You’ve Never Seen Student Motivational Strategies Like This Before

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

You've Never Seen
Student Motivational Strategies Like This Before

 
 

 

motivational poster 284This issue is filled with brand new motivational strategies that you– our blog subscribers– are seeing before almost everyone else.

Plus, we have new online classes (with credit and hours) to help you solve student motivation problems before they start.

At right, you see Poster 284, another brand new motivational intervention. You can ask your students to create their own "Graduate Magazine" like the one shown here.
 

The Most Amazing Motivational Strategies

for the Most Unmotivated Students

 

It Slices! It Dices! It Graduates!

This intervention can be used in dozens of ways. It's a play on the type of glib, hard-to-forget slogans you hear in infomercials. It's a big hit at our workshops. Our inservice workshops are coming soon, so you can get more strategies like this one at that conference. If you have a bad budget, you can still attend because our blog subscribers can come for just $84, which is half-price. Click here for details.

Here's the motivational strategy– but remember this intervention works really well in lots of different ways– as a sign, poster, card, name tag, door hanger, t-shirt, or even as a note on your board.

Write on the sign, poster, or whatever modality you choose: "Ask me how to earn $329,000." (That is how much more students will earn if they get a high school dipoma.)

 

Motivation: the Movie

View our new, free video tutorials on motivating unmotivated students. (We also have longer online video classes on motivational strategies too.) These videos are packed with ideas to motivate students. These strategies are such big stars that they've got their own movies. This is such a quick, easy way to learn a lot of dynamic student motivational methods in a short time.

Even better, for now, these video tutorials are free. We hope you'll give our new movies great reviews.

 

You Have the Power

Here are some inspiring words to urge your students to finish school. These words could be on a poster on your wall, or they can be used verbally. These words are intended for use with students who are in crisis, using substances, self-destructive, or involved in self-harming behaviors.

Say: "The same power that you have to destroy yourself, you have to save yourself." The words are attributed to Les Paul, the legendary musician, who overcame enormous difficulty to reach his dreams. A good follow-up activity: ask students to read about Les Paul's determination.


It's Your Choice: Twice the Pain or Twice the Gain?

Hopefully you've already been teaching your students that being a high school dropout is like starting a race miles behind everyone else. As we've told you in past issues of this blog, dropouts are the last hired and the first fired. When economics are rough like right now, dropouts suffer disproportionately.

Here is just one example that makes a great motivational strategy. The higher the education level, the lower the unemployment rate. That may happen because grads have more education and skills to fall back on. How disproportionate does it get? Dropouts' unemployment is about twice that of peers who graduate– and just one more of a million reasons to finish school.

 

There's No "Q" in Classroom

This intervention would work best as a poster on your wall. Write "There's no QUIT in this classroom. How can I help you succeed?"

Next, dialogue with students about how you can assist them throughout this school year– even when they feel like quitting because a task is hard, or they are faced with other kinds of problems.

This is a perfect intervention for work refusers. Work refusers tend to be a very hot topic in our live workshops. We spend hours on them. If you can't attend a live inservice course with us, hopefully this intervention will help a bit.

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
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About Ruth Herman Wells

Author/Trainer Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. is the director of Youth Change Professional Development Workshops. In 2011, Ruth was rated as a Top 10 U.S. K-12 educational and motivational speaker by Speakerwiki and Speakermix. She is the author of several book series, a columnist, adjunct professor for two universities, and a popular keynote speaker and workshop presenter. Ruth's dozens of books includes Temper and Tantrum Tamers and Turn On the Turned-Off Student.