You’ve Never Seen Student Motivational Strategies Like This Before

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

You've Never Seen
Student Motivational Strategies Like This Before

 
 

 

motivational poster 284This issue is filled with brand new motivational strategies that you– our blog subscribers– are seeing before almost everyone else.

Plus, we have new online classes (with credit and hours) to help you solve student motivation problems before they start.

At right, you see Poster 284, another brand new motivational intervention. You can ask your students to create their own "Graduate Magazine" like the one shown here.
 

The Most Amazing Motivational Strategies

for the Most Unmotivated Students

 

It Slices! It Dices! It Graduates!

This intervention can be used in dozens of ways. It's a play on the type of glib, hard-to-forget slogans you hear in infomercials. It's a big hit at our workshops. Our inservice workshops are coming soon, so you can get more strategies like this one at that conference. If you have a bad budget, you can still attend because our blog subscribers can come for just $84, which is half-price. Click here for details.

Here's the motivational strategy– but remember this intervention works really well in lots of different ways– as a sign, poster, card, name tag, door hanger, t-shirt, or even as a note on your board.

Write on the sign, poster, or whatever modality you choose: "Ask me how to earn $329,000." (That is how much more students will earn if they get a high school dipoma.)

 

Motivation: the Movie

View our new, free video tutorials on motivating unmotivated students. (We also have longer online video classes on motivational strategies too.) These videos are packed with ideas to motivate students. These strategies are such big stars that they've got their own movies. This is such a quick, easy way to learn a lot of dynamic student motivational methods in a short time.

Even better, for now, these video tutorials are free. We hope you'll give our new movies great reviews.

 

You Have the Power

Here are some inspiring words to urge your students to finish school. These words could be on a poster on your wall, or they can be used verbally. These words are intended for use with students who are in crisis, using substances, self-destructive, or involved in self-harming behaviors.

Say: "The same power that you have to destroy yourself, you have to save yourself." The words are attributed to Les Paul, the legendary musician, who overcame enormous difficulty to reach his dreams. A good follow-up activity: ask students to read about Les Paul's determination.


It's Your Choice: Twice the Pain or Twice the Gain?

Hopefully you've already been teaching your students that being a high school dropout is like starting a race miles behind everyone else. As we've told you in past issues of this blog, dropouts are the last hired and the first fired. When economics are rough like right now, dropouts suffer disproportionately.

Here is just one example that makes a great motivational strategy. The higher the education level, the lower the unemployment rate. That may happen because grads have more education and skills to fall back on. How disproportionate does it get? Dropouts' unemployment is about twice that of peers who graduate– and just one more of a million reasons to finish school.

 

There's No "Q" in Classroom

This intervention would work best as a poster on your wall. Write "There's no QUIT in this classroom. How can I help you succeed?"

Next, dialogue with students about how you can assist them throughout this school year– even when they feel like quitting because a task is hard, or they are faced with other kinds of problems.

This is a perfect intervention for work refusers. Work refusers tend to be a very hot topic in our live workshops. We spend hours on them. If you can't attend a live inservice course with us, hopefully this intervention will help a bit.

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Work Refusers: Strategies That Work

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Work Refusers:
Remedies That Work

 
 

 

professional development trainer Ruth Herman WellsI bet you know some work refusers. This is professional development trainer Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. and this student is my specialty. I have dozens and dozens of strategies for you.

Our Live Expert Help (click the icon at bottom right on any website page, or call 1.800.545.5736) gets more requests for help with this child than almost any other.

These days, every teacher, every counselor, every social worker, every principal knows students who won't do their work. Some of these work refusers often fail to show up. When they do show up, they often say little, and some may be nearly mute. Some may not even make eye contact, or even look in your direction.

Typically, adults consider two options: pushing the child or backing off. All types of "pushing" can fail, whether rewards, consequences, pressure or logic are used. Backing off can't ever work because if you back off then you're not offering the child an education, or whatever your service is.

The world demands skills from every one of us. No exceptions are made for those who endured abuse or neglect, or have a good reason to seize up. We spend hours thoroughly covering work refusers in our workshop, and can't fit all that comprehensive, step-by-step guidance here, but we'll give you some key tips. Consider coming to our workshop if you want more than just the starters offered here. Learn more about our professional development workshops here. Start reading a few of our best insider tips and tricks for work refusers below.
 


