How to Improve Students’ Bad Attitudes: Strategies That Work Better & Faster

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

How to Improve Students' Bad Attitudes:

Strategies That Work Better & Faster

 
 

 

 

How to Improve Students' Bad Attitudes:

Strategies That Work Better & Faster

student bad attitude

It's winter. It's that time of year that if the weather doesn't get to you, your students do. One huge annoyance can be the lousy attitudes that you are facing starting too early every morning to way too late each afternoon. You may even have a student or two who is so difficult and sour that you can't forget about him on that long drive home. We're ready to help. Hello from Youth Change Professional Development Workshops' Director, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I've spent my entire career developing and honing unorthodox, highly effective strategies to turn around even the most negative student you work with.

The most important thing to realize is that no one changes their attitude because someone else thinks that would be a good idea. If you directly ask students to change their attitude, that's fine, but it probably hasn't been working very well. The strategies below avoid the failure rate that mere words can produce when it comes to trying to generate student attitude adjustments. Notice that all of these student attitude adjustment strategies do not rely primarily on words, but take more indirect approaches. The use of this style of approach means that you are placing a light bulb over the students' head but letting the student pull the cord to turn it on. If you pull the cord for the student, then really the only option left for many of them is to fight back and resist. Using less direct methods means that most of the time, the student with the negative attitude, won't always immediately default to being resistant or oppositional.

The next time you consider just telling a student to improve their attitude, remember that the adult equivalent is being told to lose weight or stop drinking. That image may be a very useful reminder to minimize your reliance on verbiage and to increase your use of more indirect approaches that don't generate resistance.

teacher workshopIf you want more than the sampling of strategies offered here, consider coming to our Seattle Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop on May 4-5, 2017. Right now, we have have two completely free work-study scholarships to give away. Grab one of these awesome no-fee workshop registration slots before they are all taken. Call 1.800.545.5736 to quickly sign up. You'll learn 200 powerhouse strategies for whatever student behavior, attitude and social problems you name.

 

Students' Negative Attitude-Buster Strategies
 

student bad attitude posterUse Passive Intervention Strategies

to Improve Students' Bad Attitudes

Poster #314, shown at right, is the perfect, low effort strategy to chip away at students' bad attitudes. It may appear that the student is just staring at the wall but Poster #314 could be eating away at them slowly day by day. You don't need to buy the poster. You can make your own, or have a student whose behavior warrants a consequence, make a version of the image shown here. Either way, students can't argue with a poster. Nor, can students unsee what they read. Your message was delivered– and probably more rapidly than if verbiage had been the sole method. With this passive intervention strategy, you've planted a seed that may gradually begin to grow over time. This tactic is most definitely not a quick cure, but part of an on-going effort that can ultimately produce results.

 

Use Strategies That Show the Benefits

of Attitude Improvement

If people are going to change, it's because they see a reason to change. Give your students a reason to improve their bad attitudes. Show students what's in it for them if they limit or improve their negative attitude. This approach can work very well with your more self-interested students who care mostly about what they can get for themselves. When the student is in a difficult situation, such as having done a minor bit of problem behavior, encourage the youngster to "Keep 1 Problem to 1, Not Turn 1 Problem Into 2." Since this strategy shows students what they get for themselves by evidencing a less negative attitude, this approach can be hard to resist. It is, in essence, showing students that their negative attitude is like the old adage about biting your tongue to spite your face. The more you can link a more positive attitude to the student getting more of what they say they want, the more progress you may make improving the negativity. It's almost like you are marketing and selling a more positive attitude like it was a brand of jeans or cell phone.

 

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student attitude posterUse Strategies That Un-Normalize

Students' Bad Attitudes

At many schools, having a sulky, negative, oppositional attitude is considered normal. Consider working to get that rather bad standard to be different. Poster #574 (shown at right) gives you some words to do that. It can start or further the process of helping your students understand that being nasty or mean or difficult is not a life plan that will work. You can also help students to identify all the jobs and businesses that people can succeed in if you are really unkind to those around you. Most students realize that there are few or no jobs where abusive behavior is tolerated, and that ultimately having a really negative attitude will be a potential obstacle and impediment throughout life. You are again selling the idea of a more positive attitude as benefiting the student with the negative attitude. Us humans are often pretty self-interested and that makes this strategy a good candidate to use if you want to transform the bad attitudes you see in your classroom or around your school or program. Using the phrase shown on the poster, "healthy humans don't destroy other humans" is a great phrase to use regularly as it can impact some students who will find the words unsettling.

