The Five Fastest & “Funnest” Student Behavior Management Strategies

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

The Five Fastest & “Funnest”

Classroom Management Ideas & Strategies

 


classroom management help

classroom management help

classroom management help

 

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What kind of year will it be without our 200 problem-stopping strategies?

 


 

The Five Fastest & “Funnest”

Classroom Management Ideas & Strategies

classroom management ideas

Behavior management and classroom management strategies that utilize humor or fun, get the job done faster as students don’t normally become as reactive or oppositional to lighter, fun approaches. So, please forgive the bad grammar, but below you will find five of our fastest and “funnest” student behavior and classroom management ideas. Hello from Youth Change Workshops’ Director, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I hope you will come to Seattle in two weeks to get 200 additional innovative, more effective classroom management ideas and strategies when we host a general session of our Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop. Information on this information-packed classroom management strategies workshop is here. Register here and get a 30% discount when you use this coupon code: 30% OFF Seattle 2019.

 

classroom management strategies and ideas

#1. Silly Classroom Management Idea
       for Sensitive Topics

fast classroom management strategiesIf you know a topic is loaded with tension and emotion, that’s the perfect time to employ humor. The human brain has trouble holding two conflicting emotions at once so what typically happens is that the student will grin or laugh before the negativity kicks in. That brief moment of understanding the silly sign or poster, puts you one small step closer to perhaps ultimately changing attitudes for the better. Racism is one of the toughest issues to tackle because students may already have entrenched built-in bias from home or their community. That makes a silly approach much smarter than a more straight-forward one. You don’t have to buy Poster #668. Instead of buying it, wait for a time when you need a creative consequence for a creative student. Instead of giving a traditional consequence, have the student make a silly poster similar to Poster #668 that is pictured at right.  If you wish, you can print or display the picture of that poster for use as inspiration for your student.

 

classroom management strategies and ideas

#2. Silly Classroom Management Idea
       Help Students Follow the Rules

fast classroom management helpYou don’t have to spend your entire school year reminding students to follow your classroom and school rules. Here is a very fun and silly classroom management idea that tends to reduce the amount of reminders and sanctions you have to give because your students “didn’t know the rules” or “forgot.” Students will normally learn infinitely faster from an enjoyable game than from another lecture or stern reminder. This game is fun and even better, it provides a fast and effective way to help students remember and follow classroom and schools rules and policies. It’s called Classroom Excuses Bingo. To use this intervention, simply create a bingo card (or cards), and replace the letters and numbers typically found on a Bingo card with the excuses you hear from your students. You may want to have a few fun prizes to the winner of Classroom Excuses Bingo to ramp up involvement and interest to the maximum possible. Alternatively, ask students to design the Classroom Excuses Bingo cards. That task would make a wonderful alternative consequence for any student who has broken a rule or policy. If you want to see an enlarged version of this example Bingo card, click here to view our Poster #543

 

 

classroom management strategies and ideas

#3. Silly Classroom Management Idea
       Build Motivation for School and Education

classroom management ideaIn our workshop that is coming to Seattle in a couple weeks, we will spend hours giving creative, surprising and fun motivational methods for the most unmotivated students. One of our favorites is pictured at right. It looks like a lottery ticket but the text has been redone to make a complete eduction the ultimate prize. You can see this example enlarged; it’s our Poster #496. You can use a picture of Poster #496 as an example for students to make their own lottery tickets that promote education, or, you can discuss the poster as shown. Either way, you are going to be practically “sneaking” your motivational message into your students’ brains. Information presented in silly ways is just so much faster and easier to send and receive. You will see that for yourself once you try some of our silly classroom management ideas with your students. Plus, a side benefit is that it isn’t just more fun for students. Most teachers would much rather teach a silly lesson than have to give another lecture or consequence for some classroom issue.

Article Continues Below

 


 

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Now $119 for 2 Days, $90 for 1 Day

Coupon Code: 30% OFF Seattle 2019

Valid through 04-17-19

Register   Workshop Information

 


 

 

 

classroom management workshops

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Article Continues Here

classroom management strategies and ideas

#4. Silly Classroom Management Idea
       Address Cultural and Gender Norms

K-12 classroom ideasCultural norms and gender expectations are not normally very easy to rapidly change or improve. Many girls see STEM courses as “too hard” or “not for girls,” but STEM skills are likely to be the most in demand in the future. Lacking those skills will likely be a serious deficit. Possessing those skills will likely be a major asset as STEM careers typically pay more than many of the occupations viewed as “for girls.” This idea is perfect to chip away at the restrictiveness of gender and cultural norms that many girls may follow– probably without even realizing. The image at right is Poster #413. There are at least two ways to use this silly poster to start to change female students’ resistance to STEM classes. First, you can print a picture of the poster and use it as a discussion-starter. A second idea is to ask your students to make their own version of Clamor Magazine. This task can work really well to effect change because to make their creations, girls must be able to identify the restrictiveness of cultural and gender norms and their impact on assumptions and thinking. Having to create something similar to the example poster forces students to think differently than normal. That’s a great first step to help female students move away from some of the cultural or gender norms that may be holding them back from giving STEM classes more of a chance, and a bigger effort.

 

classroom management strategies and ideas

#5. Silly Classroom Management Idea
       Reduce Chronic Peer Problems

classroom management ideaIt’s spring. You know what that means: hormone-poisoned students who are more touchy-feely than you or your school wish. Instead of having to issue frequent reminders about your standards for contact, consider turning your classroom or school into a “No Cuddle Zone” and post appropriate signage. Now you have wall signs doing the heavy lifting 24/7, perhaps freeing you up to do more teaching and less reminding. An example wall sign is shown at right. It is our Poster #121. There is no need to buy the poster, just have one of your creative students whip up a few versions of their own. Creating No Cuddle Zone wall signs will also make a creative consequence for students who use problem contact in your No Cuddle Zone. The signs and the name make it difficult for students to say that they didn’t know that they were not supposed to engage in this type of behavior in school or class. The signs and the name tend to annihilate many of the excuses you hear all the time– and that’s a great result. So, stop battling students’ hormones this spring by employing some fun ideas to help them remember your class and school’s expectations. By incorporating some of these unusual, fun ideas into your classroom, maybe this spring, your students will be better prepared to focus more on the three Rs and less on PDA.

 

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    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Free Worksheets with Student Behavior Strategies

 

teacher classroom management blog

4 Free Worksheets with

Student Behavior Strategies 
 

 


classroom management help

classroom management help

classroom management help

 

expert classroom management toolsNext Live Workshops:

 

30% OFF!

Seattle

Breakthrough

Strategies

Workshop

Behavior and Budget Problems Stop Here!

Now $119 for 2 Days, $90 for 1 Day
Coupon Code: 30% OFF Seattle 2019 | Valid through 04-17-19
Register  |  Workshop Information

Working with difficult students doesn’t have to be so difficult

What kind of year will it be without our 200 problem-stopping strategies?

 


4 Free Worksheets with
Student Behavior Strategies

behavior strategies workshopYou’re going to love the four free student behavior strategies worksheets included in this edition of the Problem Student Problem-Solver Magazine. Hello from Youth Change Professional Development Workshops Director, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. We’ve loaded this issue with some of our very best behavior strategies for student problems like poor motivation and aggressiveness, and there is even a worksheet for girls who are not very motivated or interested in STEM classes.

These behavior improvement worksheets give you innovative, more effective strategies, and are taken from our in-person Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop, Online Breakthrough Workshop and Breakthrough ebooks and books. Our workshop is scheduled for Seattle in just about a month from now, on April 18-19, 2019. Scholarship work-study slots are still open if you are on a budget. Grab a scholarship by calling 503.982.4220 and in 5 minutes you’ll be signed up to sign away your worst student behavior management problems. The Breakthrough Workshop is designed to give you 200 solutions to make classroom behavior management stop being a battle and start being a success.

SEL social emotional learningMotivational
 Behavior Strategies Worksheet

This motivational behavior strategies worksheet for your students is a clever way to build motivation. Fortunately, more motivated students often translates to improved classroom management. The worksheet is a simple multiple choice that you can use as part of a group discussion or it also works well for use individually with students. Click here to get this behavior strategies handout in PDF format. It’s ready to print and use right away. It’s taken from our Education: Don’t Start the Millennium Without It Book.

