What You Need to Know About How to Prevent Bullying But Were Never Taught

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

What You Need to Know About How to Prevent Bullying
But Were Never Taught

 
 

 

teacher workshopGot bullies? We've got better strategies to prevent bullying.

This is author and workshop instructor Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I've got some great tips and tools for you on how to prevent bullying in your school, agency or center.

In our professional development workshops, we always ask participants to identify the top cause of school shootings. Bullying is usually named. There is no doubt that bullying is a huge problem in nearly any setting where children and youth congregate, but you won't be able to stop or moderate bullying by focusing on that issue alone.

Yet, often that is what happens. When youth professionals focus solely or primarily on bullying, it may be a bit like seeing the forest but not the trees. Or, perhaps another analogy– one that might resonate especially well with mental health workers– is that a primary focus on bullying is a lot like just focusing on an alcoholic's liquor consumption while neglecting to address any factors that caused the excessive drinking in the first place.

Here is a completely different way of viewing and addressing bullying, one that you may find far more effective than conventional approaches that focus on the symptom of bullying while overlooking the factors that cause and sustain it. Read on to discover the real truth about how to prevent bullying.
 

The Truth About How to Prevent Bullying
 

MYTH

To address bullying, use character education or values clarification approaches.

TRUTH

While character education and values clarification approaches can have merit, as a reader of this internet magazine, hopefully you have learned that these methods always fail with about 11-14% of youngsters. Do you remember the information presented in past issues on this topic? If you have been to our workshop, you definitely should know the truth on this topic, because we devote hours to it during class. As any of our workshop past participants should be able to tell you, character ed and values clarification approaches always fail with conduct disordered youth.

These are the students we covered in Issues 2 and 3 of this magazine. As you may recall from those articles, these youngsters lack a conscience or remorse, so character ed and values clarification simply won't work since those methods require that the child be able to care and have compassion.

Since conduct disorders are the most misbehaved students of all, they are also often your bullies. Now, you know why conventional approaches may have limited success reducing bullying. To get better results, switch to methods designed to work with conduct disorders.

To review our introduction to click on the Blog link at the top of the page and choose the Introductory Issues.

 

MYTH

Bullying is the primary cause of school shootings.

TRUTH

The media loves simple, black and white explanations, and this very simplistic sound bite is just not a very accurate or thorough explanation. While some school shooters were partially motivated by being bullied, to zero in on just the bullying misses the point– and misses the point on how to prevent an incident.

A more accurate way of viewing these youngsters who shoot, is to note that they tend to be clinically depressed, and that in addition to the bullying that they may endure, they are very sad and extremely frustrated.

Better than viewing them as worn down by the bullying, it is far more accurate to view them as worn down by many things. Let me explain why this distinction is so important. This distinction is critical because it doesn't require an act of bullying to set this child off. Like a pressure cooker, this student is building up to blow.

Certainly bullying could be the thing that causes the blow up, but it could be any event that lights the fuse. When you train your attention on seriously depressed youth (who may be bullied a lot, irregularly, or not at all) you can more readily and precisely identify the youth who could some day explode.

Further, there may be other populations of youth who are statistically far more likely to cause an extremely violent incident. However, if three– not just one– types of youngsters are at highest risk of violence, that's a more complicated idea, a complex assertion that the popular media may never fully appreciate and disseminate.

Although you won't hear it in the media, the bullied child is probably not the youngster at highest risk of extreme violence. Want more than headlines? Check out our book, All the Best Answers Conduct Disorders and Anti-Social Youth. It is available as a book, ebook or online video class.

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MYTH

When teaching bullying prevention, keep the focus on the bullying.


TRUTH

poster to prevent bullyingWhile it is fine to focus directly on the bullying, if you stop there, you may be unhappy with the results. To stick with the analogy used earlier, it is like focusing on the amount of liquor consumed rather than helping the alcoholic to understand why he drinks excessively.

In addition to  teaching that bullying is wrong, there needs to be a greater focus on teaching the skills youngsters need to behave differently. Further, you need to modify the skills of not just the bully, but also the victims and peers.

Typically, we do not necessarily provide specific skill instruction to all three of those groups. The bully needs training to learn new peer interaction skills, but so do the victims and bystanders. If you focus solely on one or two of those groups, you may not get the results you sought.

Remember, teaching skills does not mean re-stating expectations or rules. Teaching skills means that you creatively and effectively show students the exact skills that they need to be different. So, for example, you might teach the bully some new "Opening Lines" to use when initiating peer contact, perhaps aiding the youngster to stop threatening, and instead say something less aggressive.

Here are other key areas that are often not taught as part of bullying prevention programs: personal space and distance, interacting with peers who are different, managing hands and other body parts, and how to avoid peer set-ups.

There are many more critical skill areas that often are overlooked and left unaddressed, including motivating bullies to stop bullying. All unaddressed areas will be an endless source of bullying problems so be sure you cover it all. Skill training doesn't have to be boring.

For example, to motivate bullies to be different, you can use inovative, humorous interventions like our popular bullying prevention posters (click.) Poster #100 is shown above.

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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

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Work Refusers: Strategies That Work

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Work Refusers:
Remedies That Work

 
 

 

professional development trainer Ruth Herman WellsI bet you know some work refusers. This is professional development trainer Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. and this student is my specialty. I have dozens and dozens of strategies for you.

Our Live Expert Help (click the icon at bottom right on any website page, or call 1.800.545.5736) gets more requests for help with this child than almost any other.

These days, every teacher, every counselor, every social worker, every principal knows students who won't do their work. Some of these work refusers often fail to show up. When they do show up, they often say little, and some may be nearly mute. Some may not even make eye contact, or even look in your direction.