 

Use Inspirational Strategies

to Improve Students' Bad Attitudes

Some students are impacted by pretty sayings and inspirational words. For your students who have negative attitudes, but might respond to inspiring words of wisdom, consider using this phrase, or creating a poster of the words for your walls. The phrase is "Live each moment as if you chose it." These words are going to be especially useful for students who are sullen and negative in specific settings, such as P.E. class or when there is an exam announced. Because the phrase is provocative and worth further thought, some students may actually stop and consider what it means since it's meaning is not necessarily obvious. It is difficult to resist words that you haven't yet figured out, making this strategy a winner. In the instant that the student grasps the phrase's meaning, you actually delivered a bit of insight to the youngster. It can be one step on the long progression of improving that student's attitude in your classroom and school.

 

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
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Expert Help with Student Acting-Out, Behavior and Classroom Management

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

More Behavior and Classroom Management

Q & A

From

The Breakthrough Strategies

 

Professional Development Workshop

 
 

 

Our Behavior and Classroom Management Blog issues that answer your questions are always so popular. We  have listened to the many subscribers who wrote in, and will answer more of your questions again in this issue. Just like the participants in our live Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop, it is clear that subscribers like to set the topics, and get immediate solutions for their most challenging "kid problems."

As always, children and teens acting-out is a hot topic, but this blog issue also takes a look at child and adolescent self-harm, which can be thought of as acting-in.

classroom management expertThe questions featured in this issue come from our recent Breakthrough Strategies Workshops' participants. If you would like to attend one of our upcoming behavior and classroom management conferences, our professional development schedule is here.

I'm Youth Change Workshops Director and Professional Development Instructor Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. and I'm here to answer your questions so email us any queries you have.

 

classroom management trainingMore of Our Best Answers to Your Questions
 

About Troubled and Problem Youth & Children

 

Q: Maryann is a school counselor in Pemberton, NJ. She requested "strategies to use for children who seek attention by acting out."

A: Maryann, we did a whole issue on this subject several months ago, perhaps before you were a subscriber, so it's too soon to devote a whole issue to this topic, but let me give you a couple favorites.

► There is an old saying: "children would rather be praised than punished, but they'd rather be punished than ignored." With that in mind, wait for the acting-out student to be properly behaved, and then offer attention. Although misbehavior compels the adults to give attention, it starts a cycle of misbehavior netting attention, so by acting out, a student can extract notice. That's the exact opposite of what you want to occur so catch your students "doing good" and offer attention then. You are eliminating the need to act out to be noticed. There are even stickers you can buy for younger students that say "Caught doing good."

► Class clowns are the classic example of students who chronically act out. Be sure that teachers have their class establish a recommended number of times to talk out, then expect students to follow that standard. Without a quantifiable standard, you are expecting students to adhere to a standard that is unspecified. That isn't fair or reasonable. For class clowns, work with them to learn about the proper frequency of comments, the correct type of content, and appropriate duration. If you can channel the input to be appropriate, you will give that student lifelong skills to be beloved in the work place for making light, well-timed, often much-needed, humorous comments. You have transformed acting out into a potential, major work place asset. Everyone loves the co-worker who can break up the staff meeting with a well- timed, wry comment or socially acceptable joke.

expert classroom management

Q: Theresa, who teaches kindergarten, wants more of a focus on younger children. She writes: "I'm not a new teacher (15 years) but, the behaviors I have seen and dealt with the past two to three years are becoming much more common. Out of a class of 16, 8 of them have really horrible behaviors. One even killed a cat this year! Thanks so much…I would love to come to a workshop if you are ever in Wichita, KS."