 

 

 

STEM motivational worksheetBuild Girls’ Interest in STEM Courses
 Behavior Strategies Worksheet

This unconventional worksheet is so silly and funny, that you will practically sneak information into your students’ brains. Designed specifically for use with girls and young women, this lively worksheet confronts some of the stereotypes that can cause young females to initially feel uninterested in STEM courses. But, STEM courses are hugely important to future career success so it’s critical to break down those barriers and successfully motivate girls to consider giving STEM courses more of a chance. If you prefer to have the poster version of this fun intervention, it’s our very popular Poster #415; click here. To pick up the free PDF behavior strategies worksheet version, click here.

 

 

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Seattle Breakthrough Strategies Workshop

Behavior and Budget Problems Stop Here!

 

Now $119 for 2 Days, $90 for 1 Day

Coupon Code: 30% OFF Seattle 2019

Valid through 04-17-19

Register   Workshop Information

 


 

 

 

classroom management workshops

Schedule
Your On-Site
Inservice Workshop Now

It’s More Affordable Than You Think

Learn 100s of Strategies for Work Refusers, Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated and Withdrawn Students

1.800.545.5736 or Email

One Click Can Solve It All

 

 

Article Continues Here

behavior strategiesReduce Aggressiveness
 Behavior Strategies Worksheet

Here are some lively, creative behavior strategies to help improve your classroom management results. You can help students improve their demeanor and conduct with specific training techniques like this sample strategy. Obviously, this one behavior strategy worksheet can’t instantly change students but using lots of interventions like this will make a big difference over time. You don’t have to just live with students’ bad behavior when you regularly use behavior strategies like this example. This worksheet is intended for use with groups so you can help students understand how others see their behavior vs. their own self-perception. Many aggressive youngsters don’t realize the serious impact of their conduct on others. Gaining this insight can help some students to become more willing to work on behavior improvement. This behavior improvement strategies worksheet is from our Temper and Tantrum Tamers lesson book that is offered in both ebook and book format. To pick up the free student aggressiveness management worksheet, click here.

 

behavior strategies for temper tantrumsReduce Temper Tantrums
 Behavior Strategies Worksheet

If you have ever tried to get a student to accept help to stop aggressiveness, violence or temper tantrums, you know that many youngsters have little interest in changing. This worksheet is designed to start the process of students reconsidering their resistance by helping them realize that their acting-out will be a lifelong impediment and a huge obstacle to many of the things they may want to do throughout life. By helping students gain motivation to change, change is more likely to occur. This single intervention lesson will not be sufficient to engender change but it makes a great first step. If you keep using intervention strategies like those in this handout, you may actually begin to see improvement in behavior over time. Changing problem behavior is always going to work better than relying on consequences alone because consequences aren’t very good at compensating for missing self-control skills. That’s why behavior worksheets like this sample can generate far superior results than sanctions alone. This worksheet is from our popular Temper and Tantrum Tamer book or ebook. Pick up this ready-to-use temper tantrum improvement worksheet here.

 

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    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


What Works with Students Who Avoid or Refuse to Work

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

What Works with Students

Who Avoid or Refuse to Work

 

 


classroom management help

classroom management help

classroom management help

 

expert classroom management toolsNext Live Workshops:

 

30% OFF!

Seattle

Breakthrough

Strategies

Workshop

Behavior and Budget Problems Stop Here!

Now $119 for 2 Days, $90 for 1 Day
Coupon Code: 30% OFF Seattle 2019 | Valid through 04-17-19
Register  |  Workshop Information

Working with difficult students doesn’t have to be so difficult

What kind of year will it be without our 200 problem-stopping strategies?

 


What Works with Students

 

Who Avoid or Refuse to Work

 

work refusal articleThey are without a doubt among the hardest students to reach and teach. I’m talking about students who avoid school tasks or refuse to work entirely. Some may become almost mute, others won’t even make eye contact, but the common thread is that the student is drastically underperforming when it comes to accepting, completing and returning assignments. If you’re like most teachers, you never had a class in college called Introduction to Helping Students Who Avoid Work, but you probably wish there had been lots of courses exactly like that. You don’t have to go back to college. Help is right here in this how-to article.

If you want even more strategies and information that can produce improved results from students who avoid or refuse school work, come to our Seattle Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop on April 18-19, 2019 and get hours of detailed, step-by-step instruction on how to maximize your impact on these difficult to teach students. Hello from the course instructor, Youth Change Professional Development Workshops director, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. That’s a picture of me teaching in Seattle a couple years ago. I hope to see you back there in April when you can actually list out for me the student problems you want me to cover. You’ll leave with 200 use-now, more effective strategies.

 

Innovative Strategies for Students

 

Who Avoid or Refuse to Work

students who don't finish their work

 

Stop the Power Struggle

Most teachers know that is very easy to end up in a power struggle with students who don’t do much school work or none at all. As a mental health professional, I really need to point out that no adult ever won a power struggle and not adult ever will. So, if you have to admit that you do feel a bit like you are in a power struggle with some of your work refusing students, Step #1 has to be to acknowledge that to the youngster, declare a truce and back off for a moment.

Here’s why many or most students refuse work: Much of the time, these children and teens are terribly weighed down by some type of problem. Perhaps a parent is violent or missing. Perhaps they have an undiagnosed or diagnosed learning disorder that makes school work miserable. Maybe they are distracted or unmotivated. In this short article, we’ll focus on the first students mentioned above, the ones that are struggling with some type of emotional, social or learning problem. There are dozens of  free expert, how-to articles our site covering poor motivation that you can read. Building motivation in work refusing students can be a good help but if a student is too busy trying to stay awake after all-night domestic violence, motivation is only going to take you so far. Instead, being sensitive to what the child may be living through, may be a much more effective approach. Remember: You may be the only sane, sober adult in some students’ orbit. You definitely don’t want to add burdens. You want to be on their side as much as you can. Stopping any power struggles and explicitly talking about how to manage the work refusal is a great place to begin again.

students who don't finish their work

 

Ask the Expert

Who you think just might be the best expert to help you figure out how to best work with a student who is avoiding or refusing to work? That student. No one else may know why they are doing so little, so ask then listen carefully to the response you get when you ask for the reason for not wanting to start or complete tasks. If the student answers that they don’t know why, then ask “If you did know why, what might it be?” If that unexpected strategy fails, switch the focus to a friend or someone in popular culture and ask the student why that person might refuse to work. That switch may yield important clues and by shifting the focus to someone else, you may get more truth than the student would tell you otherwise.

Whether or not you succeed at getting more information, use the students’ expertise to improve the situation. Ask the student to help you understand what to do and what not to do to assist them. Tell the student you are on their side and don’t want to add to any problems they may already have. Tell the student that with their guidance, perhaps they could do less work on days they are struggling and more work on days they feel more able. Next, cooperatively develop a step by step plan that features tiny, tiny increases. If you aim for bigger increases, that creates the possibility of a big setback if the student fails. If the increase is tiny, and the student is saying that’s “too easy,” that’s perfect. You want the student to have some small successes but without the risk of a big fail. When this youngster fails, they often disappear from school or lose a lot of ground in other areas. This student is all about anxiety. Everything you do must decrease the anxiety because when the student experiences anxiety, that’s when they refuse work or disappear from school or class.

students who don't finish their work

 

It’s About Control

Typically, students who refuse to work are very anxious. They are struggling to cope. When they refuse to work, they are trying to take control over one of the few things in their world that they have any say over at all. You can struggle with them over the control but that is never going to go well. Instead, hand the control to them and you will see improved results. I suggest explicitly talking about control and anxiety with them, and reassuring them that you don’t want to add to their worries. Tell them you want to give them as much control over their work as possible. That can help them be a little less anxious. Their anxiety is the best guide. When it is high, reduce expectations. When it is relatively low, incrementally increase expectations for work. Let them know that you will give them slack when they are struggling, but in return, ask if they could work as hard as they can on days that they are feeling a bit better.