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Classroom Management Problems STOP here


 

Strategies to Help Work Refusers

 

It's Pain, Not a Game

Many work refusers face enormous challenges from severe family problems like violence or verbal abuse, to challenges like disabilities and emotional disorders. Work refusal can appear to be a game, but especially with victimized youngsters, it's not a game at all. Getting "stuck" is the only way they know to survive. It can keep them safe at home, and that survival mechanism comes in with them every day.

Strategy:
Few kids will ever say "I was beaten last night so math seems irrelevant. Can I skip the exam?" For distressed kids who don't wish to disclose the nature of their distress, simply allow them to say whether it's a "good work day" or "bad work day." How much work could you do after a beating? Deeply appreciative of accommodations, most of these traumatized students will work very hard on the days that they're able to.


You're a Life Line

You may be the only sane, sober adult some students know– a fact that you may want to keep in mind.

Strategy:
If you're a teacher, then you may live with on-going "testing mania," and other big pressures to produce results at school. It can be hard to remember that humanity is always more important than scores. Forget the humanity, you won't get good scores. Remember the humanity, you'll maximize your humans and their scores.

 

Tiny Increments

Traumatized kids have so little energy left for school: Surviving the beatings, homelessness, or neglect can demand all the child's resources.

Strategy:
Raise expectations in tiny increments. If a student says your goals are too easy, that's just right. Aim for lots of small successes rather than a big failure followed by seizing up and absences.


Understand: Work Refusal Isn't the Real Problem

Look beyond the work refusal to improve it. Work refusal is almost always a symptom of a bigger problem. It is not the cause. It is not the problem. You can't cure problems by focusing on symptoms, which are merely manifestations of the problem. Symptoms like work refusal are not the cause, they are the result. Focus on just the refusal, you will never get improvement. Focus on the refusal AND the causes, you can get improvement.

Strategy: Ask students why they don't work. When many say "I don't know," reply: "If you did know, what would it be?" This off- beat method can yield important answers. Be ready to arrange help for the serious issues students cite.

 

Listen for What You Don't Hear

Consider this true story as a way to understand your potential impact on vulnerable children who refuse to work: "Mom hasn't moved in three days. I'm worried," the first grader said when asked why he wouldn't work. Tragically, upon investigation, the boy's Mom had passed without any adult knowing. Looking back, would you want to have taken the time to ask, or would you be satisfied that you had only focused on getting the work done? Playwright Harold Pinter, who died recently, once said "The speech we hear is an indication of that which we don't hear." For shut-down, withdrawn work refusers, it is critical that you listen for "that which we don't hear."

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Oh Wow! Student Motivational Methods

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Oh Wow!

 

Student Motivational Methods

 
 

 

K-12 Keynote Speaker Ruth Herman Wells

This is issue is packed with innovative, new student motivational methods that are just so surprisingly different and powerful that you will want to start using them immediately.

I'm Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. and I'm the person that created these motivational methods for elementary, middle and high school students. I truly hope you find them to be effective and easy to use.

You can use the phrases and ideas that make up the motivational techniques as shown on the posters below. Alternatively, you can make your own versions of the posters, have your students do that, or purchase the posters here. Many of these posters are included as free handouts here if you want to go through our long page of free methods and techniques.

 

More Student Motivational Methods That Work
 

Breaking News! All Jobs Now Require a Diploma!

Motivational School PosterThis intervention is so surprising that even your co-workers may react with shock. It is such a potent device that it won't just jar your students– it may grab the attention of anyone who sees it– even adults.

As you can see from the picture at left, the poster proclaims that "All jobs now require a diploma." The small text at the bottom says "Think this poster is scary? Try life without a diploma."

The text at the bottom may be small but it may also be haunting. This intervention works as both a handout or wall poster, plus you could use this device verbally.

 


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Your Diploma: The Real Value Meal

motivational methodMany students are quite vocal about not wanting to work in fast food. They may be equally vocal about not wanting to do anything in school.

Here is a device that may propel students who disdain a career in fast food, to care a bit more about finishing school. This intervention and the next intervention below, will give you two new tools to transform students' dislike of working in fast food into renewed interest in school.

These devices will only work with students who dislike fast food jobs, and should only be used with that portion of your students.

This device can be used as a handout or poster and says: "Which Side of the Counter Do You Prefer? Get a Diploma, the Real-Value Meal."

This item is Poster 131.

 

Finish School and Super-Size Your Life

motivational poster 129Here is a second device for students who disdain a career in fast food.

Like the intervention above, it is meant to parlay students' dislike for fast food jobs into renewed interest in school.

Use this device as a handout or poster. It says: "Don't Want to Spend Your Life Flipping Burgers? Get a Diploma. Super-Size Your Life."