Typically, adults consider two options: pushing the child or backing off. All types of "pushing" can fail, whether rewards, consequences, pressure or logic are used. Backing off can't ever work because if you back off then you're not offering the child an education, or whatever your service is.

The world demands skills from every one of us. No exceptions are made for those who endured abuse or neglect, or have a good reason to seize up. We spend hours thoroughly covering work refusers in our workshop, and can't fit all that comprehensive, step-by-step guidance here, but we'll give you some key tips. Consider coming to our workshop if you want more than just the starters offered here. Learn more about our professional development workshops here. Start reading a few of our best insider tips and tricks for work refusers below.
 


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Classroom Management Problems STOP here


 

Strategies to Help Work Refusers

 

It's Pain, Not a Game

Many work refusers face enormous challenges from severe family problems like violence or verbal abuse, to challenges like disabilities and emotional disorders. Work refusal can appear to be a game, but especially with victimized youngsters, it's not a game at all. Getting "stuck" is the only way they know to survive. It can keep them safe at home, and that survival mechanism comes in with them every day.

Strategy:
Few kids will ever say "I was beaten last night so math seems irrelevant. Can I skip the exam?" For distressed kids who don't wish to disclose the nature of their distress, simply allow them to say whether it's a "good work day" or "bad work day." How much work could you do after a beating? Deeply appreciative of accommodations, most of these traumatized students will work very hard on the days that they're able to.


You're a Life Line

You may be the only sane, sober adult some students know– a fact that you may want to keep in mind.

Strategy:
If you're a teacher, then you may live with on-going "testing mania," and other big pressures to produce results at school. It can be hard to remember that humanity is always more important than scores. Forget the humanity, you won't get good scores. Remember the humanity, you'll maximize your humans and their scores.

 

Tiny Increments

Traumatized kids have so little energy left for school: Surviving the beatings, homelessness, or neglect can demand all the child's resources.

Strategy:
Raise expectations in tiny increments. If a student says your goals are too easy, that's just right. Aim for lots of small successes rather than a big failure followed by seizing up and absences.


Understand: Work Refusal Isn't the Real Problem

Look beyond the work refusal to improve it. Work refusal is almost always a symptom of a bigger problem. It is not the cause. It is not the problem. You can't cure problems by focusing on symptoms, which are merely manifestations of the problem. Symptoms like work refusal are not the cause, they are the result. Focus on just the refusal, you will never get improvement. Focus on the refusal AND the causes, you can get improvement.

Strategy: Ask students why they don't work. When many say "I don't know," reply: "If you did know, what would it be?" This off- beat method can yield important answers. Be ready to arrange help for the serious issues students cite.

 

Listen for What You Don't Hear

Consider this true story as a way to understand your potential impact on vulnerable children who refuse to work: "Mom hasn't moved in three days. I'm worried," the first grader said when asked why he wouldn't work. Tragically, upon investigation, the boy's Mom had passed without any adult knowing. Looking back, would you want to have taken the time to ask, or would you be satisfied that you had only focused on getting the work done? Playwright Harold Pinter, who died recently, once said "The speech we hear is an indication of that which we don't hear." For shut-down, withdrawn work refusers, it is critical that you listen for "that which we don't hear."

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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
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Depressed Children: Do You Know What to Do?

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Depressed Children

Do You Know What to Do?

 
 

 

This is a rough time for many families. That is why this issue will focus on ideas for helping children who are sad and depressed.

Since depression often worsens around holiday time, it is always a good idea to be especially vigilant during November and December.

Be sure to carefully watch over any children and teens who show signs of sadness, isolation, withdrawal, distress, or other marked changes in behavior. If you are not a counselor, be sure to seek help if you have any safety concerns about a child or teen; these strategies are not a substitute for that.
 

Strategies for Depressed Children and Teens
 

Yesterday Once More
When children and youth spend a lot of the present being very upset about problems from the past, ask them to "bloom where you're planted."

Power Walk
Vigorous exercise can have almost a magical effect on depressed children and teens. Studies have consistently shown that exercise is one of the top three things that can help a child or youth stay ahead of depression. Don't forget that if you are not a clinician, be sure to immediately seek mental health guidance if you have any safety concerns about a depressed child. It is always better to play it safe as the severity of a youngster's depression is often not readily apparent.

Power Talk
Talk is the other intervention that studies have shown to be potentially quite useful to help depressed children and adolescents moderate the amount of sadness they are experiencing. We recommend that you combine this intervention with the preceding method– exercise. For example, you and the student can walk rapidly around your site while the child gets to talk about any issues that may be of concern. You can "Power Talk while you Power Walk". Children who "talk it out", are far less likely to "act it out". They are also less likely to "act it in"– to hurt themselves with behaviors such as self-harm, self-endangering, substance abuse or other similar self-destructive actions. Depression can be both acted out and acted in. We tend to think of depression as just being acted in, but it can be either.

For Right Now
For children who are sad about things from the past or future, ask them "What's wrong with this moment?" If they say that nothing is wrong right now, then ask them "Why would you waste the present worrying about what's done…or what may never happen?" Assist students to avoid squandering the present moment for a problematic past or potentially problematic future.


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Depression Solves What?
For children and adolescents who are often mired in depression, ask them to tell you exactly what depression solves. Assist the students to understand that depression solves nothing, and can make things worse when the child neglects responsibilities or shirks work due to sadness.

Cancel Stinkin' Thinking
Now that you have your students realizing that depression never solves anything, teach them to notice and stop depressing thoughts by thinking "Cancel" whenever they notice negative thinking. You can call the negative thinking "stinkin' thinking." If depressed students protest that they will never be able to turn off all the negative thoughts, reassure them that just noticing the negative thinking is a huge first step. "Sell" the idea of reducing negative thinking by emphasizing that depressed students will be probably more comfortable and experience less pain by simply reducing the amount of negative thoughts.

