other contemporary attractions that vie for your students' attention. Our posters give you an instant look at our lively motivational methods.


Teach
School Skills
ATTITUDE

motivational poster 143Just as many educators appear resigned to their students' lack of motivation, many also seem resigned to the negative attitudes that are
equally common. Like motivation, students' attitudes color every activity you attempt to do with them. Like motivation, if the students' attitudes were improved, that improvement would have positive impact on all aspects of education because the youngsters would be so transformed. Despite the huge impact of students' attitudes, few schools have any formal plan to address the negativity, and few educators have received any practical training to learn specific strategies to engender more positive outlooks. That omission from educator training is truly discouraging, because so many forceful, effective intervention strategies exist to help students have more positive attitudes about school and education. Yes, bad attitudes may be commonplace now, but they don't have to be commonplace tomorrow. Pictured above is just one intervention (Poster #143) from our collection of hundreds. These potent, unexpected strategies are especially designed to work with resistant, oppositional students, and to work when more conventional methods would fail. Obviously, no single intervention will reverse the negativity, but this sample strategy does provide a great example of the powerful attitude adjustment methods that exist but unfortunately, may not be in wide use.

 

Teach
School Skills
HOW AND WHEN TO TEACH

Studies suggest that the typical teacher loses 22 minutes per hour to on-demand behavior management. That is a loss of several hours per day. School Skills Training instruction requires just minutes per day but can give you back so many of those lost 22 minutes per class period in return. Some teachers set aside a block of time each day, others take just 5 minutes at the start of each class. It doesn't matter how you structure the training, so long as you offer the training pro-actively. No longer are you vulnerable to students' misbehavior because you have thoroughly and systematically taught your youngsters to look, act, and sound like students. They can become veterans at managing the behaviors, attitudes, and motivation they've previously struggled with. It's your choice: You can continue to work with untrained, unmotivated students who evidence bad attitudes, or you can turn all that around with School Skills Training, and as an added bonus start to love your job again.

The U.S. education system is perpetually stuck, darting from trend to trend, while enmeshed in unhealthy, distracting politics and high-stakes testing. A common sense, real-world approach like School Skills Training could solve a lot of what's wrong with K-12 education, but since School Skills Training can't be described in a quick sound bite, isn't a new educational fad, isn't politically connected, and has nothing to do with testing, it probably doesn't have much of a chance of ever gaining widespread national notice. That shouldn't stop you from using School Skills Training to transform your classroom and school.

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    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Human Pressure Cookers: If Anguish Turns Violent Do You Know What to Do?

 

school discipline blog for teachers


Human Pressure Cookers
If Anguish Turns Violent
Do You Know What to Do?

 


workshop trainer Ruth Herman WellsIn 2005, annual state-wide testing in Texas included
an essay section. Of the one million essays submitted, nearly 700 youngsters wrote about their own abuse, neglect or rape (USA Today, March 28, 2005). Around the same time, The New York Times suggested that a recent Minnesota school shooting may have occurred because "anguish turned homicidal." In the next sentence, they wrote: "Teachers are ill-prepared to identify and address the normal emotional difficulties of their students, much less the aberrational ones." Further, they correctly observe that "school counselors, who are better suited for the task, are severely outnumbered."

Those words from 2005 carry even more weight 6 years later as counselors are often among the first staff jettisoned in the ubiquitous layoffs of our current difficult economic times.

For more than two decades, I have criss-crossed North America training teachers, counselors, principals and other youth workers to better understand and assist troubled youth and children. I'm Ruth Herman Wells, M.S., Director of Youth Change. For all those years, I have been saying over and over, in school after school, in city after city, that anguish can easily become rage.

However, the media continues to simplistically lump together all students who engage in serious school violence such as school shootings, and repeatedly names bullying as the sole cause of the extreme behavior. That over-simplified sound bite has made my job much harder because bullying is often not the sole– or even primary– contributing force that spurred tragedy.

The central force was the developing rage and on-going depression. The
simplistic focus on bullying means that quiet anguish that doesn't involve bullying, can more easily pass unnoticed by adults and any opportunity for prevention is lost. It is very discouraging that in my workshops, most teachers, principals, counselors, and other youth workers do cite bullying as the main cause of school shootings. In the 2005 Minnesota case, the young shooter was a pressure cooker. The signs of depression, alienation and frustration were there to see; and bullying may not have been a factor at all.