This item is Poster #129 if you prefer to purchase it.

 

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


The 7 Best New School Success Strategies for 2007: Creative Methods to Jump-Start Your Students’ New Year

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

The 7 Best New School Success Strategies for 2007:

  Creative Methods to Jump-Start Your Students' New Year

 
 

 

Here are some brand new interventions for the brand new year. All these devices offer you exciting new methods to build school success this year.

 

School Success Strategies That Work Best

 

Do You Know Where You're Going?

student success activityGive students pictures of a luggage tag. (You can use the one shown if wish. Just click "Save as" then save it. Next, print it from nearly any word processing or graphics program. You can also alter it using those programs if you wish.)

You can cut out the tag to look like an actual luggage tag if you want. Tell students that they are beginning a trip. Tell them that it is a trip through life. Ask students to write down on the luggage tag exactly where they will end up.

Many students will insist that they don't know for sure. You can reply "If you don't know where you're going, then you should be sure to take with you everything you could possibly need. Do you agree?"

Most students will agree that they should take everything from a bikini to a winter coat so they will be ready to function wherever they arrive. Once students acknowledge the need to take everything they might need, let them expand on their assertions, emphatically noting how vulnerable a person might be without that winter coat or without that passport.

Next, write on the board: "Don't Know Where You're Going? Education Will Take You There." (Other options: "Education: Don't Leave Home Without It" and "Education: Will You Have It When You Need It?") Discuss with students if they don't know exactly where they are going, might education be needed when they arrive?

 

Can You Pay the Cost of Living?

It's expensive just to live. Dropouts and people with less education and skills often earn minimum wage, currently $5.15 per hour in many states.

Help your students to do a little math. Based on the current estimated cost of living of $40,000 for an urban family of four, a minimum wage worker must work 150 hours per week–  but there are only 168 hours in a week. That means working all but 2-1/2 hours of every day!

motivation book If instead, two adults in the family both work at minimum wage, each must work 75 hours a week, or about 11 hours per day, way more than a typical eight hour day.

To potently convey the concept to students who think a school day is long, have them imagine going to school from 8 AM to 7 PM seven days a week.

This intervention works best if you help your students discover these facts by doing the math with them. Consider adding in this last fact once you have thoroughly discussed this data.

Note that the numbers are actually worse than indicated because they do not include the tax burden that shaves about one-third off of take-home pay. That fact, offered late in the game, can really get students' attention. Learn more about the book shown above, Maximum-Strength Motivation-Makers. It's available as a book or instant ebook, and has dozens more innovative, motivational strategies like the ones listed here.

 

The Cost of Staying Alive

This intervention is the perfect follow-up to the preceding strategy. Put this statement on the board, then discuss: The average cost of health care is $300 per month, then it gets expensive.

This data is based on a family of four. To adjust this data for smaller families, you can deduct only a small amount– just 10% per person. Ouch. It can be expensive to just stay alive. Be sure your students discover this.


Suggest an Issue Topic

We hope you're liking this issue on school success strategies. We love getting subscriber and workshop participant suggestions like the one that prompted the topic for this issue. Email your ideas for future topics.
 

Like Trying to Tame the Ocean

This intervention is for students who attempt the impossible. For example, a youngster can strive to fix their deeply troubled family, or a student may want to undo his family's recent move to a new state.

This school success intervention is to help students to consider letting go of things that they can not change or improve anyway. To use this device, ask the student if they would ever try to control the ocean. The student will say that no one can control the ocean.

After you receive that response, you can let the student know that their efforts are the equivalent of trying to tame the ocean of its waves. Instead battling the ocean, encourage young people to ride the waves so they end up in a new and better place.


Where to Keep Your Diploma

This school success intervention can be used in an off-the-cuff manner, or you can have students make posters to illustrate it. Be sure to put the completed posters on the wall as on-going motivators.

The idea is based on the fact that grads earn $329,000 more than dropouts per lifetime. Teach your students– "Your diploma: So valuable, it belongs in your wallet."

 


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School Success Starts Here

 

 

No Such Thing Called Regret

There are so many times that youngsters decide to engage in problematic behavior only to then later express regret about their decision. Certainly expressions of regret are important, but you may be troubled when the regret appears to be offered as a way to moderate or avoid the normal consequences.

Here is a wonderful conversation starter from a practicum student at a girls' residential treatment center. I'll let her explain: "I don't believe in the word regret. It allows you to cover up your choices with that one word. I feel like it allows you to not own up to what you did. If I punch someone in the face, they may hit me back, I regret that I got hit back…You can't have your cake and eat it too."