Take Action
Train depressed students to take an action rather than just wallow in sadness. This intervention is the perfect follow-up to the two approaches shown immediately above.

Depression Time
For depressed students who really hesitate to take steps to stop their negative thoughts, suggest to these youngsters that they simply try to reduce the number of minutes spent on negativity. Next, point out that there will always be plenty of time to be depressed later, that students aren't giving up anything, they can always choose to be sad again later. Alternatively, have depressed students determine how many minutes per day they spend dwelling on sad thoughts, then have them reduce the time by a percentage that is acceptable to them.

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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Interventions to Prevent Public Displays of Affection: School Isn’t Just for Dating Anymore

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

School Isn't Just for Dating Anymore
Interventions to Prevent Public Displays of Affection:

 

 

If your students believe that your site exists just for dating purposes, we've got some delightfully different, unusually effective interventions that you may want to use right away.

If you are tired of the constant public displays of affection (PDA) that don't belong in a school or agency setting, our new interventions can help. Because these new methods rely heavily on humor, they may work much better than conventional approaches.

 

Methods to Stop

Public Displays of Affection in School

 

This Just In! School Isn't Just for Dating Anymore

display of affection poster 120 If every day at your site feels like date night, this funny handout will prompt discussion about PDAs.  It's Poster #120.

After reading through the handout text with your group, start a discussion of the role of your site.

Assist students to identify the mission of your site. Aid the group to notice that your goal is to prepare youngsters for the future, not for date night.

 

You're Not at the Movies

social skills poster 118When adults confront students about inappropriate displays of affection, students often become angry, argumentative and disagreeable.

The best way to avoid that type of reaction is humor.

This funny resource can provide that humor. It's Poster #118.

To avoid some of the arguing, emphasize to students that you are only concerned about "the right time and right place" for dating activities, that you are not against dating activities in the correct setting. Assist students to determine that the cinema is an appropriate setting but your site is not.

 


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Exit the Hormone Zone

pda poster for school 121It's not even close to spring but you may already feel like you work in the Hormone Zone.

Conventional, straight-forward interventions may not help the situation. Give this humorous alternative a try instead.

Label your classroom or group room a No Cuddle Zone.

You can have students create signs to warn all who pass through the door that they've entered a No Cuddle Zone. Our Poster #121 can provide an example.
 

But Everyone Does It

One of the most common excuses students offer for engaging in PDAs is that "everyone is doing it too". That's hardly true. Help your students discover that for themselves.

Here is a most engaging and provocative way to convey that reality. When students say that "everyone else is doing it," ask students if their parents act that way. Most students groan and say they would never want to be around their parents acting like that.

Once students have that insight, turn the tables on them, and note that parents, siblings, peers, teachers, and many others prefer not to watch students' PDAs every bit as much as students prefer not to watch parental affection.

Be sure to use this intervention very carefully as it could unintentionally strike a nerve in children with family problems. This intervention should be done with great lightness and lots of humor to avoid that.

An important tip to avoid problems: Rather than have children think about their own parents, have them think about parents in general. Unless you are 100% sure that you can use this device successfully, skip it entirely. If you want to use this strategy without risk, change "parents" to specific other adults like pilots, plumbers, or cashiers, and have students identify if these adults are engaging in PDA on the job.

 

Work Place Kissy Face

Students are often quick to assert that your site's rules regarding PDA are unrealistic, outmoded and out-of-date. When students make that claim, reply that they might be right.

Next, note that since your job is to prepare students for the real world, all your rules mirror the major employers in the region. Ask students to identify major employers in the region and their standards for PDA.

Students will quickly discover how few work sites permit dating activities during what is supposed to be work time. Be sure to conclude the discussion by noting that as soon as the biggest employers in your region schedules daily Coffee and Kiss breaks, your site will too.

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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


School Violence Prevention: What You Don’t Know About Violent Students Can Hurt You

 

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School Violence Prevention:
What You Don't Know About Violent Students Can Hurt You

 
 

 

School has only been in session a short time, and our new Classroom Management Help Forum and Live Expert Help areas (click the Live Help icon at the bottom of the page) are being inundated with requests for aid for just a single problem area: violent students

Frankly, we are very concerned to be getting so many requests for help with violent students who are verbally abusing, defying or hitting their teacher. Yes, that sentence included the phrase "hitting their teacher."

 


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Even though you may not want to hear this, if you don't have basic, mental health-based, violence prevention training, you are at risk of facing a serious violent act, potentially, even something like the recent school shootings.

If you have been to one of our workshops (click), or been a careful reader of this Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog, you already know that conventional interventions always fail with the most out-of-control, violent students.

If you have ever found that "nothing works" to control some students, that is because standard school violence prevention methods are never effective tools to manage this population.

In the first issues of this magazine, you should have read about how very critical it is to use different violence prevention strategies with these most out-of-control youth and children. If you don't recognize the term "conduct disorder," click on the Blog menu at the top of the page to re-visit those Introductory articles and get at least a portion of those must-have violence prevention basics.

The techniques shown below are predicated on you having the basic training on violence prevention that was offered in preceding issues. Those techniques start in the section below.
 

Must-Know

School Violence Prevention Methods

 

Self-Control Has No On/Off Button

Extremely aggressive students often claim to have self-control that they are simply choosing not to use.

If you have been to one of our workshops, you know that claim is a classic manipulation. Here is an excellent intervention to use in response.