It is time for youth professionals to refine how they view school shooters. By subscribing to media characterizations that over-emphasize bullying, youth workers are more likely to miss the most important clues: depression, anguish and frustration. These powerhouse emotions can easily occur without any bullying.

If you want to become better prepared to notice and understand youngsters who are human pressure cookers, there is only one option. If your background does not include mental health basics, now is the time to upgrade your skills. Concern about a potential tragedy at your site is not the sole reason that non-mental health workers must finally broaden their expertise. The real reason that these youth professionals must become more skilled in basic mental health methods is that for every sad child who does pick up a gun, there are hundreds more who struggle and suffer more quietly. We now know that by 2005 there were at least 700 of them in Texas.

Children in Oregon have also confessed distress in that state's essay exam. Some of those sad stories lacked proper punctuation, or had sub-standard sentence structure, and ultimately received failing grades. A child tells of beatings or a recent rape, or writes of homelessness, or a lost parent. Not only will the cry for help fail to be answered, the cry for help itself is graded as failing.

In 2005 in Texas, a student died the day before the state-wide exam was scheduled. The school staff asked to delay the exam to allow the children time to grieve. The students were nonetheless required to take the test, seated next to the empty desk of their newly dead friend and classmate.

High stakes testing mania has become the center of the education universe. It consumes countless dollars, aggressively devours teachers' time, and diminishes the importance of every other educational activity. If a teacher wants to keep her job, she must produce the right testing numbers. With eyes firmly focused on testing, teachers are left precious little time to even think, never mind notice children's anguish.

Testing is most certainly not the cause of this country's problems with extreme school violence, but testing has most certainly contributed to the problem. Flunking cry for help essays, compelling testing even hours after death, and our relentless pursuit of magic numbers are just a few of the ways that we sacrifice children's humanity to the gods of testing.

If we put a mere 10% of the effort we devote to testing mania, into noticing and helping deeply troubled children, perhaps we could stop some of the shootings before they occur. Further, since you can't push profoundly distressed children to perform well on tests anyway, perhaps by noticing and attending to the distress, many sad children would accomplish more academically.

 

How Prepared is Your School to Notice and Help

Troubled Children?


How do you know if your team is properly noticing and helping distressed students? Further below is a quick litmus test to determine if your team has a solid, basic mental health knowledge base, plus the inclination and willingness to notice deeply depressed youngsters who might one day explode; brief answers are provided as applicable:

1. Can your staff name the 3 students at highest risk of engaging in
extreme violence?
Answer: Conduct disorders; thought disorders; extreme agitated,
depressed kids.


2. Conventional behavior management methods don't work with the
three students identified in Question #1. Does your staff know how they must intervene differently with each of those three types of students?


3. Can your staff name the symptoms of major, clinical depression, and the three methods that work best to prevent explosive rage?
Answer: There are a vast array of symptoms that can signal depression. While only mental health professionals can diagnose,
all youth workers can watch for sad moods especially without
apparent cause, diminished enthusiasm, anxiety, hopelessness,
feelings of worthlessness, helplessness, problems with concentration, changes in sleep, changes in weight, changes in
appetite, and suicidal gesturing or comments. These are a few
of the most common signs. The best methods to address
depression, especially with the help of your school counselor:
exercise, talking and carefully monitored anti-depressants.


4. Can your staff name the most important methods to use– and not
use– with conduct disordered students?
Answer: The single most important method is to keep the costs
of misbehavior high, and the benefits low. For diagnosed
conduct disorders, all conventional, relationship-based
approaches should be discontinued since they often make the
problems worse while failing to produce improvement. If you
have used conventional methods to rein in conduct disordered
students, you may have ended up feeling that "nothing works"
to control their misbehavior.


5. Is there a mechanism at your site or within your community to
ensure that all children are noticed by their teacher, mentor or other
adult so that warning signs (like violent website postings, essays
expressing distress, threatening remarks, alienation, and desperation)
are not missed?


6. Candidly speaking, what would your staff say is the highest priority at your site?
Answer: Academic achievement and high testing scores really
shouldn't be the top answer in our current violent times. The top answer offered by your team should be site safety, or else safety is not the priority that it must be in our current violent times. Educational goals will quickly assume lower status if your team ever loses students or staff in a shooting or other tragedy. School safety should be the one thing that is more important than anything else that occurs within the walls of your school. Without school safety, nothing else matters.

