Teacher Professional Development Formats: A Fast Reference Guide

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Teacher Professional Development Formats:

A Fast Reference Guide

 


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Teacher Professional Development Course Formats:

A Fast Reference Guide

 

teacher professional development classesIt can be confusing to sign up for teacher professional development classes today because course formats have evolved into a wide array of choices. You may come to find that you can’t fluently speak the new language of professional development. Here at Youth Change Professional Development Workshops, we get lots of questions like “How does an online class work?” and “What’s the difference between a streaming and recorded class?” In this high tech era, professional course delivery options are many, and it can be hard to keep up.

In this quick reference guide, I will run through the most common questions we get and do my best to help you nail down all the terminology so you can make informed professional development course selections. Hi from Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. That’s me in the image at right, as shown in our video Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Online Class. I’m a course presenter, keynote speaker and the Director of Youth Change Professional Development Workshops. I hope our quick manual will be a good guide to staying current with all the terminology that you need to know to take full advantage of today’s ever-changing teacher professional development choices.

 

Professional Development Class Terminology

teacher class management

 

In-Person Professional Development Classes

Think of these courses as analog or legacy professional development classes. This is the old school or old style, conventional method of training. You show up at selected site and hear and see the speaker live. You know this format. Examples of live courses include our professional development classes (click) coming soon to Portland and Seattle. Live courses are interactive and you can usually ask questions and exert some control over the content. On the negative side, you have to get to the event site regardless of weather, traffic or competing demands.

teacher class management

 

Online Professional Development Classes

This term obviously applies to professional development classes delivered via the internet, but the term can include an assortment of formats, all delivered online. When someone uses the term “online class,” they usually mean that the course is a pre-recorded video. Usually, the video will play just like any video you find on the internet, and you can fast forward, stop, rewind and save the video to watch at a later date. But, there are other kinds of online professional development classes. You can see PDFs, audiobooks and ebooks used as online classes. Instead of watching a video, you read an ebook or PDF, or you might listen to an audiobook. “Online class” can also be used to describe another format that varies a bit from video, the Powerpoint presentation. Usually, the Powerpoint presentation is automated and plays like a video. It may even be a video but instead of viewing a class or lecture as you might during a video, you see only or mostly slides that advance on their own. Typically this format does permit you to stop, fast forward, rewind and stop the class, and return to it later.

Not everyone learns well from online professional development. You have to have discipline or motivation to sit hours watching a screen. Most online professional development classes will play on most any internet-connected device but it can be trying to watch a 10 hour course on your little cell phone. These courses are all pre-recorded so you can’t ask questions or control the content of the class at all. There may or may not be a mechanism to reach out to the instructor. On the plus side, you can take classes while you jog on a treadmill or eat breakfast. See examples of our online professional development classes. Online courses are often cheaper than in-person professional development classes but not always. Online courses may or may not hold your interest. It is a lot easier for a presenter to hold your attention when she is live, standing right in front of you versus when she is a not even a half inch tall on your little iPhone.

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Streaming Professional Development Classes

This term seems to confuse people the most. Streaming means that the professional development class is happening live in real time but that it is being delivered online. Typically, you are asked to attend by going to an online meeting website link, often a site like GotoMeeting.com. You may listen and see the professional development course by yourself perhaps using your desktop computer monitor or your phone. Another variation: You might watch on a large monitor as part of a group or staff watching together. Sometimes, you can interact with the presenter, sometimes by phone or by using a microphone. Sometimes you can only interact through a human monitor who relays questions to the instructor, or you might type your questions into your device and that is relayed to the teacher. People can participate from any geographic location all at the same time, or the professional development class can be restricted to members of a school or agency.

Streaming is great because you don’t usually have to go anywhere to attend. The cost can be less than a comparable in-person class, or the class can even be offered free. On the negative side, it can get dull pretty fast. You may find it hard to stay engaged especially if the course is many hours long. It is tough for instructors to project their personalities or a sense of excitement through a screen. If you are sitting at work, you are vulnerable to distractions and interruptions. The course may stream at a time that is not convenient to you. Interacting with the instructor may be slow or difficult. There is always the possibility of technological problems like poor quality video, poor quality sound, lost connections and so on. You can not necessarily save the streamed class, rewind, stop or pause it. You may not be able to return to it. Instructors can generally provide a recorded copy of the completed streaming class, but that is not always done. One real limitation is that you are either watching at the designated time or you miss the course. Learn about our streaming professional development classes.

teacher class management

 