When a student says that he does not need to improve his self-control now, that he will just do it later in his "real job," or when he is grown, ask the student how he will get those skills. When the student claims he will just be able to "just do it", ask him to show that ability now.

Most students perform quite poorly. Next, ask the student: What will be any different in his "real job" or when he is grown? Your goal is to aid the youngster to realize that he can't instantly develop and use self-control.

Teach him that there is no on/off self-control button– that he needs to learn and practice self-control to have it.

 

Follow Your Inner Cop

If you understand severely out-of-control youth and children like conduct disorders, you know that they lack a conscience.

Yet, a conscience is the most powerful force to help people stay in control. Trevor, a participant in our Portland workshop last week, suggests a method that can help. Trevor teaches conduct disorders to have an "Inner Cop" or else face the consequences instigated by an "Outer Cop."

This device won't compensate for the lack of a conscience but can provide a substitute, internal mechanism that helps.

 

Meet the Tantrumming Hair Dresser

Relate self-control problems to students' goals. Use some of our popular multiple choice quizzes, with questions like this one from our Temper and Tantrum Tamer book (click to view):

Kwan Lee tantrums when mad. She wants to be a hair dresser. She'll discover that when she screams and turns red with rage,

a) Customers don't even notice

b) Customers walk out really fast

c) Customers will come from all over the region to have their hair cut and styled by the tantrumming hair dresser.
 

Thinking is Highly Over-Rated

Construct a red stop sign and mount it on a ruler, but instead of just having the word "Stop" on the sign, put "Stop and Think."

Drill students on managing their reactions to anger-provoking and potentially violent situations by role- playing.

Use the "Stop and Think" sign to freeze the action so you can cue the student on behaviors to use or avoid. Use this device to confront the classic manipulation severely misbehaved students offer: "I didn't have time to think."


Jocks in Jail

Ask the students to play "Jocks in Jail," and consider what has happened recently to famous athletes who thought they could act however they wanted.

The goal is to help severely misbehaved students understand that they may face huge consequences for misbehavior.

Since these youngsters lack a conscience, it is critical to use methods like this device that offers external control to compensate for the lack of internal self-regulation.

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Improve Students’ Attitudes: Behavior Problems Solved Here

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Improve Students' Attitudes:
Behavior Problems Solved Here 

 

 

Got Kid Problems? Our web site can help. And, it can help better than ever before because it is now twice as big, with twice as many resources to improve bad behavior, disrespect, and negative students' attitudes.

Even better, most of these state-of-the-art, attention-grabbing, more effective resources are still free to use.

Chances are that your solution is just a few clicks away– if only you knew where to look. That's what this issue is all about. This is your resource guide to some of the newest and best resources to turnaround problems like bad attitudes, poor motivation, classroom management concerns, violence, bad behavior, work refusal, and much more.

Teaching and counseling troubled youth and children is hard, but our new web site resources can make it easier. We're standing right next to you in your classroom or office, and we're ready to help.

 

Strategies to Improve Students' Attitudes and Behavior

 

"What Do I Do Now?!"
More Free Articles to Guide You

The next time you don't know where to turn, turn to our free treasure trove of Blogs, accessible on the menu at the top of every page on the site.

We've posted dozens of articles answering "What do I do now?" about work refusers, violent students, classroom management, truancy, absenteeism, bad behavior, surly attitudes, and much more.

Our articles are mostly theory-free, showing you exactly what to do instead. When theory lets you down, let us show you real-world approaches that work better than theory.

 

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For Subscribers Only

We know you have a bad budget so we've developed worksheets for teachers creative ways to supply you with resources when you don't have much budget.

We have a special area reserved for subscribers to this Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog. It is packed with free worksheets you can use right away.

It has wonderful resources to turnaround bad attitudes, bad behavior, poor motivation, and so many other classroom and behavior management problems.

Reach our special subscriber Free Worksheets area here.

 

 


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More Choices, Better Access
to Free Expert Help

Wish you knew lots of experts on problem children and youth? Now you do!

We have our free Live Expert Help for Youth Professionals area. You can reach it by clicking the Live Help icon at the bottom right of every page on this site. It is just for teachers, principals, teaching assistants, school counselors, and other school staff members.

 

Thousands of Strategies for
Thousands of Problems

For every behavioral, emotional, or attitude problem you see in your classroom or office, our website has answers. From ADD to Zero Interest in School, our site always has the newest methods, explanations, handouts, and lessons.

If you need help locating the exact resource you need on our huge site, call or email.

 

Bonus Strategies to
Improve Students' Attitudes

In addition to all the free resources, listed above, here is a bonus freebie on improving negative student attitudes.

 

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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
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    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


The 7 Best New School Success Strategies for 2007: Creative Methods to Jump-Start Your Students’ New Year

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

The 7 Best New School Success Strategies for 2007:

  Creative Methods to Jump-Start Your Students' New Year

 
 

 

Here are some brand new interventions for the brand new year. All these devices offer you exciting new methods to build school success this year.

 

School Success Strategies That Work Best

 

Do You Know Where You're Going?

student success activityGive students pictures of a luggage tag. (You can use the one shown if wish. Just click "Save as" then save it. Next, print it from nearly any word processing or graphics program. You can also alter it using those programs if you wish.)

You can cut out the tag to look like an actual luggage tag if you want. Tell students that they are beginning a trip. Tell them that it is a trip through life. Ask students to write down on the luggage tag exactly where they will end up.

Many students will insist that they don't know for sure. You can reply "If you don't know where you're going, then you should be sure to take with you everything you could possibly need. Do you agree?"

Most students will agree that they should take everything from a bikini to a winter coat so they will be ready to function wherever they arrive. Once students acknowledge the need to take everything they might need, let them expand on their assertions, emphatically noting how vulnerable a person might be without that winter coat or without that passport.