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    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


The Very Best Interventions for the Very Worst Behavior Problems

 

classroom management blog


The Very Best Interventions for the
Very Worst Behavior Problems

 


educational speakerEveryone at Youth Change Workshops is so excited that in January,  2011, our Director, Ruth Herman Wells was rated by SpeakerWiki as the #3 Elementary Education Speaker and #7 High School Ed Speaker in the U.S. She was also rated #8 of all Education Administrator Speakers. Ruth is known not just for her emotional, captivating speaking, but for her one-of-a-kind, unexpected behavior management interventions to turnaround the behavior problems presented by troubled youth and children. Here are some of Ruth's most popular, enduring, and effective classroom management interventions for students' bad behavior and attitude in school. Want more awesome behavior management solutions? Keep reading.

 

Me? Flunk English? That's Unpossible!

Just write this sentence on the board, then let the students discuss it:
"WiLl YOu RealY NevER ned a diPlOmA?" You may also repeat this exercise with this sentence: "Me? Flunk English? That's unpossible!" (The second sentence is from the cartoon show, "The Simpsons".) Ask your students to create other sentences like the two shown above. Also, you can ask your students to imagine how signs might be read by someone who hasn't learned to read very well. For example, ask them to imagine signs at the airport you better be able to read. They will devise many funny but provocative scenarios. Now that students see more value in reading and school, discuss with them how serious misbehavior at school keeps them from learning the information that they now acknowledge they need.
 

The Old Switcheroo Works Every Time

This is a very cagey intervention that reveals exactly who is the real problem. Make a list of problems that adults can have at work and in the community, such as "Mr. Frank is frequently late to work. Mr. Frank is angry at the boss for docking him pay for the time he's late, saying it is the boss's fault he loses money." Ask your students to determine who is accountable for the problem. Students will indicate that Mr. Frank is accountable. After the students determine adults are accountable in each scenario, present them with a second list of scenarios. This list should be exactly the same as the first list, but substitute youngsters for adults in each situation. Next, ask your group members to determine accountability. It may make for an interesting discussion, and provoke some new thinking. Few students will anticipate the old switcheroo. That's what gives this intervention so much power and impact. That's what makes this intervention work when more conventional strategies fail.

 

Live Through This– If You Can

Some students are very negative about school because they consider it to be a waste. Here is a fun intervention to show students that education may be essential. Have students write down the types of problems that an adult might have to deal with during one really bad day, then have them determine how many of these activities use skills learned in school. Your group will notice that education is needed to solve or manage all or most of the problems that happen to adults on really bad days. Include problems like the refrigerator is a bit warm, the car seems to slide for some reason on the wet road, and the bank says that your checking account is overdrawn.

 

The Texting Surgeon and the Distractible Pilot

Ask students to list their "dream jobs". Write the responses in a column on the board. Make a second column and ask the students to list problem behaviors that young people sometimes do. Include answers like swear, become distracted, and not follow directions. Next, draw a line from a dream job to a problem behavior. Ask the students to discern what could happen if the worker used the problem behavior. So, for example, what could happen if an airplane pilot didn't follow the air traffic controller's instructions? Another example: What could happen if a surgeon became distracted? Assist students to realize that problem behaviors can cause significant, even deadly consequences in many jobs, especially many of the jobs they describe as desirable. Ask the group to discuss how behavior problems at school will become behavior problems at work unless students decide to improve their conduct now. For students who say "I will just behave better on the job," challenge them to demonstrate those skills now by using only acceptable behavior for the next three months.

 

  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Stop Power Struggles Now: Fix the Nix-Master to Say “Yes” Faster

 

classroom management blog


Stop Power Struggles Now:
Fix the Nix-Master to Say "Yes" Faster

 


student who says noDo you know a Nix-Master?

Sure you do. It's the child who says "no"
to nearly anything.

Some of these children who engage in power struggles, are loud and defiant. Others are quietly and politely non-compliant.

Whether they're loud or quiet, they're not doing what they're asked to do.

No adult ever won a power struggle with a child, and no adult ever will.
The minute you get into a power struggle with a child, you've already lost.