Be sure that these youngsters understand that they are going to need the skills taught in school, and if you two work together, they can accomplish that in a way that doesn’t put any strain on them. Once you are both on the same side, a general relaxation can occur and improvement can happen– but only to a certain extent. For example, students who are awake much of the night because their home is a battleground, will be limited in how much they will be able to do with little sleep and lots of worries.

Article Continues Below

 


 

30% OFF!

Seattle Breakthrough Strategies Workshop

Behavior and Budget Problems Stop Here!

 

Now $119 for 2 Days, $90 for 1 Day

Coupon Code: 30% OFF Seattle 2019

Valid through 04-17-19

Register   Workshop Information

 


 

 

 

classroom management workshops

Schedule
Your On-Site
Inservice Workshop Now

It’s More Affordable Than You Think

Learn 100s of Strategies for
Students Who Refuse Work, Are Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated or Withdrawn

1.800.545.5736 or Email

One Click Can Solve It All

 

 

Article Continues Here

students who don't finish their work

 

To Push or Not to Push?

Do I push students who do nothing in school, or do I back off? That’s the million dollar question, isn’t it? You may feel that when it comes to students who refuse to work or avoid assignments, it’s lose-lose. If you push, these students tend to double down on their resistance. Many stop showing up for school or class. If you don’t push, then the fear is that you are not educating these youngsters at all. Here’s the solution to this mystery: Both pushing and not pushing result in big fails. “To push or not to push” isn’t even the right question. The better question is “What should I do to get more results from these youngsters? In our workshops, we spend hours answering this question. In this brief how-to article, I can’t fit in the wealth of techniques I’ll be giving in Seattle in April in our Breakthrough Strategies Workshop, but here’s a few key pro tips:

As a mental health professional, I can assure you that typically many students who routinely and seriously refuse or avoid work, are facing some type of emotional, social or behavioral issue that impedes their functioning. Even so, despite the significant (but often not readily apparent or visible) challenges these students may have, most of these youngsters usually have days that are better or worse. On days that this student is struggling, reduce your expectations. On days that this student appears to be doing a bit better, increase your expectations. For example, a girl’s dad is on the road driving a long haul truck 4 days a week. You may notice her functioning is markedly improved when dad is on the road. You may notice the girl’s functioning nose dives when dad returns. That’s the time to cut her slack. Make specific agreements with students that reflect this type of plan.

Students tend to be really grateful to know that you are not going to cause more burdens to be added to their shoulders at times they are already carrying a very heavy load. The upshot is that now that there is no more power struggling over classroom work, and the student realizes that you understand their situation, they tend to work as hard as they can on the days they are able. They also tend to develop a lot of loyalty for you and that helps fuel their desire to work when they aren’t weighed down by whatever they may be going through. As an aside, I have to be sure to remind you to be sure to report any concrete indications of abuse or similar, as you are required by your site.

students who don't finish their work

 

Your Goal

The goal for students who refuse to work can and should be shared with these youngsters. That means you will be sensitive to what trauma, crisis, disability, emotional problem or plight the child is dealing with, but not at the expense of education. There is a balance between being sensitive to what the child may be living through and your mission to educate. If you can find that middle ground between those two parameters, you can really maximize the results these students can achieve.

No, you don’t need to worry about these children taking advantage of you if you are using this methods with students who have a lot of anxiety. That is key. These methods will fail with other populations of students. These intervention methods are designed only for use with students who are anxious or struggling with problems like trauma, domestic violence or loss. Dealing with the anxiety and whatever is causing it, takes so most of this students’ energy and resources. They don’t have much energy or interest left to plot and scheme how to take advantage of your reasonableness and kindness so being manipulated while using these methods is not normally a concern with the target population. Yes, manipulation would occur if you employ these strategies with populations they were not intended for.

If you are using this method with truly anxious and troubled students, they are much more likely to develop enormous loyalty towards you versus expend energy to exploit the accommodations you provide. You may be the only kind, humane adult they interact with. They are unlikely to jeopardize their lifeline. That’s why the best goal is to help them learn to work as hard as they can on days that they’re able. Hearing about that goal can reduce the power struggles and bring relief to children who are awash in pain.

 

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  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Secrets of the Best Classrooom Managers– The Experts’ Most Effective Classroom Management Tools

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Secrets of the Best Classroom Managers

The Experts’ Most Effective Classroom Management Tools

Includes Free Lesson Plan and Worksheet
 


classroom management help

classroom management help

classroom management help

 

expert classroom management toolsNext Live Workshops:

30% OFF!

Portland
Breakthrough Strategies Workshop

Classroom Management Problems Stop Here

Now $119 for 2 Days, $91 for 1 Day
Coupon Code: 30% OFF Portland 2018
Register  |  Workshop Information

Working with difficult students doesn’t have to be so difficult

What kind of year will it be without our 200 problem-stopping strategies?

 


 

Secrets of the Best Classroom Managers

The Experts’ Most Effective Classroom Management Tools

classroom management help

There always seems to be that handful of teachers who can manage even the most unmanageable students while their colleagues struggle to make any progress at all. The truth is that there are some basic classroom management tools that can help any teacher succeed managing even the most unmanageable youngsters. Hello from Youth Change Director Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I’ve just finished 6 weeks of touring the country training schools from Boston, Mass. to Yakima, Washington to Los Angeles, California. This article has gathered some of what I learned from teachers and counselors on my summer training tour. These new classroom management tools can help you build a better school year with fewer behavioral, social, academic and emotional problems.

teacher class managementTeach Missing Behavior Skills *

*Includes FREE lesson plan and student worksheet

If you are still expecting students to arrive with the skills they need to be successful, properly behaved students, you may have fallen behind the times. Yes, moms and dads used to reliably teach their offspring manners, civilized behavior, compliance skills, respect and so forth. These days, however, we can’t always count on parents to have taught their children to have the minimum behavior needed in your classroom and throughout the school. If you have tried to improve student conduct by setting rules and consequences, you probably have already discovered that quite often, rules and consequences don’t get the job done. While rules and consequences are essential, they are not nearly enough. If rules and consequences could get the job done, then I could require you to speak Swedish or face grave sanctions, and you would still be utterly unable to speak Swedish. Most of us have difficulty when expected to perform behaviors that no one has taught us. So, if you are serious about not wanting any more behavior management problems, then take the time to teach your students the exact skills they are not performing satisfactorily. Typically, those skills will include punctuality, hand raising, talking one at a time, compliance, chair sitting, managing school supplies and property, what to wear to school, what to bring to school, and so on. Are you wondering how you teach students what we call School Skills? Here is the answer. Check out this free, reproducible student worksheet and lesson plan that teaches students to more readily accept responsibility for their conduct rather than blame others.

 

classroom posterMotivation Reduces Classroom Behavior Problems

If you still expect unmotivated students to behave acceptably, you are going to often be disappointed. When students believe that school is as enticing as a root canal, some of them are going to act accordingly. Motivation can be taught. Yes, you did not have the chance to take courses like “Motivating Wannabe Sports Stars” or “Motivational Methods for Students Who Plan to Be Famous and Never Need School.” Those courses– and their content– do exist as you will find if you sign up now take our Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Students Workshop coming to Portland on October 11-12, 2018. In our workshop, you actually will learn powerhouse motivational methods for students hoping to become famous actresses, singers, sports stars, models and more. We even have strategies for students who hope to avoid needing school through reliance on their family or welfare. Check out just 1 of the 200 classroom strategies we will be giving out at our upcoming Portland, Oregon workshp. Here is an educational and compelling strategy (Poster #701, pictured at left) to convince students that regardless of their wished-for career path, they will still need school. Click on the link or the image so you can enlarge the picture enough to read the content of the poster. Once you start teaching your students to become more motivated, you are going to discover that motivation colors everything. You will find that the more you set aside time to motivate your students, the less time you will need to set aside for on-demand behavior management in your classroom and hallways. There are hundreds of motivational strategies throughout our site including here.