Recorded Streaming Professional Development Classes

As you read above, once the streaming professional development class is over, it is often provided to you as a recorded course. Typically, this means that the once live online course now is a recorded online course. This progression can confuse people. Here is how you can understand it: When you are filming live with your cell phone, that is similar to the class streaming live on the internet. After you finish filming live with your cell phone, you may play back what you just recorded. The recorded streaming professional development class is simply the playback of the live streaming course. Because recorded online streaming classes are fixed, you have all the drawbacks of any online course. Once the streaming stops being live, you may or may not be able to reach the instructor, ask questions or make comments.

teacher class management

 

Other Professional Development Terms to Know

 

Here are a few more terms to be sure you remember:

Self-paced: This just means you can take the class at your own pace. Online classes and recorded streaming courses allow for this if you can stop, pause, and rewind at will. 

eLearning: This umbrella term just means that the course is delivered electronically. That could mean the professional development course is provided online, on a CD or some other electronic method.

Hybrid or Blended Learning: This is a course that uses both electronic and in-person formats, or some other combination of virtual formats. For example, a learner might take an online course then email back and forth with the instructor, or meet with the teacher in person.

Synchronous Learning: This term means that all of the students are taking the professional development class at the same time.

Asynchronous Learning: This term means that not all the students are taking the class at the same time. So, this type of learning results in a single learner interacting directly with the content via a technology system. The learner can go as fast or slow as desired instead of progressing in unison with others or as a part of a group.

Distance Learning: This is another umbrella term that encompasses almost any professional development format that is not sitting in a classroom in person on a set schedule. Online classes and streaming are both types of distance learning, for example.

 

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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
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How to Work with Students Who Use Violence to Refuse to Work in Class

 

violent students

 

Just Say "No," Don't Throw!

How to Work with Students
Who Use Violence
to Refuse to Work in Class

 

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students who refuse workIn this issue, we focus on a question posed by a subscriber to the Behaviors and Classroom Management Blog. You can contact us with your question and you just might see it featured in a future issues. You can email me, Ruth Herman Wells, Director of Youth Change Professional Development Workshops or click Live Help on the bottom of any page on our website

Suzanne is a teacher who emailed me for help teaching her students who are work refusers, but unlike most students who try to do nothing in class, some of Suzanne's students are becoming violent about it. If you are used to students who are more passive about not wanting to work in school, you may find it a whole different ball game when working with students who act out while making their refusal known.

Here is what Suzanne wrote:

"At our school we have been having difficulty dealing with children who when faced with work will throw things, or act out in very dramatic ways. How do you go about helping the child while protecting the education of your other students?"

 

Students Who Refuse to Work

2 Types, 2 Sets of Strategies
 

At the risk of a bit of over-simplification, there are probably at least two major reasons why student will act-out dramatically when faced with work. You can't necessarily use the same interventions with different types of work refusers. Well, you can use the same interventions but they won't work equally well with different kinds of students. Just as you can't use a single math text book or reading technique with every student, you can't rely on a single style of intervention, consequence or talk to work with the variety of students who refuse assignments.
 

student won't work in classStudent #1
 

Here is the first type of student who refuses to work in class. If you've been a longtime subscriber to The Behavior and Classroom Management Blog, you should find yourself on familiar turf and ready to move forward. This youngster is a student who we've covered many times before in many articles in this blog, so we'll just touch on this student this time, then move on to the second reason. If you want to review some of the previous articles on work refusal, check out our huge assortment of free educational professional development articles on the topic in our Educational Articles Index.

One reason that students may engage in extreme behaviors when faced with a task, is that the student has a mental health problem called Conduct Disorder. If you have been a subscriber to the articles  in this blog, hopefully, you remember what you learned in past issues when we covered this topic.

The key points that we hope stuck with you from reading those articles are these: Children with conduct disorders (C.D.) lack a conscience so they do what they want, when they want, to who they want. C.D.s are your most misbehaved kids so there is a chance that if someone is routinely  throwing items and is utterly unremorseful, that child could be conduct disordered. A child with C.D. can engage in serious misconduct at any time, but certainly, when faced with a distasteful task, that task can easily prompt bad behavior.

violent studentsAs you may remember, you must use a completely different set of techniques with C.D.s so the way you prevent and manage misbehavior with this portion of your students is very different from how you accomplish that goal with the rest of your group. So, Suzanne, for the possible C.D.s in your classroom, use the techniques we've offered you in previous issues. Can't locate those issues? Here again are our introductory training guides on Conduct Disorder. Want more details than offered in the two introductory articles? You can purchase our Conduct Disorders and Anti-Social Youth book, ebook, audio book or online training course to get all the information you need for this portion of your students.