Instead, choose interventions that work around the resistance. Nearly nonstop nay-saying is a normal part of development that prepares teens to become independent. Here are techniques to use with youth or children who evidence normal non-compliance, and those who use behaviors that go well beyond "typical" into seriously defiant:
 

Solutions for Defiance & Power Struggles
DISRUPT STUDENTS' BELIEFS ABOUT
DEFIANCE & POWER STRUGGLES

Defying authority can become the top issue above all else.

Strategies: Ask students to list the most important things they want in
life. Defying authority will not be listed. Identify to defiant students that
they devote much time and energy to low/no priority issues while
jeopardizing their top goals. Have students cross out goals that defiance
could ruin. This intervention is especially good with children who have
conduct disorder, and only care about what they get for me-me-me.


Solutions for Defiance & Power Struggles
CONVINCE STUDENTS THAT DEFIANCE
& POWER STRUGGLES HARM THEM

Help students realize that compliance is not arbitrary but essential.

Strategies: Ask the students to determine the consequences if
everyone was non-compliant whenever they wished. Ask what would
happen if everybody ignored stop signs, took every item they wanted,
blocked traffic, refused to pay taxes, or could enter your house without
your okay, or simply walk away with your cell phone or backpack.

 

Solutions for Defiance & Power Struggles
DISRUPT STUDENTS' BELIEFS ABOUT
DEFIANCE & POWER STRUGGLES

Defying authority can become the top issue above all else.

Strategies: Ask students to list the most important things they want in
life. Defying authority will not be listed. Identify to defiant students that
they devote much time and energy to low/no priority issues while
jeopardizing their top goals. Have students cross out goals that defiance
could ruin. This intervention is especially good with children who have
conduct disorder, and only care about what they get for me-me-me.


Solutions for Defiance & Power Struggles
CONVINCE STUDENTS THAT DEFIANCE
& POWER STRUGGLES HARM THEM

Help students realize that compliance is not arbitrary but essential.

Strategies: Ask the students to determine the consequences if
everyone was non-compliant whenever they wished. Ask what would
happen if everybody ignored stop signs, took every item they wanted,
blocked traffic, refused to pay taxes, or could enter your house without
your okay, or simply walk away with your cell phone or backpack.


Solutions for Defiance & Power Struggles
CONVINCE STUDENTS THAT DEFIANCE
& POWER STRUGGLES HARM THEM

Who would you work harder for– the boss who is a dictator or the boss
who is a participatory manager? Most of us, whether adults or kids,
want to have a say at work or school. Allowing youth input prepares
them for the self-management they must do throughout life when
supervising adults aren't present to provide guidance.

Strategies: To win a great prize, have students play Tic Tac Toe
without rules. They will discover that games won't work without rules.
Now, have a classroom without rules and a defiant youth as teacher.
Role reversals offer lightening fast ways for defiant youth to get a
jolting look at their own problem behavior. You're going to love the
results these intervention strategies deliver.


Solutions for Defiance & Power Struggles
IT DEPENDS ON YOU

Here's a fast device that will never let you down.

Strategies: When a student starts to power struggle, think to
youself:"Take my sails out of their wind," then act accordingly.
It takes two to power struggle. You can control one of the two.

 

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    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


School Skills Training: Better Classroom Management Now

 

classroom management blog

 

School Skills Training:
Better Classroom Management Now

 


Breakthrough Classroom Management workshop instructorWe've been hearing that a lot from weary teachers who are crossing the country to come to our Seattle Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop. Many of them travel in search of better classroom management. I'm course instructor, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S.

When lots of your students are disrespectful, defiant, angry, disinterested, and apathetic, we understand that you want help now, not in a couple months. While we can't pack all 200 interventions from our workshop into this issue, we're going to give you a few of our quickest, most innovative and effective classroom management improvement devices that you can use right now.

We always stress in our workshops that teachers should never assume that their class participants have any idea how to look, act, or sound like students– that teachers may need to teach that before expecting it. That's right. You need to transform kids into students before you are going to get the kind of behavior you need in your classroom.

We call this notion School Skills Training. School Skills Training techniques take untrained, unmotivated, uncooperative kids and helps them become skilled, motivated, cooperative students. You may find that this simple, do-able, time-efficient training approach will rapidly transform your kids and classroom.

Keep reading, and discover that better classroom management can start today.