 

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student classroom managementSystematically Resolve Overwhelming Behavior Problems 

Your students’ classroom behavior management problems can quickly start to seem overwhelming. The volume and seriousness of the problems can seem substantial. You need an easy-to-implement game plan and here it is. First, start by writing down all the classroom management issues that you see. Second, prioritize the list. For the most part, there is no right way to prioritize beyond placing the issues that are most concerning to you at the top of the list. However, safety issues always get top rankings.  Now that you have your list sorted, you are ready to move forward. The third step is to focus on just the top three issues at a time, and forget the rest of the list for now. Teach students to have improved behavior for your top three concerns before moving onto the next three items. Note that teaching students to have improved behavior is not the same thing as setting consequences, re-stating the rules or any of the conventional classroom management strategies that you are already doing. Teaching means teaching. You will be teaching about how to walk down the aisle between the desks, or how to talk one at a time, or how to properly ask for help. You will be teaching these essential School Skills just like you teach math or handwriting: step-by-step, with lots of repetition until students have mastered and can use the concepts taught. This page on our website has hundreds of free lesson plans and worksheets so you can better grasp the details of training kids to become prepared, motivated, successful students.

 

classroom management tools for teachersLearn About Conduct Disorder

If you are still attempting to use conventional classroom behavior management methods with your most misbehaved students, you are playing a losing game. Conventional classroom management methods always fail with the most seriously unmanageable students. Until you take the time to learn about this mental health problem that affects an estimated 11-14% of your students, you will continue to find that “nothing works” to rein in the most hard-to-manage youngsters. These are the students who are small in number, but take up most of your behavior management time. There are countless articles on how to manage this student on our site. By investing a half hour now learning about what tailored techniques to use, and which common methods to avoid, you can get back in charge of your classroom. There are no shortcuts here. You either learn about this disorder and which classroom management tools to use, and which classroom management tools to avoid, or else prepare for a long, frustrating school year and an unending fight to control your classroom. Read about conduct disorders, and discover what this very common mental  health disorder is all about, and most importantly, what to start doing to successfully manage these most unmanageable students. There are no shortcuts. Either you learn these targeted, tested methods, or classroom management will remain problematic. The good news is that now you at least understand what has gone wrong– and how to fix it.

 

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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

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Successful School Discipline: How to Get Students to Follow the Rules

 

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Successful School Discipline:
How to Get Students to Follow the Rules

 

student discipline

Bullies in Class discipline

Classroom and school discipline can be the toughest part of any teacher’s or principal’s job. Even though discipline problems can dominate many school days, teacher training tends to be focused 80% on content and a mere 20% on behavior management and discipline. Many teachers and principals report receiving even less instruction on discipline, and student classroom management and behavior problems are often cited as the top reasons that teachers leave the profession entirely.

In our Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth professional development workshops (coming soon to Seattle on May 4-5, 2017), we devote hours teaching you how to have excellent student behavior management. It is also most definitely one of the most requested topics that our workshop participants ask us to cover. I’m the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop instructor, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. In this article, I’ll give you a peek into some of the top strategies we offer in our professional development inservice sessions. While this is certainly not a comprehensive article, it has some of our best tips to get you started on the path to successful school discipline. If you need more than the sampling of ideas briefly covered in this short how-to article, consider signing up for our Seattle Breakthrough Strategies Workshop sessions on May 4-5, 2017, where we will provide a whopping 200 interventions, all designed to produce successful classroom and school discipline.

 

Successful School Discipline:
How to Get Students to Follow the Rules

teacher classroom managementConvince Students of the

Importance of Rules

Many of us– whether young or old– fail to reliably follows rules and policies that we find to be unreasonable. Many very reasonable classroom and school rules are viewed by students to be totally bogus, and they act accordingly, and discipline suffers. To improve compliance with school and classroom rules, convince your students of the importance of those policies. Here is a fast and memorable way to accomplish just that. Remember: students who see value in the rules are far more likely to reliably follow those rules.

This strategy is a role reversal and many students can be offered the opportunity to participate in it. Ask one of your students to become the role play teacher. You may wish to choose a student who normally resists or ignores school or classroom rules. Offer the student a great prize in lieu of the paycheck that teachers earn. The prize can be anything that is enticing, such as getting out of class a bit early, or soda pop, or stickers, or whatever fits your age group. To earn the prize, the role-play teacher merely needs to teach the class to remember a 5 digit number. Sounds so easy, doesn’t it? But, this is a classroom with no rules. Even worse for the role play teacher, you’ve distributed a lot of the things you don’t want to see in class, items like bubble gum, snacks, cell phones, etc. If necessary, you can also prime several students to engage in other problematic behaviors like talk outs, being out of their seat, and so on.

The role play teacher attempts to teach your classroom and quickly discovers that it’s impossible. With your prompting, encourage the role play teacher to set rules, and attach the role play teacher’s name to the rules. Next, have him or her write the new rules on the board. After a while, retire your first role play teacher and give other class members a chance to experience teaching in a classroom without rules. Once enough students have gotten to experience the extreme difficulty of trying to teach in a class without rules, discuss whether there just might be values in rules. Not only will students view the rules differently, they are far more likely to follow them because their names are now attached to your classroom rules, and they are the ones that created those rules. Students are unlikely to hassle rules they created and named. You will be delighted at the difference in your classroom and school.

 

Teach Skills

Because Consequences

Will Never Compensate

control temper help

 

Many educators believe that if they simply have big enough consequences for school and classroom rule violations, that those sanctions are the way to ensure successful discipline. Sadly, that assumption is often completely wrong. If I say to you that unless you start speaking Swedish right now, you are going to face terrible consequences, most people in the U.S. still can’t speak Swedish. When you say to your students that if you engage in problematic conduct, you will face big sanctions, that is really no different.

If you want to excellent student behavior management and discipline, you must teach the behaviors that you expect– and also motivate students to see the importance of complying with the expectations, as discussed above. The clearest illustration is to look at your rules regarding the use of violence. Students who grow up in a violent family, for example, may have no idea how control their fist, mouth and actions. At home and in their neighborhood, using their fists may be commonplace, and consistently using more socially acceptable behaviors may be unfamiliar and seem undoable, just like you speaking Swedish on command. To expect a consequence to compensate for that deficit is naive and unrealistic, yet that is often what happens when schools expect students to magically change their behavior just because a heavy duty consequence can result. If you truly want student conduct to be better, you are going to have to teach those specific behaviors in an organized, step-by-step manner, very similar to the way you teach specific academic subjects. Further, just as you would never expect a student to magically or instantly learn calculus or to read, students can’t suddenly master self-control behavior skills.

Pictured above is a sample student worksheet that teaches acceptable behavior instead of aggression. It is from our Temper and Tantrum Tamers lesson book. Our website has thousands of resources that teach students self-control but our books, live professional development inservice workshops and online courses are your best bet.

 

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discipline postersBut My Classroom Is Completely Unmanageable

The truth is that some of you are still reading this article because your classroom or school seems really out of control, and there doesn’t seem to be any clear path toward reversing a worsening trend. Here is your solution:

First, if the classroom has really been quite out of control, it is usually far easier to start over than to clean up the existing situation. So, you will need declare Room 630 History Class or Mt. Vernon Elementary’s 3rd Grade Room 50 done and gone. Rename the space and start over. However, you must be able to re-start incredibly strong and firm or you will quickly find yourself back where you started.

Second, to avoid ever getting into this situation at all, we always recommend you start your school year being way too firm and strong in how you manage students. If you decide later to ease up, no student will fight you. However, if you start off a bit weak, indecisive or you are easily played by students, I can guarantee that you will not be able to easily– or perhaps ever– tighten up as students will fight hard to maintain the chaos, commotion and disruption that has become the standard. When you re-start, you must acknowledge the problems that occurred, clearly state what will be different, and then make sure that the new version of your classroom is firmly managed, with strict consequences, along with regular training that shows students how to meet behavior and discipline expectations. You will also need to motivate your students to see the value in school and education because a motivated student is far less likely to fritter away their education on misbehavior. Poster #471 (shown at right) is just one of our thousands of motivation-makers that transform kids into motivated learners. Our live conferences, online professional development seminars and books all can guide you because Youth Change Professional Development Workshops is your school discipline and behavior management expert. We are your classroom management authority, and we specialize in preventing and fixing serious, persistent behavior management problems. We’re here to help. You can email us here.

 

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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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The 5 Best Classroom Management Hacks

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

The 5 Best Classroom Management Hacks

 
 

 

classroom managementDid you know that you can avoid many classroom management problems before they start?