As you may recall from the past issues, C.D.s are usually at least 11-14% of a typical mainstream classroom, so you can expect to always have at least a few to manage in every setting. So, it's well worth your time to have top-notch skills with this very difficult-to-manage population of students.

 

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students refuse workStudent #2
 

The second major explanation why a student will chronically and violently refuse work is that the youngster is overwhelmed, frustrated, tired, upset, or hoping to avoid the chore. This youngster is like a pressure cooker who can explode. Years ago, families more thoroughly and reliably taught their offspring how to behave and manage frustration, and students' conduct reflected that.

With this group of misbehaved youngsters, you will have to teach them the self-management techniques that they did not master at home. You will also need to equip them with the motivation and attitudes that would foster better conduct. Our Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop and books have hundreds of strategies on self-control, accepting assignments, and anger management. We have included a few of our favorites below:
 

Your Mama 101


If you don't have a class with the title of "Your Mama 101," then maybe now is the time to start one. This class can teach youngsters all the skills they need to manage their anger and aggression.

What are some of your youngsters learning about anger control at home and in the community? At home, anger may be screamed away, or drugged away, or dishes may be thrown. None of those behaviors are acceptable at your site, yet that is all the anger management that some children know. Until you teach your students to manage their anger, many will continue to be unable to behave in a socially acceptable manner.

Even though teaching anger control perhaps should not have to be your job, you may want to make it your job. Until you do teach those skills, you may find that there are no consequences, no rules– no anything– that will work as a substitute. You wouldn't expect math skills until you taught those skills. Similarly, you can't shouldn't expect anger control skills until you teach those skills. While, in theory, you can expect or want any behaviors you wish, until you teach students how to perform those behaviors, you probably won't see those behaviors.

Here's an example of a ready-to-use intervention that helps younger students who often lack patience and act out aggressively when frustrated. Use this silly mnemonic device to gently help students use more socially acceptable ways to attempt to decline a task: "Just say 'no,' don't throw."
 

Find Work With a Temper Like That


This strategy remains a favorite at our live workshops, so we will include it here. Ask your students to name all the jobs that they can do and throw things (or lose control) whenever they want. There are none. When your students figure that out, ask them if they will ever need to work.
 

Pro-Active Skill Training


Don't wait for the book to sail through the air. Pro-actively teach all your students the self-control skills they need. For Suzanne's situation, she could teach students what to say when they don't want to do a task, they don't know how to do it, or they need help.

You may assume that most children are able to say "I don't want to do it," which is a much better way of communicating than throwing a book. Be careful about that assumption. Children are not little adults. They may not know how to properly say that they'd prefer to forgo the chore. Give them the sentences they need so they can properly communicate with you.

Be very sure to address all three of the circumstances mentioned above. We recommend that the sentence begins with "yes." For example, you could give your students sentences such as "Yes, I know you want me to read that story aloud but I don't want to do it."

We recommend the "yes" as adults often appreciate that initial gesture of willingness, and including that word may make that sentence work successfully with a wide variety of teachers, coaches, parents, etc. rather than just with you.

Many teachers post their recommended three sentences on the wall of the classroom. A sample sentence: "Yes, I will do it but I really don't want to." Be sure to cover all the skills needed to manage work in your setting, not just the three circumstances noted here. So, for example, be sure to cover managing boredom during tasks; what to do when you are upset; managing frustration during a task; what to do when you hate a task; and so on. Remember: Any area that you do not cover, will remain a problem.

 

Talk About Work Refusal


Chances are that you have never even discussed with your students how often they should decline work. That means that your students are expected to adhere to a standard that you have never quantified for them. Assist students to identify how often work refusal is permitted each day in the work world, then help them establish a standard that is fairly similar. Now, your students have a quantifiable standard, and appreciate the logic behind it.
 

studentPain Delay


When you give an assignment to a youngster, no child will ever reply: "I watched Dad beat my Mom last night. Science just doesn't seem very relevant right now. Can I postpone this task?" Few youngsters will neatly identify their pain and request an accommodation so you have to provide them a way to gain relief on days that they are particularly troubled. Without a socially appropriate way to gain relief, some troubled students will act out.

Here are some methods that can eliminate the need to act out. For older kids who you suspect may face serious problems, allow them to identify "good work days" and "bad work days."

For younger children, you can make a mock- up of a traffic light, and have red be a "bad work day," yellow would be an "okay work day," and green is a "good work day."

If you worry that distressed students may take advantage of your accommodations, don't worry. You'll become their life line, and they won't jeopardize that connection. They will work as hard as they can on days they are able. Isn't that really all you should ask of a child who lives in pain?