While this school success intervention will only work with students who can process abstract information, it can be the start of an intriguing discussion. You may want to have your group advise you on how regret should be considered in decisions to moderate– or not moderate– consequences. You can relate this discussion to how the "real world" reacts to expressions of regret.

If you decide to incorporate references to some of the recent incidents involving well-publicized celebrity misbehavior, that could draw a broader range of students into the discussion.

 

Have Happy New School Year

This intervention isn't new but it is such a good intervention that we do like to give it out annually. This device is designed for youth who are negative or discouraged about school. (This device can be altered to work in treatment centers and other settings by simply changing the focus from school to your setting.)

Because it is the start of a new year, hold a Happy New School Year party. Don't just have a party; be sure to make new school year resolutions. Have paper ready so the students can write down specific commitments for the new year that they are ready to make.

It is very hard to be negative and sour when you are "toasting" your school success resolutions. To be creative, you can have the students insert the resolutions into balloons, then blow the balloons up and release. (Be sure to be release the balloons indoors or in a way that won't damage the environment.)

You can also have students make small wooden boats out of popsicle sticks or wood scraps, then put the resolutions on the boats. Next, release the boats on a lake or other body of water.

What a lovely way to help students care about success in school.

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Dropout Prevention Strategies for the Real World

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Dropout Prevention Strategies
for the Real World

 
 

 

We're Youth Change Workshops. It's our 18th birthday. Interestingly, 18 is about the age that students should be when they graduate from high school. Sadly, many students dropout well before graduating and turning 18.

Here are birthday-themed interventions that are inspirational and motivational methods to prevent students from dropping out of school before graduating. Hopefully these lively, effective dropout prevention strategies will help more of your students celebrate their 18th birthday with a graduation party and high school diploma.

 

Dropout Prevention Strategies

to Convince Students to Stay in School
 

A Blast From the Future

Ask students to read these headlines from their future birthdays, then discuss if they'll be ready. If you wish, you can use a computer graphics program like Photoshop to alter your local newspaper to actually contain the new date and headline. Include headlines like these:

  • 2011: Mandatory New Test Detects All Substance Use in Job Seekers
  • 2017: Total Automation of Homes Nears: Those With Poor Computer Skills Locked Out
  • 2020: All Jobs Now Require Diploma
  • 2028: Good Bye Cars: Excellent Science Skills Needed for Replacement Vehicles
  • 2033: Job Market Dismal: Near Perfect Attendance Required
  • 2037: Speak Just One Language? Can You Say "No Job"?

 


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Classroom Management Problems STOP here

 

 

Just 'Cuz You Breathe

Have students make posters to illustrate this catch phrase: "Just 'cuz you breathe, doesn't mean you'll receive," then post the posters on the wall and discuss them.

If you preface this activity by giving a few stats on the value of a diploma, this activity can focus on graduation. For example, you can tell students that dropouts often earn too little to pay for a new car, an entire house or apartment, utilities, medical care, and transportation. Or, you can just provide the phrase and let students each choose their own focus.


20 Birthdays Later

Ask each students to write you an email as though it was 20 birthdays later. Ask them to describe their lives 2 decades worth of birthdays from today.

You may be amazed at the profound content you receive as students describe their imagined lives 20 years away. You may wish to save the letters to return to students years later. The long forgotten letters can become a blast from the past that transforms students in the future, but be sure to also use the letters now to discern the hopes and dreams of youngsters who appear to have no hopes and no dreams.

You may want to discuss the emails one-to-one or in groups, and include in the discussion how your site can assist the students to make their hoped-for futures actually happen. You can also save these emails to use whenever a student needs a boost of inspiration.


Can You Read Your Birthday Greetings?

To show students the increasing importance of education in the future, create birthday greetings that might come by email, then ask students to explain the email and say what they would do. To best implement this intervention, create actual emails that you email to students or print out for students to read.

Here are two examples to start you off. Although students may not spot it, both of these sample birthday emails are actually scams that could infect their computers, steal their identities, or otherwise do great harm. If students don't spot the scams, you might mention that education could help.

Happy Birthday. Your friends at electostuff.com have a free birthday gift of the latest game console system for you. It's valued at $239 in stores but free for you. Just click here and input your name, home address, phone number and answer a few more questions, and we will have your free game system to you in no time.

You've received birthday greetings from a friend or family member. Click here to open your personalized birthday card and see what your friend or family member has to say on your special day.

 

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    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.