Happy New School Year from me, Youth Change Professional Development Workshops Director, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I have spent most of my life writing books, creating posters and leading workshops to help teachers figure out what to do when classroom management has become a serious problem. Let me show you how to skip the back-to-school pitfalls that can make teaching so frustrating and exasperating for the next 9 months. These effective, must-do classroom management hacks are time-tested and teacher approved to work better than conventional approaches.

Youth Change Workshops cares about you and your students so if you need more help, we have our Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop coming up soon in Portland on October 13-14, 2016. If you have a bad budget, scholarships are still available by calling 1.800.545.5736. You'll leave the workshop with 200 solutions for the classroom management problems you name at the start of our first day so you're guaranteed to get solutions for your exact students and their exact problems.

 

Top 5

Classroom Management

Hacks

 

classroom management articles1. Start Strong
    Because There Are No Do-Overs

No student will ever fight back or complain if you start out the school year being a very strong disciplinarian and then decide to loosen up a bit. However, if you start off being a weak or even moderate disciplinarian and decide later that you need to tighten up…well, good luck with that.

It is so hard to tighten up classroom management and so easy to loosen up. It always amazes me that this central premise isn't the foundation of every teacher's classroom management game plan.

Having spent my whole career helping educators tighten up problematic class management, I really can appreciate that it can feel like battle to re-invent a classroom once an unsatisfactory atmosphere has developed. It's almost like the classroom gets branded as a free-for-all. That's why I sometimes have to recommend that an existing classroom be "discontinued" instead of trying to wage an uphill battle to turnaround that negative perception. So, if you do find yourself fighting serious classroom management battles, it is better to start completely over. You can even re-name your classroom, redo the layout and make other cosmetic changes to emphasize that "Room 256" is gone and now this is "Beyond Room 256" or similar. Re-starting works best at natural break times like the end of a term or after a holiday break.

However, there's a caveat to this remodeling plan: If you tell your students that "things are going to be different," you better deliver. You'll still get challenged and tested and if you don't satisfactorily manage the challenges and tests, expect things to return to the way they were. If you don't satisfactorily manage what the students throw your way in your "new" classroom, it will become even harder to engineer the classroom conditions you need to teach. That means if you do create a "new" classroom, make sure you have acquired the skills, attitude, motivation, mentoring and backing you need to guarantee that your "new" classroom will be "new and improved," not just "new" but with the same old problems.

 

classroom management article2. Establish Rules
    In a Way That Ensures Compliance

Remember when they put that new stop sign in by your house? Remember how mad you were that you didn't even get a say about it and now you have to live with it? You thought to yourself: "Yesterday, I just rolled through here and today, I want to just roll through here." Wouldn't you have felt better about the new sign and complying with it, if you'd at least had some input into the decision to install it? Sure, and the same logic applies to your students.

When students arrive at the first day of school and are told that they need to follow this rule and that rule and this rule, they react a lot like you did when you thought about cruising through the new stop sign. What if you allowed students to help shape the rules? Well, the answer to that question is that you'd have the same set of rules but far better compliance.

On the first day of school, start with a classroom with no rules and let students take turns role-playing the job of teacher. Give a great prize in lieu of a paycheck. To earn the prize, the role play teachers just have to teach the other students to memorize a five digit number. Sounds so easy, doesn't it? Yes, but, this is a classroom with no rules. The other students can talk at will, leave the class at will, pop bubble gum, and so on. The role play teacher will soon become frustrated. When that happens, offer the role play teacher the opportunity to create rules and let the student attach his or her own name to the rules. For example, "Juan's No Cussing Rule." The rules are now things created by your students and their names are attached to them.

Students are far less likely to hassle or trash the rules that they invented and bear their names. This is a slam-dunk easy way to build in excellent classroom management and discipline from the first ring of the first bell.
 

classroom management3. Teach Behavior, Attitude and Motivation

     Before You Expect Them

Few teachers would expect math or reading skills before anyone taught them to students, but many teachers do expect students to start the school year with appropriate behavior, a good attitude and ample motivation. Sadly, those expectations are often not realistic in our contemporary time. Years ago, parents more reliably taught their offspring to behave acceptably, have a reasonable attitude and sufficient motivation. That is not always the case now. That means if you want to work with properly behaved, motivated students who have good attitudes, you are going to have to teach that. You can expect anything you want, but if you haven't taught it to the child– and no one else has taught it to the child either– then you are often going to be disappointed.

There are thousands of lively, effective methods to teach students to have acceptable behavior, attitude and motivation. Take a look at some step-by-step, how-to guides that are in our archive of past "Classroom Management Strategies" articles.

The bottom line is that good classroom management is predicated on students using proper behavior, and having adequate motivation and attitude. If you want good classroom management, you need to teach students to do their part. It is difficult– perhaps even impossible– to have good classroom management with students who are chronically badly behaved, unmotivated and have negative attitudes. If you want to change what you see in your classroom, start by training your students to look, act and sound like successful students.

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student classroom management4. Proactively Identify and
    Manage Problem-Starters 

There's always at least one, isn't there? There's always at least one student in every classroom who seems to start the fires and feed them once they're started. Identify this student on Day 1 and immediately develop an effective plan to manage him or her. If you wait until this student is in trouble for misbehavior, it's too late as these youngsters are often pretty cagey and slick– even at a young age– and can be master manipulators of both students and adults.

Even more important, you need to know that one-size-fits-all discipline techniques fit no one, and that is part of why this student can reign supreme on your turf. Just like you know 200 ways to teach spelling to fit each student, you need to know 200 ways to implement classroom management to fit each student. Often, your biggest trouble-maker doesn't respond to conventional, everyday discipline methods and behavior intervention strategies. You may have noticed that "nothing works" to control these seriously acting-out students. The amazing thing is that mental health and juvenile corrections staff have developed tailored techniques for the most extremely misbehaved youngsters, and have been successfully using these methods for generations. Even more amazing, most educators have not been offered these tested and researched techniques. The one exception to this statement is that special education teachers are sometimes fortunate to have been given training on how to manage the most extremely misbehaved children. These special educators may have been given some or a lot of practical training on how to manage students who have been given the mental health diagnosis of conduct disorder.

It is estimated that 11-14% of the population of children and teens have conduct disorder– whether diagnosed or not. The key thing here is that you can't use ordinary behavior management techniques with this population as those approaches always fail and usually make the problems worse. So, if you want to have the tools you need, the reality is that you need to upgrade your skills to include behavior management techniques designed for very acting-out students. We can help with that upgrade. You can rely on our site's free resources to learn classroom management methods designed to work more effectively with children with conduct disorder. These carefully tailored and researched interventions are going to work so much better than the generic methods that you're using now. There are lots of free articles on conduct disorder on our site. You can start by reading an introductory article on conduct disorder.

 We also have many live, online and on-site workshops on the topic. We also have books, ebooks and audio books that can quickly deliver these must-have tools so that you finally have the updated, targeted methods you need to rein in your most misbehaved, hard-to-manage students. You'll learn the reasons why you must work with the most misbehaved students by having many, ultra-high consequences; making sure that all interactions relate to what the student cares most about; making sure you know the student's most liked rewards and disliked sanctions; confronting all bad behavior every time; never giving second chances; drastically limiting discussion over sanctions and rule violations; maximizing supervision at all times; watching for set-ups; watching for manipulation, lies and delinquency, and if your boss and team permit, you need to stop being so fair.

The bottom line: If you can control your most misbehaved students and negative leaders, you're well on your way to controlling your entire classroom. 

 

classroom management for teachers5. Get Help Now

One of the top reasons that teachers quit is that they hate the state of their classroom management. Some teachers may improve on their own, but the vast majority of teachers who are living through a classroom management nightmare really need to acquire better tools and information. Since 80% of a typical teacher's training focused on academic content, it's not a surprise that classroom management can seem so daunting. Based on that percentage, one would expect that a typical teacher's day is dominated by content issues, but ask any educator and they will tell you that their day is dominated by students' behavioral, social and emotional problems– yet those are all areas given limited or no practical training in pre-service courses.