Next, write on the board: "Don't Know Where You're Going? Education Will Take You There." (Other options: "Education: Don't Leave Home Without It" and "Education: Will You Have It When You Need It?") Discuss with students if they don't know exactly where they are going, might education be needed when they arrive?

 

Can You Pay the Cost of Living?

It's expensive just to live. Dropouts and people with less education and skills often earn minimum wage, currently $5.15 per hour in many states.

Help your students to do a little math. Based on the current estimated cost of living of $40,000 for an urban family of four, a minimum wage worker must work 150 hours per week–  but there are only 168 hours in a week. That means working all but 2-1/2 hours of every day!

motivation book If instead, two adults in the family both work at minimum wage, each must work 75 hours a week, or about 11 hours per day, way more than a typical eight hour day.

To potently convey the concept to students who think a school day is long, have them imagine going to school from 8 AM to 7 PM seven days a week.

This intervention works best if you help your students discover these facts by doing the math with them. Consider adding in this last fact once you have thoroughly discussed this data.

Note that the numbers are actually worse than indicated because they do not include the tax burden that shaves about one-third off of take-home pay. That fact, offered late in the game, can really get students' attention. Learn more about the book shown above, Maximum-Strength Motivation-Makers. It's available as a book or instant ebook, and has dozens more innovative, motivational strategies like the ones listed here.

 

The Cost of Staying Alive

This intervention is the perfect follow-up to the preceding strategy. Put this statement on the board, then discuss: The average cost of health care is $300 per month, then it gets expensive.

This data is based on a family of four. To adjust this data for smaller families, you can deduct only a small amount– just 10% per person. Ouch. It can be expensive to just stay alive. Be sure your students discover this.


Suggest an Issue Topic

We hope you're liking this issue on school success strategies. We love getting subscriber and workshop participant suggestions like the one that prompted the topic for this issue. Email your ideas for future topics.
 

Like Trying to Tame the Ocean

This intervention is for students who attempt the impossible. For example, a youngster can strive to fix their deeply troubled family, or a student may want to undo his family's recent move to a new state.

This school success intervention is to help students to consider letting go of things that they can not change or improve anyway. To use this device, ask the student if they would ever try to control the ocean. The student will say that no one can control the ocean.

After you receive that response, you can let the student know that their efforts are the equivalent of trying to tame the ocean of its waves. Instead battling the ocean, encourage young people to ride the waves so they end up in a new and better place.


Where to Keep Your Diploma

This school success intervention can be used in an off-the-cuff manner, or you can have students make posters to illustrate it. Be sure to put the completed posters on the wall as on-going motivators.

The idea is based on the fact that grads earn $329,000 more than dropouts per lifetime. Teach your students– "Your diploma: So valuable, it belongs in your wallet."

 


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No Such Thing Called Regret

There are so many times that youngsters decide to engage in problematic behavior only to then later express regret about their decision. Certainly expressions of regret are important, but you may be troubled when the regret appears to be offered as a way to moderate or avoid the normal consequences.

Here is a wonderful conversation starter from a practicum student at a girls' residential treatment center. I'll let her explain: "I don't believe in the word regret. It allows you to cover up your choices with that one word. I feel like it allows you to not own up to what you did. If I punch someone in the face, they may hit me back, I regret that I got hit back…You can't have your cake and eat it too."

While this school success intervention will only work with students who can process abstract information, it can be the start of an intriguing discussion. You may want to have your group advise you on how regret should be considered in decisions to moderate– or not moderate– consequences. You can relate this discussion to how the "real world" reacts to expressions of regret.

If you decide to incorporate references to some of the recent incidents involving well-publicized celebrity misbehavior, that could draw a broader range of students into the discussion.

 

Have Happy New School Year

This intervention isn't new but it is such a good intervention that we do like to give it out annually. This device is designed for youth who are negative or discouraged about school. (This device can be altered to work in treatment centers and other settings by simply changing the focus from school to your setting.)

Because it is the start of a new year, hold a Happy New School Year party. Don't just have a party; be sure to make new school year resolutions. Have paper ready so the students can write down specific commitments for the new year that they are ready to make.

It is very hard to be negative and sour when you are "toasting" your school success resolutions. To be creative, you can have the students insert the resolutions into balloons, then blow the balloons up and release. (Be sure to be release the balloons indoors or in a way that won't damage the environment.)

You can also have students make small wooden boats out of popsicle sticks or wood scraps, then put the resolutions on the boats. Next, release the boats on a lake or other body of water.

What a lovely way to help students care about success in school.

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


What Every Youth Professional Must Know About Violent Students, Part 2

 

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What Every Youth Professional
Must Know About Violent Students

Part 2 of 2

 

 

school violencePart 2 of 2

workshop presenter Ruth Herman WellsHere is Part 2 of 2 sections of this important article on violence prevention.

It is part of the intial three introductory articles inYouth Change Workshops' Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog.

I'm author, keynote speaker and workshop trainer Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. If you missed Part 1, find it here.

This is Part 2 of 2 sections on student violence prevention. Feel free to share this critical, must-know safety information about violent students, with your colleagues and administrators.

Recap of Part 1


In the last issue, we explained the term "conduct disorder", and gave an introduction to this youngster, who is perhaps at highest risk of extreme violence. The first part of this article emphasized how you must work differently with CDs compared to any other kids. Hopefully, we successfully conveyed how critical it is to work with CDs differently than everyone else, or risk finding yourself or others in dangerous situations. Hopefully, we also successfully emphasized how important it is for non-mental health workers who are new to the concept of conduct disorder, to thoroughly update their skills for working with these hard-to-manage youth.
 