 

Better Classroom Management Now


TEACH SCHOOL SKILLS BEFORE EXPECTING THEM
 

Improve Attendance and Punctuality


What You Miss Today Makes It Harder to Learn Tomorrow

motivational lesson planEnlarge the student worksheet shown in the picture for better viewing.

Attendance may be the single most important School Skill to teach. If students aren't in class, nothing else matters.

Years ago, parents routinely taught their offspring to regularly attend school. That is not as likely today. If parents aren't reliably teaching attendance, then you must.

Here's a sampling of the thousands of attendance-building teaching tools we have to offer.

This lesson plan and printable are called "What You Miss Today Makes It Harder to Learn Tomorrow." The intervention vividly and memorably convinces students of the importance of regularly coming to school.

It's just one of our endless supply of resources that teach attendance skills to students who are truant, frequently late, or missing part of the school day.

This lesson plan and worksheet are from our Turn On the
Turned-Off Student book (click).

 

TEACH SCHOOL SKILLS BEFORE EXPECTING THEM


Build Motivation and Enthusiasm for School


Even Rock Stars Gonna Need School

motivational worksheetSo many students believe that school is a waste. Fortunately, School Skills training gives you unexpected, innovative techniques to combat the
apathy and poor motivation that you see each day in your classroom.

You're going to really like how effectively this lesson plan and printable start to reverse student apathy.

The lesson is called "Even Rock Stars Gonna Need School." This intervention begins to debunk students' beliefs that they'll never need education because they're going to become rock stars, models, or sports stars. No single intervention can turnaround all the apathy and disinterest, but fortunately, we have thousands more you can use to finish the job.

The worksheet shows an injured star saying things like "I can't even balance my checkbook." Also shown: a rich, beautiful model is suddently disfigured by a huge mark on her face. A wealthy wife is suddenly widowed and broke. A rock star and others meet similar fates. You can ask your students to speculate what happens to all these people that makes school suddenly so very important and necessary.

You don't need to buy this student printable. You can make it, or use the information featured on the worksheet verbally. This lesson plan and worksheet are also from the Turn On the Turned-Off Student book (click).

 

TEACH SCHOOL SKILLS BEFORE EXPECTING THEM


Improve Negative Attitudes


I'm Not the Problem at School

student lesson plan lastch2bigpages_Page_2Students' negative attitudes can quickly create serious, chronic classroom management problems. While there are plenty of negative attitudes around, few resources exist to turn them around.

School Skill Training covers all aspects of being a successful student– even how to have a positive attitude about school.

Enlarge the pages for better viewing here.

This lesson and worksheet are called "I'm Not the Problem at School." This unusual lesson and
printable are designed to reverse students' negativity.

Of course, a single lesson can't accomplish all that at once, but hopefully this sample will get you off to a good start. If you need additional attitude adjustment tools, we may be the only place that can provide you with powerful, gets-the-job-done attitude adjustment resources.

This lesson plan and worksheet are from our Last Chance School Success Guide book (click).

 

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Back-to-School Strategies That Rule

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Back-to-School
Strategies That Rule

 
 

 

Back-to-School Strategies That Build Success


It's back-to-school time. This issue is filled with terrific back-to-school interventions to stop classroom management problems before they start.

Our new back-to-school ideas are crafted to work with elementary, middle and high school students, and are great for special ed students too.

The back-to-school interventions included in this issue work so much better than just re-stating the school and classroom rules. These lively devices actually teach kids how to be prepared, motivated students. Best of all, these intervention tools prevent classroom management problems before they ever start.

 

A Back-to-School Intervention to Teach
Motivation for School
WILL WORK FOR ELECTRICITY

back-to-school poster 149Poster 149, shown at right, can be used verbally, or put the message shown on the poster, on your laptop or tablet device.

You can add audio effects as well. This is a great intervention for elementary school students who may not read once you add the audio element.

 

 

 

A Back-to-School Intervention to Teach
Motivation for School
STAY OR PAY

Teach students that dropouts can afford 1/2 the house, 1/2 the possessions, 1/2 the necessities, 1/2 the fun that grads can afford. Ask students if they would rather "Stay or Pay," meaning would they prefer to "stay" in school or "pay" forever for dropping out.

For elementary school students, use toy houses or paper houses to illustrate the concepts, and do the same for the other elements too. You can skip this addition for middle and high school students.