 

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    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


 

Our 100th Classroom Management Blog: Best Educational Articles and Strategies

 

class management blog

 

Our 100th Classroom Management Blog:
Best Educational Articles
and Strategies

 
 

 

classroom management help

Get ready to celebrate our 100th issue of the Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog.

This blog first began in 1999 as an online magazine and has been published nearly once a month ever since. We have over 15,000 teachers, counselors, principals, juvenile justice workers, special educators, instructors and youth professionals throughout North America as subscribers.

For all 100 issues, I've been your source. My name is Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I provide behavior and classroom management consultation, workshops and help throughout North America. I'm the author of dozens of books on how to manage student behavior problems.

As we looked back on 7 years and all 100 issues of this magazine, we thought we'd bring you the top intervention from each year. Our selections are based on the comments we receive from participants at our live workshops. Chances are you haven't read every word of each of the 100 issues, or been a subscriber for the full 7 years, so here are some of our most adored and talked-about interventions that you just may have missed.
 

The Best Strategies From Articles
in the First 100
Behavior and Classroom Management
Problem-Solver Blog Issues

 

Top Intervention from 1999
If Life Were This Easy

Classroom Management Poster 2Use this intervention with students who think your services are a waste of time.

To use this intervention, read or show one sentence of the following text, one sentence at a time. Allow students to laugh and snicker at each sentence before revealing the next phrase.

This intervention works really well, and is fun. Enjoy! (You can purchase this intervention as our Poster #2.)

Here's your new, high-paying job– and you can never be fired from it!
Here's your new, beautiful spouse, who is always cheerful, never sick, and has tons of money!
Hope you like your new home. It's your dream house and it's paid for, and will never need repairs!
Here's all the possessions you've ever wanted, and, of course, they are already paid for!

If life were this easy, you wouldn't need us!

 

Top Intervention from 2000
Mamas, Don't Let Your Daughters Grow Up to be Dropouts

Here are "5 Frightening Facts for Females" that every potential female dropout needs to know:

1) No one earns less than a female drop-out
2) She earns considerably less
3) Her salary will likely drop by about 1/2% annually
4) Teen moms are the most likely to drop out of school, go on welfare, and live in poverty
5) Teen moms are the most likely to never get out of poverty

 

Top Intervention from 2001
It's Okay to Be Mad

This simple intervention remains very popular. Simply teach students "It's okay to be mad. It's not okay to be mean."

 

Top Intervention from 2002
But I Hate Everything

This popular intervention was created by a foster parent who regularly heard from her foster children that they hated being placed in foster care, hated their new school, and so on. Her reply: "Bloom where you're planted."

Article Continues Below

 

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Schedule Your On-Site Inservice Workshop Now

It's More Affordable Than You Think

Learn 100s of Strategies for Work Refusers, Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated and Withdrawn Students

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One Click Can Solve It All

 

 

Article Continues Here

 printable classroom management postersTop Intervention from 2003
Are You Ready for High Tech Planet?

People sure love our multiple choice quizzes. Here's an excerpt from one of our most enduring quizzes, Can You Speak the Language on High Tech Planet?

Soon, everyone may need a home computer to perform essential everyday activities. Luckily, I already have an ISP. It's

a) The I Sense Psychics Channel
b) An Icy Spinach Parfait
c) An Internet Service Provider, which is necessary to connect to the internet

Poster #284, shown above, offers you an additional classroom management and motivational strategy. Open it to view it in more detail.

 

Top Intervention from 2004
The Sounds of Silence

Here is a terrific device to quiet your group quickly. This intervention is a lot of fun. Using a TV remote control, teach students to become "mute" when you push the button on the remote. Students really like this intervention, and will often become mute mid-word, just like a TV would. If you wish, this technique can be used throughout class, and at other times. You can even let students help you manage your class by having a youngster operate the remote control, and of course, the students love that.

 

Top Intervention from 2005
What a Nerd

Here is another simple intervention that our workshop participants always comment on. This intervention is meant to be told as a joke. "What do you call a nerd in five years?" Answer: "Boss."

 

New Intervention from 2006
Now, More Than Ever: Sports Stars Need School

We have a new trend in sports, announced in today's newspapers. A new, national, pro football league that will begin play in 2007, will only accept players who have completed their college degree– yes, that was college degree. Let's hope that other sports will take note and soon follow.

 

Like These Behavior and Classroom Management Interventions from Our Blog?
Many of these popular interventions are from our books and posters, like the resources shown below. Call 1-800-545-5736 or click Live Help if you have questions.

Isn't it time to stop using yesterday's methods with today's kids?

 

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    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.