Students at 2nd and 3rd Risk of Extreme Violence


These youth are not nearly at as great a risk as the child with conduct disorder. We will cover each of these 2 types of youth separately, but must stress that the risk for both of these 2 groups drops off from that posed by conduct disorders. Of course, remember that when any child appears to be potentially violent, you take that concern seriously, regardless of whether the child was on our list. This list is meant only to guide you when you lack any specific events or circumstances that show you how to apportion your time, supervision and other resources to best maximize your violence prevention efforts.

 

Thought Disorders

The risk posed by children who have thought disorder, is probably far less than that of conduct disordered youth. Part of the explanation is that there are probably a lot more conduct disordered kids than thought disordered ones. The other reason that explains the somewhat distant #2 status is that the thought disordered child may be well-intentioned, kind, and loving at times. These children do have consciences. The child with conduct disorder is really never is able to care about anyone else. Another reason to explain the distant #2 status is that often the thought disordered child will act in rather than act out. In terms of violence prevention, that means they probably pose more of a threat to self rather than others.

Unless you work in a treatment setting, just a very small fraction of the children you work with, may have what mental health professionals call a thought disorder. Like diagnosing conduct disorder, thought disorder can only be determined by a mental health professional. A lay person can do grave harm attempting to diagnose mental health disorders. While the thinking of the conduct disorder is clear and lucid, that assumption is not always true for the thought-disordered child. The child who has been diagnosed with this type of problem by a mental health worker, has very serious problems with their thinking. The child may hear voices or see visions that no one else can, for example. The child may believe demons or devils are governing them. If the voices, for instance, tell the child to hurt someone, then the child may feel compelled to do it. As for the implications for violence prevention, this is where potential danger could lie.

The thrust of working with a diagnosed thought disorder on proper medication, although focusing on skill building and structure are also important. The single most important concern will be that the child takes any prescribed medication regularly and properly, because when properly medicated, this child may function almost normally in many ways. When not correctly medicated, this child is at the mercy of any demons, visions, voices or upsetting thoughts that pop into their head.

 

Severely Agitated, Depressed Kids

The occurrence of extreme violence by severely depressed, agitated children probably also greatly lags behind the risk posed by conduct disorders. This term refers to a child who has experienced extremely severe problems with depression, and also struggles mightily at least once with agitation. Many kids, especially teens, struggle with depression, but this group endures some of the most prolonged, profound, deep depression; this should not be confused with typical adolescent ups and downs.

Crisis, sudden changes and the usual adolescent successes and failures can quickly de-stabilize this child who is already seriously struggling. This youngster is very vulnerable to more minor vicissitudes, meaning that the youngster can blow up in reaction to moderate set-backs. Often, it is "the straw that broke the camel's back" that can light the fuse. Bullying can be the source of the blow-up, but it can be almost anything that triggers this youngster. Like all the other disorders discussed here, only mental health professionals can diagnose severe depression. Consult one if needed. When facing violence prevention concerns with this child– or any other student– always seek immediate, expert help if you are even a bit unsure how to proceed.

Any emotion that a child has trouble managing may get acted out or acted in. Depression is generally acted in. Many view it as anger turned inward: the child withdraws, reduces their activities, may eat less, etc. But, depression can also be acted out. Feeling cornered, unable to endure any more pain, some children will act out, sometimes lashing out in very severe ways.

All things in nature strive to come to a conclusion. Storms eventually dissipate, the rain ultimately gives way to sun, and even the snow will eventually end. Humans, as part of nature, also tend to move towards resolution. For some children, extreme violence can be the flash point that offers that resolution. When there appears to be no hope, perhaps the child believes that there is nothing left to lose.

Depression can be tough on adults, but couple the depression with a child's lack of time concept, lack of perspective, their impulsiveness, immaturity, and resistance to understanding the link of actions to final outcomes, extreme violence can seem to be a solution. If this vulnerable child becomes involved with a conduct disordered peer, you can see how under certain circumstances, that could become a deadly combination as the depressed, agitated child may join in the acting-out.

To help this child, alleviating some of the torment will be critical. Help to manage anger in socially acceptable ways, tempering the depression, and alleviating some of the agitation can keep this child from remaining at the level of extreme discomfort they currently experience. If this child receives useful aid to vent the agitation and can find some tempering of the depression, any risk of extreme violence can be significantly impacted.

Of the three risk categories, this group's concerns are potentially the most amenable to intervention by you, and is of the three, the most hopeful diagnosis. You can have much lasting impact on this child. The three best interventions: Talking out problems, exercising and possibly anti-depressants.

 

Appraising the Risk

Now you can look at your class or group and not just wonder where the where potential, serious danger could come from. Now that you have more refined guesses about which youth potentially pose potential danger, here is a way to better rank that risk in your mind. A juvenile court judge in Springfield, Oregon, said after the shooting there, "These kids are like little match sticks waiting to be lit." To adapt that image a bit, here is how you can apply that thinking to the three at-risk groups listed here.

You can imagine that the conduct disorder is already lit; a flame is burning. Whether that flame becomes smaller, flares larger, or creates an inferno, is anyone's guess, but the flame is burning always, the potential for disaster is always there.

The thought-disordered child may be like a pilot light, a tiny flame that is always lit, but is fairly unlikely to inexplicably get massively bigger or out of control. Properly shepherded and assisted, this light may stay forever just a benign flicker. Unshepherded or inadequately assisted, however, this flame can get bigger, even flare out of control.