 

A Back-to-School Intervention to Teach
Appropriate Dress
WHAT NEVER TO WEAR TO SCHOOL

Stop hassling with students about their inappropriate attire. Instead of reminding your students about the rules, actually teach them the skills they need to comply with your standards.

Ask your class members to generate posters showing What Never to Wear to School, and be sure they include tiny skirts, teeny tank tops, slippers, pajama bottoms, and pants that are way to big.

Post their art work on the wall so it becomes a lasting, vivid, concrete reminder of your standards. For the rest of the school year, no student will ever be able to say "But, I didn't know we couldn't wear swim suits to class!"

Notice how this intervention can work even when parents don't teach their offspring about appropriate dress for school.

 

A Back-to-School Intervention to Teach
Discussion Skills
WHAT TO SAY WHEN…

Don't just expect students to figure out the nuances of being in a class discussion– teach them those skills instead. So, have the students devise responses to situations that they are likely to encounter in classroom discussions.

For example, have students identify and memorize what to say when…they don't know what to say; they don't want to participate; they don't understand the question, etc. Post their responses on the wall so students can use the information all year long.

You may be surprised how much bad behavior can be avoided using this simple intervention all school year.


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Failing, Angry, Troubled and Defiant Students

1.800.545.5736 or email

Classroom Management Problems STOP here

 

A Back-to-School Intervention to Teach
Appreciation for School
FIND OUT NOW WHAT YOU'LL LEARN LATER

Students often see school as a waste of time. Show them that school is actually their key to survival.

To potently convey how difficult life will be without an education, give each student a page of text that is written in a foreign language that is unfamiliar. Offer each student a terrific prize for explaining what the page says. This will really motivate your class members to read the document, but of course, none will be able to.

Let your students vent about being very frustrated, feeling angry and incapable of completing the task. After the students have finished venting, note that this experience is similar to what life may be like without education.

 

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Public Displays of Affection: How to Escape the Hormone Zone

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Public Displays of Affection:

How to Escape the Hormone Zone

 
 

It's Spring. So, you're probably seeing way too many public displays of affection in your school. You may feel like you work in The Hormone Zone. Let us help you find a way out. If it is challenging trying to teach and counsel "hormone-poisoned" youth, here are some absolutely terrific interventions to help your teens use their heads instead of their hormones.

 

Methods to Manage

Teens' Public Displays of Affection

On-the-Job Kissy-Face and Coffee Breaks
When kids debate your site's standards regulating romantic contact, inform them that the standards derive from the work world, not your personal preferences. Advise your youngsters that as soon as business work places commonly permit hugging, kissing, etc., you will too. So, in our part of the world, we tell kids that the very instant that our large employers like Nike and Intel, start offering Coffee and Kiss breaks, we'll do it too. That should cut down a bit on the amount of public displays of affection in your classroom.

Work a Little, Kiss a Little
Ask students to name all the jobs they can successfully do and gaze longingly into someone's eyes while working; there may be none. Ask your youngsters to guess what happens– especially in a bad economy– to people who work a little, kiss a little. Also, ask them to observe for employees involved in public displays of affection in work places, like at a grocery store or restaurant, for example. Again, they will see few or none.

That Other Fire Will Have to Wait
Have your students name the jobs or businesses they may one day wish to do. Ask them to identify the results of kissing, hugging, etc. while working these jobs. For example, what could result from a fire fighter, surgeon or air traffic controller being distracted by romantic activity at work? Have students answer that question humorously by determining what the distracted worker might say when asked to concentrate on work. Elicit silly answers, such as the fire fighter responds with "That other fire will have to wait." Rely a lot on humor to defuse the tension around discussing public displays of affection with less than responsive teens.
 


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While Open Dates Still Remain

Learn 100s of Strategies for Work Refusers, Difficult,
Failing, Angry, Troubled and Defiant Students

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Classroom Management Problems STOP here

 

public display affection postersStop the Affection Connection
As you can see pictured in Poster #121, you can give a clear name to your expectations for social conduct. Inform students that your site is a "No-Cuddle Zone", and follow through on that standard of public displays of affection. That very humorous term will be far more effective than more conventional approaches; students will often begin to use the term themselves. To purchase Poster #121 or one of our other PDA (Public Display of Affection) posters, click here.