Severe or chronic classroom management problems are unlikely to change unless the teacher changes. If you've read this article looking for the way out of your classroom management war, the truth is that change isn't going to just happen. You are going to have to actively upgrade your skills and possibly, your personality style and demeanor. That's not to say that every teacher needs to have a loud and forceful personality, for instance– some of the best classroom managers are very quiet and laid back– but if students see you as an easy mark or easily fooled, some personal change may be required to combat that perception. That's why a mentor can be such a help. So, consider finding someone with great classroom management and a personality like yours– or what you wish your personality could be more like– and ask for help. While there is no substitute for upgrading your skill set to fit contemporary students, for some educators, tweaking their personality style and demeanor will also be necessary.

Students read us adults like open comic books. That means they sometimes know us and our weaknesses far better than we know ourselves. You may fool your boss, your co-workers and yourself, but you will almost never fool your students. So, it's incredibly important that you believe wholeheartedly that you can effectively manage difficult students. And, that's not something you can learn from a workshop. That's why upgrading your skills may need to be accompanied by finding a caring mentor who tells it like it is.

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    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


The Best Teacher Classroom Management Strategies, Methods & Techniques

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

The Best Teacher Classroom Management Strategies,
Methods and Techniques

 

 

 

 

Several of the great classroom management strategies included in this Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog article were given to us by participants in our Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshops, but the names of the participants have long since become separated from these terrific ideas.

classroom management strategiesHello from Breakthrough Strategies Professional Development Workshop instructor Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I guess I'm the one to blame for stealing these terrific classroom management strategies and techniques, but the important thing is that these great methods are being passed onto teachers and counselors who need them to maximize their impact on misbehaved, troubled and problem students.

So, if you are one of our former course participants now reading an idea that you mentioned in class, let me apologize for borrowing your inspiration. Our Breakthrough Strategies Workshop has always been a collection of the best teacher classroom management methods that exist. The source of these inspired classroom management methods is not as important as disseminating these gems to benefit students who are struggling.
 

Classroom management strategies for teachersClassroom Management Strategies

4 of the Best
 

1. WAIVER OF MY RIGHTS

Classroom Management Strategy
 

As shown below, this classroom management intervention is geared for teachers and schools, but if you will simply alter a few key words from the school-based example below, you can easily make this device work at your Job Corps, foster home, treatment center, etc. This intervention is designed to be used with children and youth who feel that your service is a waste of time.

Remember: You must judge this and every other behavior and classroom management intervention that we offer to see if it fits your students, your locale, etc. The intervention below is not suitable for all students. You can also consider editing to make it gentler. To get a broader array of methods, consider coming to our professional development inservice workshops or buying some of our books. Our workshops and books flood you with a vast assortment of counselor and teacher behavior management methods, rather than the small handful of techniques offered here.
 

Waiver of My Rights

I, _____ hereby give up my constitutional right to a free education.

I give up the right to have a high-paying job forever.

I do not want to be a partner in my own success.

Signed,
_________________

 

2. THINK ABOUT IT

Classroom Management Strategy
 

Other than not being a very good sentence, this next device may be a great thing to say to impulsive youngsters: "You can't think yourself out of what you acted yourself into." Then work with them to think first, act second.
 

3. MAKE A WHINE LIST

Classroom Management Strategy
 

Some days, a girl's just gotta gripe. Boys too. The next "black Monday," when all attitudes seem to be dreary and whiny, here is a fun student behavior change activity that can turn it around. If you're a teacher, this may be an activity that you can relate to writing, art, or reading.

You can choose one of the following versions of this classroom management strategy. One choice: Let your students make a Whine List of all their complaints, and get the complaining out of their systems.

This second version of the intervention is just so amazingly cute– and even better, this classroom management strategy is incredibly effective too: Have your students devise a menu for a restaurant called The Irri-Table, and then create dishes that fit the mood. For example, the main course might be crab in whine sauce. You may want to follow this activity with a discussion of what happens to crabby employees in the work place, and assist students to develop plans to moderate their attitudes on the next black Monday.

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teacher classroom management strategies4. WHAT STUDENTS WANT

Classroom Management Strategy


It may be useful to note what students often say they want from their teachers and counselors. It may not be what you think. Some surveys have shown that students don't ask for less work, longer lunch or more days off. So what do they want? They want their teachers and counselors to believe in them. That thought can guide you.

Research, reported in Education Week on 9-3-03, notes that when youth professionals "pay attention to students' social and emotional development, children do better academically." I have to admit that the top complaint we get in our workshops from teachers is that they are sickened by what they overhear in neighboring classrooms or in the hall.

At a school here in our town, a boy named Len teetered towards dropping out. Then, starting with the new school year, Len was assigned a math teacher who belittled Len and called him names on a daily basis. Soon, Len started coming in late for math, then he skipped math entirely. Eventually, he stopped showing up at all. Says a former classmate: "In the 12 years I shared classes with him, I watched many teachers try unsuccessfully to make it better for Len, but I will always remember the one teacher who successfully made it worse."

Use this story to motivate yourself to always make school a haven and never more torment for troubled and struggling students.

 Teacher classroom management methods

LIKE THESE
CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES?

We have thousands more in our books, online professional development classes, classroom management posters and counselor and teacher training workshops. The smattering of strategies listed in this Behavior and Classroom Management blog article are just a few of the interventions we have to help you build a more productive year. View more of our unexpected, compelling behavior and classroom management strategies here. When you think of problem youth, think of Youth Change Workshops. Our intervention strategies will help you help your troubled and problem students succeed.

 

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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
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How to Work with Students Who Use Violence to Refuse to Work in Class

 

violent students

 

Just Say "No," Don't Throw!

How to Work with Students
Who Use Violence
to Refuse to Work in Class

 

teacher workshop scholarshipsteacher workshops

 

 

students who refuse workIn this issue, we focus on a question posed by a subscriber to the Behaviors and Classroom Management Blog. You can contact us with your question and you just might see it featured in a future issues. You can email me, Ruth Herman Wells, Director of Youth Change Professional Development Workshops or click Live Help on the bottom of any page on our website

Suzanne is a teacher who emailed me for help teaching her students who are work refusers, but unlike most students who try to do nothing in class, some of Suzanne's students are becoming violent about it. If you are used to students who are more passive about not wanting to work in school, you may find it a whole different ball game when working with students who act out while making their refusal known.

Here is what Suzanne wrote:

"At our school we have been having difficulty dealing with children who when faced with work will throw things, or act out in very dramatic ways. How do you go about helping the child while protecting the education of your other students?"

 

Students Who Refuse to Work

2 Types, 2 Sets of Strategies
 

At the risk of a bit of over-simplification, there are probably at least two major reasons why student will act-out dramatically when faced with work. You can't necessarily use the same interventions with different types of work refusers. Well, you can use the same interventions but they won't work equally well with different kinds of students. Just as you can't use a single math text book or reading technique with every student, you can't rely on a single style of intervention, consequence or talk to work with the variety of students who refuse assignments.
 

student won't work in classStudent #1
 

Here is the first type of student who refuses to work in class. If you've been a longtime subscriber to The Behavior and Classroom Management Blog, you should find yourself on familiar turf and ready to move forward. This youngster is a student who we've covered many times before in many articles in this blog, so we'll just touch on this student this time, then move on to the second reason. If you want to review some of the previous articles on work refusal, check out our huge assortment of free educational professional development articles on the topic in our Educational Articles Index.

One reason that students may engage in extreme behaviors when faced with a task, is that the student has a mental health problem called Conduct Disorder. If you have been a subscriber to the articles  in this blog, hopefully, you remember what you learned in past issues when we covered this topic.

The key points that we hope stuck with you from reading those articles are these: Children with conduct disorders (C.D.) lack a conscience so they do what they want, when they want, to who they want. C.D.s are your most misbehaved kids so there is a chance that if someone is routinely  throwing items and is utterly unremorseful, that child could be conduct disordered. A child with C.D. can engage in serious misconduct at any time, but certainly, when faced with a distasteful task, that task can easily prompt bad behavior.

violent studentsAs you may remember, you must use a completely different set of techniques with C.D.s so the way you prevent and manage misbehavior with this portion of your students is very different from how you accomplish that goal with the rest of your group. So, Suzanne, for the possible C.D.s in your classroom, use the techniques we've offered you in previous issues. Can't locate those issues? Here again are our introductory training guides on Conduct Disorder. Want more details than offered in the two introductory articles? You can purchase our Conduct Disorders and Anti-Social Youth book, ebook, audio book or online training course to get all the information you need for this portion of your students.