The extremely agitated depressed child may be the unlit match stick that the judge visualized. Outside factors will likely come into play to incite any flare-up. Outside forces could include peer pressure, bullying, crises, substance abuse, family woes, or just mounting problems that fuel the agitation and create a profound, all-encompassing sense of desperation that leads the child to "spontaneously" combust. Like the thought-disordered child, the severely agitated depressed youth can often be so readily aided if the community can identify them, then consistently care and effectively intervene.

In Summary

If you work with kids, but you are not a mental health professional, maybe it's time to at least learn some of the basics about children's mental health. And, no matter what your role with children, please consider it your obligation to train your kids to be peaceful. That may be the most important contribution you could make in a world that so thoroughly ensures that every child knows so much about extreme violence, and so little about anything peaceful.


For More Information on Violence Prevention:

Be sure to visit the web site for more information you can access right now. If you do come to our Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop, we'll spend as much time on this complicated child as you want. Or, you can arrange an on-site workshop presentation on violent students held at your site for your staff.

webtitlesNeed an online alternative? Our Control the Uncontrollable Students Online Class has what you need, plus 1 free clock hour.

Conduct disorder book If you prefer to read, check out our All the Best Answers for the Worst Kid Problems: Conduct Disorders and Anti-Social Youth book or ebook.
 

 

Previous Behavior and Classroom Management Blog Issue:

The 3 Types of Students at Highest Risk of Extreme Violence (Part 1)

 

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    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


What Every Youth Professional Must Know About Violent Students

 

classroom management blog


What Every Youth Professional
Must Know About Violent Students

Part 1 of 2

 

 

violent studentPart 1 of 2

workshop presenter Ruth Herman WellsThis is author, keynote speaker and workshop trainer Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. This article is one of the most important I've ever written. That is why we are making it one of our introductory articles for Youth Change Workshops' Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog.

This is Part 1 of 2 sections. Feel free to share this critical, must-know safety information about violent students, with your colleagues and administrators.

There are three types of kids who may be at the highest risk of extreme violence. Obviously, you must take seriously any threat or indication of danger from any kid, so if a dangerous child you know doesn't fit one of these categories, please don't just breathe a sigh of relief. Rather, the point of emphasizing these three top-risk youth, is to have you apportion your time wisely. You can't monitor each child equally. This information may guide you on who you monitor most closely, especially in the absence of other events or information to guide you.

In this space, we will have time to cover only one of these violent students in any kind of detail. We will cover the second two types of students in the third issue of this magazine, plus we'll expand a bit on the information covered here. Our information on the 3 most violent students was first published by The Child Welfare Report in 1998, and is updated and revised here.

The youth at highest risk of extreme violence may be the conduct disordered child. If you don't already know this term, visualize the fictional character, J.R. from the TV show "Dallas" because the hallmark of being a conduct disorder (CD), is having no heart, no conscience, no remorse.

Only a mental health professional can diagnose a conduct disorder for sure, but being aware that you may have a conduct disordered child in your class or group, is important to ensuring your safety, along with the safety of your students, because you work with conduct disorders completely differently than other kids. Since the child with CD has no conscience or relationship capacity, you should not use relationship-based approaches with a diagnosed conduct disorder.

It would be insensitive to call a conduct disorder a "baby sociopath," but that is close to what the term means. It means that the child acts in ways that appear to be seriously anti-social, and the concern is that the child may grow up to be a sociopathic type of person.

Since this child cares only about himself (CDs are predominately male), there are little brakes slowing this child from doing serious or extreme violence. Not every conduct disordered child will engage in horrific behavior. There is a range of misbehavior student with CD may get involved with, ranging from lying to setting fires or being a sexual predator. At the most serious end of the spectrum, lies the possibility of extreme violence, such as a school shooting. Sadly, youth with CD are often your violent students.

Conduct disorder book violent student workshopIn our workshop, we spend at least several hours helping you understand how to work with students with conduct disorder. You can come to one of our workshops, get the workshop online  or get some of our books or ebooks  that teach you how to work with this most hard-to-manage, violent student. But do something to make sure you thoroughly understand how to work completely differently with this violent student than any other child. Your safety– and that of your students– depends on how well you understand and manage these potentially violent youngsters.
 

Methods for Conduct Disordered Youth

There's not space for all the critical do's and don't's that you must know but here are some of the most important to give you a bit of an introduction to what you need to know:

DO

The main point we give in our classes is that these children operate on a cost-benefit system, and that to control your students with CD, you must keep the costs high, and benefits low. These children also especially need to pro-actively learn how to manage their fists, mouth, and actions. Your goal is to teach them that when they hurt others, it often hurts them too. All interventions must be in the context of "I-Me," because that is all this youngster is capable of caring about.

DON'T

There are so many "DON'Ts" that it's hard to know where to start. Even more problematic, many of the ordinary techniques that you use with other kids utterly fail with CDs, and are actually quite dangerous to use. Here are several of the most critical concerns to be aware of when you work with a diagnosed– that's the important word here– conduct disorder. Without the diagnosis, use these guides especially carefully. It's important to note that a little bit of information can be a dangerous thing, so be sure to upgrade your skills on CDs more thoroughly than reading this brief introduction. You can easily use our resources for this purpose. Since safety is always a serious concern when working with CDs, there is no substitute for learning more than the headlines listed here.

DON'T have a heart-to-heart relationship.

DON'T work on building trust.

DON'T rely on compassion, caring, empathy, values, morals.

DON'T expect compassionate behavior.

DON'T trust.

DON'T give second chances.

DON'T believe they care or feel remorse.

Hopefully this brief guide to the hardest-to-manage, most potentially dangerous youth will help you avoid using everyday interventions that will be unproductive, even dangerous. Hopefully this information will steer you towards relying on non-relationship-based interventions that emphasize learning skills like anger control, managing the fist, etc. along with firm rules, boundaries and limits.