Teach the Rejection of Affection
Work with both partners who are involved in problematic displays of affection, and give them memorable, crystal-clear standards so that it is hard for students to even begin to claim that they forgot the rules. A very quick, hard-to-forget guideline for social contact at your site: Touch only from the elbows to fingertips, and only after asking.

In Case of Hormone Overdose
Years ago, families reliably taught their offspring what they needed to know about appropriate interpersonal social behavior. Those social skills are not always reliably taught at home any more. You may want to make it your job to teach what the family should have taught. Remember that telling youngsters "what not to do", may not be enough to change the problem social behaviors. Be sure to teach them "what to do" instead. Be sure to cover these social skills that are necessary to stopping public displays of affection: Hand Control, Mouth Control, Distance Control and Clothes Control.

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Pop Quiz: Are You Using Yesterday’s Teacher Training with Today’s Students?

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Pop Quiz: Are You Using Yesterday's Teacher Training with Today's Students?

 
 

 

The Obama administration has already begun questioning whether contemporary teacher professional development training sufficiently prepares teachers to best educate contemporary students. As one of the nation's premier providers of innovative teacher professional development, we share that concern.

At our workshops, teachers often express dismay that their training did not adequately prepare them to win the race for the top. We also hear a lot of comments that educator training prepares teachers for a world where guns meant water pistols and gangs meant West Side Story. Many of our course participants say that conventional teacher training is stuck in the past, with an all-consuming focus on content, testing and theory.

Since practical training takes a back seat to the theoretical, many teachers are left feeling unprepared to manage today's students who present significantly greater behavioral, emotional, familial and social problems than youngsters in the past. If teachers can't manage these huge contemporary roadblocks to learning, then training on content, testing and theory is somewhat wasted. A teacher fighting a losing battle to stay in charge of an out-of-control classroom isn't able to effectively teach content– never mind test students on what they've learned.

Practical answers geared to work with today's students can help. If you have attended our professional development course or closely followed this internet magazine, you may find that you do have the answers you need to win our 21st century race for the top. Here's a quiz to test your teacher training, and your readiness for the 21st century classroom.

 

Teacher Training

Pop Quiz
 

Questions:

1. Who is the hardest-to-manage, most potentially violent kid, and how must you work with him differently than everybody else?

 

  • Bonus Question: If you work with this hard-to-manage child using the same approaches you use with everyone else, what is likely to happen?

 

2. There may be just 3 major ways that kids can respond to adult directions. Name the 3 ways.

 

  • Bonus Question: What is the only effective way to get children to comply with adult directions?
     

3. Name the student most likely to drop out.
 

Bonus Question: What other problems will this child quite likely face?

 

4. Who are the kids at highest risk of extreme violence?

 

  • Bonus Question: Why do you work differently with each of these kids?

 

5. Other than violence prevention, name the single most important school readiness skill to teach to students. (Hint: Most schools don't have a formal plan to teach it, but they all require it)

 

  • Bonus Question: When is the time to teach this skill?

 


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Failing, Angry, Troubled and Defiant Students

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Classroom Management Problems STOP here

 

Answers:
Detailed, follow-up resources follow the Scoring section

1. CONDUCT DISORDERS
"Conduct disorder" is a mental health term that essentially means that the child is sociopathic. A whopping 11-14% of today's students may be conduct disordered vs 2-3% years ago.That means you have at least one or two of these unmanageable youngsters in your classroom. Conduct disorders can be the 1% of students who take 99% of your time. While you can continue to successfully use relationship-based approaches with any other child, these methods inevitably fail with conduct disorders who, by definition, can't relate normally to others. Use yesterday's methods with conduct disorders and you will quickly discover "nothing works."

 

  • Bonus Question: If you use conventional relationship-based approaches with conduct disorders, it conveys to them that you do not understand them. It may be close to painting a target on your chest. Actions that are normally appropriate under some circumstances, such as giving one more chance, can be dangerous– even disastrous– with conduct disorders. If you do not know this child backwards and forwards, you may lack key tools to ensure your safety and the safety of other children.

 

2. The child can become OPPOSITIONAL. The child can CAPITULATE if coerced to do so. The child can comply; that's ACCEPTANCE.

 

  • Bonus Question: Acceptance is really the only way to gain compliance. Power-struggling with oppositional kids means everyone loses– especially you– as no adult ever wins a power struggle with a kid. If you must hassle and harass a kid into capitulating, that is not a positive way of interacting that will work in the "real" world. Plus, imagine the harm you might do hassling a troubled child by coercing compliance from them. Acceptance is the standard that works everywhere and won't damage even a very vulnerable child while gaining their compliance.