As you may recall from the past issues, C.D.s are usually at least 11-14% of a typical mainstream classroom, so you can expect to always have at least a few to manage in every setting. So, it's well worth your time to have top-notch skills with this very difficult-to-manage population of students.

 

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students refuse workStudent #2
 

The second major explanation why a student will chronically and violently refuse work is that the youngster is overwhelmed, frustrated, tired, upset, or hoping to avoid the chore. This youngster is like a pressure cooker who can explode. Years ago, families more thoroughly and reliably taught their offspring how to behave and manage frustration, and students' conduct reflected that.

With this group of misbehaved youngsters, you will have to teach them the self-management techniques that they did not master at home. You will also need to equip them with the motivation and attitudes that would foster better conduct. Our Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop and books have hundreds of strategies on self-control, accepting assignments, and anger management. We have included a few of our favorites below:
 

Your Mama 101


If you don't have a class with the title of "Your Mama 101," then maybe now is the time to start one. This class can teach youngsters all the skills they need to manage their anger and aggression.

What are some of your youngsters learning about anger control at home and in the community? At home, anger may be screamed away, or drugged away, or dishes may be thrown. None of those behaviors are acceptable at your site, yet that is all the anger management that some children know. Until you teach your students to manage their anger, many will continue to be unable to behave in a socially acceptable manner.

Even though teaching anger control perhaps should not have to be your job, you may want to make it your job. Until you do teach those skills, you may find that there are no consequences, no rules– no anything– that will work as a substitute. You wouldn't expect math skills until you taught those skills. Similarly, you can't shouldn't expect anger control skills until you teach those skills. While, in theory, you can expect or want any behaviors you wish, until you teach students how to perform those behaviors, you probably won't see those behaviors.

Here's an example of a ready-to-use intervention that helps younger students who often lack patience and act out aggressively when frustrated. Use this silly mnemonic device to gently help students use more socially acceptable ways to attempt to decline a task: "Just say 'no,' don't throw."
 

Find Work With a Temper Like That


This strategy remains a favorite at our live workshops, so we will include it here. Ask your students to name all the jobs that they can do and throw things (or lose control) whenever they want. There are none. When your students figure that out, ask them if they will ever need to work.
 

Pro-Active Skill Training


Don't wait for the book to sail through the air. Pro-actively teach all your students the self-control skills they need. For Suzanne's situation, she could teach students what to say when they don't want to do a task, they don't know how to do it, or they need help.

You may assume that most children are able to say "I don't want to do it," which is a much better way of communicating than throwing a book. Be careful about that assumption. Children are not little adults. They may not know how to properly say that they'd prefer to forgo the chore. Give them the sentences they need so they can properly communicate with you.

Be very sure to address all three of the circumstances mentioned above. We recommend that the sentence begins with "yes." For example, you could give your students sentences such as "Yes, I know you want me to read that story aloud but I don't want to do it."

We recommend the "yes" as adults often appreciate that initial gesture of willingness, and including that word may make that sentence work successfully with a wide variety of teachers, coaches, parents, etc. rather than just with you.

Many teachers post their recommended three sentences on the wall of the classroom. A sample sentence: "Yes, I will do it but I really don't want to." Be sure to cover all the skills needed to manage work in your setting, not just the three circumstances noted here. So, for example, be sure to cover managing boredom during tasks; what to do when you are upset; managing frustration during a task; what to do when you hate a task; and so on. Remember: Any area that you do not cover, will remain a problem.

 

Talk About Work Refusal


Chances are that you have never even discussed with your students how often they should decline work. That means that your students are expected to adhere to a standard that you have never quantified for them. Assist students to identify how often work refusal is permitted each day in the work world, then help them establish a standard that is fairly similar. Now, your students have a quantifiable standard, and appreciate the logic behind it.
 

studentPain Delay


When you give an assignment to a youngster, no child will ever reply: "I watched Dad beat my Mom last night. Science just doesn't seem very relevant right now. Can I postpone this task?" Few youngsters will neatly identify their pain and request an accommodation so you have to provide them a way to gain relief on days that they are particularly troubled. Without a socially appropriate way to gain relief, some troubled students will act out.

Here are some methods that can eliminate the need to act out. For older kids who you suspect may face serious problems, allow them to identify "good work days" and "bad work days."

For younger children, you can make a mock- up of a traffic light, and have red be a "bad work day," yellow would be an "okay work day," and green is a "good work day."

If you worry that distressed students may take advantage of your accommodations, don't worry. You'll become their life line, and they won't jeopardize that connection. They will work as hard as they can on days they are able. Isn't that really all you should ask of a child who lives in pain?

 

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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


 

Strategies Transform Your Classroom Management Nightmare into Your Classroom Management Dream

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Strategies to Transform Your
Classroom Management Nightmare
Into Your
Classroom Management Dream

 
 

 

It's amazing that most universities devote just 20% of their teacher  training to the real-world issues that dominate most teachers' days. 80% of the typical teacher's training focused on content. Few teachers find 80% of their day devoted to content. Many teachers find much of their time diverted from teaching content to the classroom management nightmare in front of them.

Expert help with classroom managementI'm keynote speaker and classroom management trainer Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I've spent much of my career devising awesome, improved, more effective methods to improve teacher classroom management.

Part of the reason that classrooms seem tougher to manage than years ago, may be that today's students are very different than students from years ago. As we host our Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshops around the country, we continue to have more teachers ask for help with students who are outright non-compliant, and verbally abusive to both peers and adults. If you are a teacher, or even a special educator, counselor, social worker or psychologist, your training may not have given you the prevention and intervention tools that you need to stop the extreme misbehavior that you may be coping with on a daily basis.

In our workshops and classroom management books, we devote hours to covering how to control even uncontrollable classrooms and groups. We can't magically squeeze all those hours of must-know classroom management information into this small space, but we can give you at least a few of the most important elements to get you on the path to ending your classroom management nightmare. Here are the top steps to at least start you down the road to managing unmanageable classrooms:
 

Classroom Management Strategies That Work

S T O P
Using One-Size-Fits-All Methods


S T A R T
Using the Right Method with the Right Student

You would never expect all students to fit into the same size of desk, or learn math exactly the same way, so why do you expect them to all respond equally well to the same behavior change methods? Human beings are complex. The same intervention may play out very differently from one student to the next.

If you still use just a handful of methods with all your students, you may be feeling more and more frustrated when it comes to group and classroom management. It is absolutely critical that you have a wide variety of methods to draw upon to manage each situation.

Remember: It's not about which methods you want to use or like to use. Your doctor may like prescribing aspirin but if aspirin won't help you, then the intervention is useless. It's about using the interventions that can work with a specific student.

Example Strategies:
Not every student understands how to quiet down in class. Not every student is motivated to quiet down when asked. Merely stating the rules or expectations worked years ago.

Poster Improves classroom managementMere verbiage may still work with some youngsters, but others need much more than words. For these students, try this approach. This intervention can provide the youngster with guidance and help performing the behavior– so much so that the behavior might even become a habit. Teach your students that "When the hand goes up, the mouth goes shut." (Our Poster #249 illustrates the concept.)

Consider putting one the students who struggles to quiet down, in charge of this intervention. That variation makes this intervention a very cagey way to get compliance from the student who is least likely to comply. This tailored intervention will often work well with non-compliant, distracted, ADHD, and defiant students because it is so much fun– especially if you are the student who gets to lead the intervention.

 

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S T O P
Teaching Unskilled, Unmotivated Students


S T A R T
Teaching School Skills and Motivation

Giving rules to students who lack the skills and motivation to comply is ineffective. That one sentence explains so much of what you need to know about on-going classroom management problems.

classroom management strategyContemporary children must be taught the nuts-and-bolts of the target behaviors. They also need to be convinced that education matters. Otherwise, rules and consequences will continue to fail to elicit the desired behaviors from youngsters who may have no idea how to comply, or any inclination to do so.