 

For More Information on Violent Students:

Be sure to visit the web site for more information you can access right now. If you do come to our Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop, we'll spend as much time on this complicated child as you want. Or, you can arrange an on-site workshop presentation on violent students held at your site for your staff.

webtitlesNeed an online alternative? Our Control the Uncontrollable Students Online Class has what you need, plus 1 free clock hour.

Conduct disorder book If you prefer to read, check out our All the Best Answers for the Worst Kid Problems: Conduct Disorders and Anti-Social Youth book or ebook.
 

 

Next Behavior and Classroom Management Blog Issue:

2 More Types of Students at Highest Risk of Extreme Violence (Part 2)

 

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    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Welcome to the Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog

 

teacher blog


Welcome to the
 

Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog
 

K-12 Educational Articles

 

That Deliver the Best Answers to Turnaround Troubled and Problem Youth

 


workshop trainer Ruth Herman WellsWelcome to your first issue of Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog from Youth Change Workshops.

This blog is packed with articles that deliver dozens of interventions to turnaround problems like poor motivation, cyberbullying, bullying, trauma, bad attitudes, school failure, disrespect, bullying, work refusal, truancy, violence, withdrawal and much more.

My name is Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I am the director of Youth Change Workshops, and an author, trainer, columnist, keynote speaker and adjunct professor.

I created this blog especially for teachers, special educators, principals, social workers, school counselors, psychologists, foster parents, juvenile justice staff, detention workers, and child therapists.

This first issue is an introductory one, to get you acquainted with this blog, as well as our free sample worksheets and other behavior and classroom resource materials sent by postal mail.

This first blog issue also introduces you to our huge web site that is packed with hundreds of interventions and solutions to turnaround problem youth and children.
 

About
The Behavior and Classroom Management Blog

To quickly get some of our best strategies in your hands, if you subscribed to receive issues by email, you'll receive two more issues of our answer-packed blog in the next two weeks.

After that, issues will arrive in your email approximately every 3-4 weeks.

Each new blog issue will always deliver the newest and best strategies for your toughest "kid problems." If you ever have problems receiving or viewing a blog issue, all issues are posted online too.


About
The Sample Worksheets by Mail

student attendance worksheetWhen you subscribed to the Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver blog, you  also requested free written sample intervention materials.

Those free worksheets and resources should arrive soon by postal mail.

In that packet are two lesson worksheets ready to use with your students to turnaround problems like apathy, violence, truancy, school failure, cyberbullying, work refusal and more.

You'll also receive our catalog and workshop flyer.

We're sure that you'll find our behavior and classroom management interventions to be much more powerful and effective than conventional approaches.

 

About
The Web Site

Did you know that there are thousands of behavior and classroom management worksheets, lesson plans and strategies on our web site? If you need help, click Live Help at the bottom of the page, call 1.800.545.5736 or email. We have a huge site for you to explore, with every page devoted to the newest, best, and most powerful behavior and classroom management worksheets, resources and solutions for troubled youth and children.
 

About
Our Workshops, Books, eBooks, & Posters

behavior management book If you would like more than the sampling of strategies posted online and contained in our magazine, sign up for a live or online workshop, order some books or instant download ebooks. We can also bring our workshop to your site or conference.

We hope that the sampling of interventions offered on our site and in our blog will give you a good start on using our powerful, state-of-the-art methods to turnaround your troubled youth and children.

 

 

 

Marvelous Motivation-Making Strategies

Here are a few of our favorite motivation-makers to get you started with some exciting, new behavior and classroom management strategies. You'll get dozens of great, new strategies in each upcoming issue of the blog.


Choose More or Less Money

Ask students which they would rather earn: more or less money than everybody else. When the students say "more", tell them that each degree doubles their pay, noting that high school grads earn roughly twice what dropouts earn.

 

A Motivation-Maker for the Millennium

Jobs available to drop-outs will become less available in the new millennium, plus the jobs that drop-outs can do will decrease about 1/2% in salary each year. College grads should show a 1% annual increase in the new century, and jobs for college and high school grads should increase in number.
 

Five Frightening Financial Facts for Females

1-Females earn just 70% of males
2-No one earns less than a female drop-out
3-To earn the same or more than a male, a female must have a college degree
4- Girls who are teem moms are the most likely to drop out of school than anyone
5- Teen moms are the most likely to live in poverty and go on welfare, and they are the least likely to ever get off welfare

 

But I'll Always…

Have students name jobs they claim they can always do without a diploma, then ask them to imagine how that job could be automated or eliminated. Ask students to determine how many blacksmiths, outhouse builders, stage coach drivers and typewriter makers still exist.

 

Future Help Wanted

For students who say they can always just work at McDonald's, show them this future employment ad, actually expected to be a reality in just 5-10 years: "Fast Food Worker Wanted. Must have excellent computer skills and computer training or college degree. Will run large, automated McDonalds solo and must maintain complex computerized restaurant cooking and delivery system. Excellent salary."

 

A Joke?

Ask your students this question: What do you call a nerd in 5 years? Answer: "Boss."

 

What's a Diploma Worth?

motivational poster #9The next time one of your students says "A diploma is just a piece of paper," you can reply "Yes, a diploma is just a piece of paper…worth $329,000." That's how much more grads earn per lifetime compared to dropouts. This intervention works great using verbiage, but it also works wells as Poster #9.

 

 

 

 

 

Like These Behavior and Classroom Management Interventions?


The behavior and classroom management interventions shown above are from our books and posters, like the resources shown below. Stop using yesterday's methods with today's kids. You'll find working with difficult students doesn't have to be so difficult.

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