 

3. TEEN MOMS
The dropout rate for teen moms is the worst for any group of students.
 

  • Bonus Question: Teen moms also have the highest risk of poverty of anyone, and have a high need for welfare services. Shouldn't every contemporary teacher know who is the one child at highest risk of dropping out, and be aware of the potential additional litany of woes?

 

4. CONDUCT DISORDERS, THOUGHT DISORDERS, EXTREMELY DEPRESSED KIDS
Note how this answer is far more sophisticated and complex than the simple sound bites you hear in today's media. If a contemporary teacher doesn't know what these three mental health terms mean, that is a big impediment to ensuring safety.

 

  • Bonus Question: Each of these 3 children needs a very different kind of help. For example, the thought-disordered child might be able to benefit tremendously from medication, while there is no medicine for conduct disorders. Here is the bottom line: To best prevent extreme violence with today's students, teachers must understand how to work with different kids very differently.

 

5. ATTENDANCE
If the student isn't in your classroom, you can't work your magic on them. Every school expects attendance, but while many sanction poor attendance, very few schools routinely teach basic attendance skills to students.

 

  • Bonus Question: Start teaching attendance skills on Day 1 of the school year. It's that important.

 

Teacher Training Quiz Scoring:

Score 1 point for each question or bonus question

8-10 Correct Answers
You're READY for the 21st Century Classroom

5-8 Correct Answers
You may be DUE for a teacher training update

0-4 Correct Answers
You may be OVERDUE for a teacher training update

 

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


The Worst Mistakes Good Teachers and Youth Professionals Make

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

The Worst Mistakes
Good Teachers and Youth Professionals Make

 

 

K-12 Keynote Speaker Ruth Herman Wells

Here are the two worst mistakes good youth professionals and teachers make. Since Youth Change is your Problem Student Problem-Solver, of course, we supply solutions you can use right away.

I'm trainer and author Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. with the answers that can help.


 

The Top Youth Professional & Teacher Mistakes


Feeling Discouraged About Overcoming Problems
There is no doubt that these are extremely difficult times to be a teacher, counselor or youth professional. You cope with the most serious student behavior, social and family problems that may have ever existed in our nation's history, and now you must also face one of the most serious budget crunches ever. You have twin battles to fight. We know you have to do more with less.

That is why we have started a free, fast weekly podcast called 5 Minute Classroom Management Fixes. It's a fast five minutes worth of ready-to-use solutions for problems like misbehavior, poor motivation, work refusal, bad attitudes and disruption. Listen to this strategy-filled podcast online here.

For additional help with both your behavior and budget problems, remember that there are thousands of other free solutions throughout our website.
 


Schedule Your On-Site Workshop Now

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Learn 100s of Strategies for Work Refusers, Difficult,
Failing, Angry, Troubled and Defiant Students

1.800.545.5736 or email

Classroom Management Problems STOP here

 

Using Yesterday's Methods with Today's Kids
So many terrific teachers, principals and counselors are still using old-style interventions with new-style kids. Older methods are often ineffective when used to combat some more modern concerns like gangs, serious substance abuse, extreme violence, apathy, and cyber bullying.

Here's a good test to see if you are using an out-of-date method for a youth problem. If the method was invented decades before the problem was, there is likely to be a mismatch. For example, combatting cyber-bullying with character ed may produce inferior results. Switching to more updated, lively, compelling contemporary approaches can enhance your results combatting contemporary problems.

To use apathy as an example, relying on an old-style approach like mere words to combat apathy is often insufficient. Using methods from the 1950s to combat 21st century problems is the equivalent of using a record player instead of an iPod. You can certainly hear current songs on a record player but is the best, most reliable way? Just as record players and iPods exist in different universes, atomic age student intervention methods may not be the best fit for our new millennium.

teacher poster 21Here's an example of an eye-catching, cutting-edge method to combat apathy. Contrast this method to mere words, and the difference in potential impact is obvious. This intervention is such a perfect match for these scary economic times. It is also our Poster #43, but you can just do the intervention activity pictured on the poster without buying anything. This intervention can also work as a handout.

 

 

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    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
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