Example Strategy:
Here's an intervention that teaches an important school skill: how to interact with teachers. Poster #26 offers you a great example of how teaching school behavior skills must be done. The training must be specific, attention-grabbing, memorable and step-by-step. Poster #26 also illustrates the point that every single area of school behavior must be covered, even areas not routinely addressed– like teacher interaction skills and how to ask for help.
 

S T O P
Using Outdated Techniques


S T A R T
Using Methods That Fit Contemporary Students

Are you using the same methods that were in use when carbon paper, record players and chalkboards were still around? If you are, you're using yesterday's methods with today's students, and that works about as well as scratchy, old, vinyl records.

Here's one example of how your students have changed even though your methods perhaps haven't. Years ago, you had a small number of unmanageable students. Now, it is common to expect as much as 14% of mainstream students to be classroom management nightmares. Plus, today's out-of-control student is using far worse behaviors. Using old-style methods to manage today's severely unmanageable students is like trying to use outmoded chalk on your modern, dry eraser board. You can try, but it just won't work.

To become proficient managing a contemporary classroom, you must learn about conduct disorders, your most misbehaved, contemporary student. Conventional approaches fail most of the time with these hard-to-manage youngsters, and there is no work-around but to begin to use updated interventions that fit.

Example Strategies:
For your most misbehaved, conduct disordered students, you need to switch to approaches that maximize consequences, while avoiding relationship-based and character ed types of methods. You also need to avoid giving single consequences, and to be less predictable in your responses. If you predictably give just a consequence or two, manipulative conduct disordered youngsters may anticipate your response, and go ahead and do the problem behavior. If they don't know exactly what stack of consequences they might face, their behavior may stay closer to what you want.

To successfully manage conduct disorders, you must learn everything you can about them. These youngsters are often so cagey and smart, that they can easily discern and exploit uncertainty. They are often just uncanny about knowing who "has their number" and who doesn't– and behave accordingly. Unless you "switch gears" when working with them, you'll find that your classroom management concerns worsen.

If you're a longtime subscriber to the Behavior and Classroom Management Blog, the introductory basics of working with conduct disordered students were included in your second and third issues of this blog. If you want to read that introductory blog issue again, it's here. The articles are entitled What Every Youth Professional Needs to Know About Violent Students, Parts 1 and 2.

classroom management bookIf you want to learn more about this quickly growing population, consider getting a thorough guide, our All the Best Answers for the Worst Kid Problems: Conduct Disorders book, audio book or ebook. Once you enhance your skills with the students who are your worst classroom management nightmares, you'll often discover a great bonus: the level of behavior of all students rises once the prime agitators are more in control.

 

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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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Fast Methods to Stop Classroom Management Problems

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

5 Fast Strategies to Stop
Classroom Management Problems
Before They Start

 
 

We have been getting the same classroom management questions over and over again at the Live Expert Help area of our web site (http://www.youthchg.com). Many of you have been asking how to get young people to behave in class and group settings. Many of the counselors have passed along requests from teachers who want to know how to stop the non-stop discipline problems that disrupt the learning process.

K-12 Keynote Speaker Ruth Herman WellsI'm the director of Youth Change Workshops, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I've spent my whole career amassing the best classroom management methods that exist. I'm going to share five of my favorites here, along with a couple bonus methods.

Kids are not born instinctively knowing how to talk one at a time, keep their hands to themselves and stay quiet when others are talking. In fact, most– if not all– of the behaviors that adults want to see in their class or group setting, must be taught. Years ago, a teacher, for example, could count on most families to train their offspring to talk one at a time, keep their hands to themselves, etc. Now, many of you may find that many of your students appear to have little preparation from home on how to behave appropriately in the classroom. That's part of why classroom management has been getting harder and harder.

Although perhaps it should be the parents' job to train their offspring to have basic behavior management and self-control skills, it's quite clear that many families cannot or will not provide this essential training. So, to get the discipline and order you want in your classroom, school or site, you will have to provide that training.

You must be thorough, covering everything from attendance and punctuality to when to talk and what to wear to school. Plus, remember that stating expectations is never enough. You must drill skills into habits, and don't forget to defuse the apathy and adjust negative attitudes so students are sufficiently motivated and disposed to perform the behaviors that you want. You must cover all three areas: skills, motivation and attitude. We call this essential preparation to be a student School Skills Training.

Below you will find a handful of School Skills Training strategies from our thousands of behavior and classroom management methods that train youngsters to behave appropriately and develop motivation and a positive attitude. If you want more than this sampling of methods, sign up for an upcoming live workshop. Scholarships are available. You can also take our courses online or click over to our website, http://www.youthchg.com, to see thousands more behavior and classroom management methods to prevent or manage student misconduct and apathy.

Article continues below…

 

 

prodcategtags9

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Article continues here…

5 Fast Strategies to Stop
Classroom Management Problems
Before They Start

 

1. Finish What You Started

classroom management methodsGetting students to finish their work can be a year-long battle. Win the war on task completion by helping students see the value in finishing their work. Our Poster #323 provides a quick way to give you a motivational technique to help students understand why it is critical that they finish class assignments. You don't need to buy the poster, you can simply say the phrase pictured, although the poster offers a constant reminder instead of a transitory one. Of course, it takes more than one intervention to motivate students, but you can find hundreds of additional methods on our site.

BONUS METHOD: Motivating students to care about finishing their work is a necessary first step but you will also have to teach task completion skills. Be sure to teach: How to hear assignments, how to remember assignments, when to start assignments, how to remember to bring homework back to school, and so on. There are actually a lot of skills that must be taught if you want students to be able to complete their work once they have become more motivated to do so.

 

2. Take Out Talk-Outs

Your students may feel that they can talk out at will, and say whatever they want whenever they want, even though you have set a different standard for your classroom. To convincingly teach children and youth that talk-outs are a problem, reverse roles. Have a young person assume the job of teacher, for example, and then have that youth attempt to complete an easy task such as teaching the class to remember a five digit number– but the task will be tough to accomplish amidst many talk-outs. Offer the role play teacher a big prize for successfully completing the task, but coach the other students to talk out at will. The role-play teacher will be unable to successfully complete the task. Ask the class to suggest a rule regarding the amount of talk-outs.

BONUS METHOD: Students do not magically know how many times to talk out in your class or group. Plus, many of them lack the skills to discern it on their own– so be sure to have every group or class set a standard. It is unfair to expect youngsters to adhere to a standard that is unquantified.

 

3. How Do You Get Help Around Here?

Students don't start the school year magically knowing how to ask for help. This frequent event can become an on-going classroom nightmare when students don't know how to appropriately perform this basic classroom skill. Some students may believe that it's okay to act out when they're frustrated or want help. Turn that around with this fun intervention. Ask the students to devise "The Top 10 Ways the Teacher Can't Tell You Need Help." Elicit answers like: you glare, you mutter, and you run out of the room.

 

4. Who is Supposed to Be in Charge?

Some young people act like they are in charge. To provide clarification, ask the group to name all the qualifications that teachers, counselors, coaches– or whatever your job is– are supposed to have. List their responses on the board, eliciting answers like "a college degree" and "a teaching license." After the list is complete, have the group determine who has those qualifications, the adult or a student.

 

5. Pay Attention to This

Most teachers expect students to pay attention–classroom management strategies without ever teaching exactly how to do that, or why students should even comply with that expectation. Start by motivating students to see the importance of establishing and maintaining focus. To do so, have your students list all the jobs and businesses that they may wish to do. Write their responses in a column on the board. Ask your group to determine the potential consequences of inattention in those occupations. Write those answers in a second column. Encourage the group to craft amusing and dramatic answers that will convince students of the importance of staying focused. For example, have your students identify exactly what is likely to happen if a surgeon or truck driver is inattentive.

BONUS METHOD: To teach your students that being in the bathroom instead of the classroom has consequences, view the image shown at right. You can use the text shown on Poster #226 as verbiage. To view the poster enlarged, click on the image.

 

Get hundreds more classroom management methods
in our live Breakthrough Strategies Workshops
coming soon to Portland, Los Angeles and Seattle

Scholarships: 1.800.545.5736

 

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    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

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    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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