A: If you let us know that Kansas schools and children's agencies aren't facing desperate budgets, we may look at hosting a session in your state. We try to host classes in regions where youth professionals have an adequate professional development budget. Right now, the closest we'll get is Texas or Indiana, which isn't exactly close. You can always ask your school district, professional association, teachers' conference, or local Education Service Center to sponsor a class. It's been a while since one of the Kansas Ed Service Centers hosted us. Or consider the course online. Now, if you had taken our Breakthrough Strategies class, or if you have been very carefully reading this blog, then you would know the answer to this question. Theresa and everybody else: before reading further, stop and consider if you already know the answer to this query, because we have touched on the answer a lot in previous issues of this magazine– and we devote hours to the subject in class.

The most misbehaved children may be "conduct disorders." From past issues or class, you may remember that those words refer to a specific mental health category that describes the most out of control students. While only a counselor can diagnose, anyone can be concerned that a child falls into this category. Theresa, here is the critical element: you must work completely differently with these students. If you use conventional methods, you will find "nothing works."

For Theresa and others of you with very young students, here's more bad news: the younger the severe misbehavior begins, the worst the outlook. The good news: if more professionals could identify and correctly work with young conduct disorders, the better the chance of aiding that child to avoid that otherwise grim prognosis for the future. Sadly, without targeted intervention, conduct disorders are at high risk of violating the law, and ending up imprisoned. Properly working with that 5 year old conduct disorder today can have incredible impact on his future. That is why Theresa's question is so important.

Anytime you have a young (or older) child doing the most extreme behaviors such as animal abuse, that should be a "red flag" to alert you to consider using the specialized methods that work with conduct disorders. The second and third issues of this magazine offered you an glimpse into this large population, and Theresa, you use exactly the same type of methods with both older and younger students. You can read a lot more information from other Behavior and Classroom Management Blog issues in our detailed Blog Index. You can also just look in the brief Blog Index (at right) for articles listed under "Conduct Disorders." However, a few articles will not substitute for fully upgrading your skills with this growing population.

Anytime you have a young (or older) child doing the most extreme behaviors such as animal abuse, that should be a "red flag" to alert you to consider using the specialized methods that work with conduct disorders. The second and third issues of this magazine offered you an glimpse into this large population, and Theresa, you use exactly the same type of methods with both older and younger students.
classroom management help

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classroom management resources

 

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Q: Here is the email we got from Angela: "My topic suggestion is one that I do not think is addressed enough anywhere– self-mutilation. It is a far more common problem than once thought."

A: Angela, you didn't tell us your job, or where you were from, but wherever you are and whatever your job, you are correct. If you are a counselor, you may have noted the increase in the amount of disturbed youngsters, especially in the early grades. The answer we give to your query is going to depend on your job. We are going to play the odds and guess that you are a teacher since we have more teachers as subscribers than counselors. Let's hope we guess right.

If you are not a mental health professional, then whenever you have specific data to suggest active self-harm, you need to immediately notify your administrator or counselor. Only counselors and other mental health workers should be managing behaviors that could be– or become– life threatening. I am not saying that superficial cutting of the wrist automatically indicates a potential suicide attempt, but ensuring the child's safety must be the job of the mental health worker, and there are no exceptions to that– even if your budget-crunched school lacks a counselor. You will need their guidance, and there is no work-around that is worth risking a child's life.

Even though non-mental health workers must consult a counselor, you still need to understand what makes these children tick, and adapt how you work with them. Plus, other behaviors may really be, or border on self- harm. For example, extreme tattooing or piercings, reckless driving, and serious promiscuity are just a few examples. To understand these youngsters, remember that distressed children don't manage their distress in "appropriate" ways. They don't enter class and say "I feel neglected so I would like additional interaction and nurturance today." They manage their distress in primitive, inappropriate ways like self-mutilation.

For non-counselors, you want to adjust how you work with the child by striking the balance between your mission and the child's distress. That means that when the child is distressed, you may lower the expectations. On days the child is more functional, you increase expectations. You also observe for safety concerns and let your mental health worker guide you on all else. Even if you lack an on- site counselor, it is not wise to learn counseling by practicing on a distressed youngster. Instead of counseling these students, be nurturing, involved, alert, and available. Offer them time, and listen to what they say– and don't say. Ask them what they need.

Sometimes, these youngsters just want someone to notice. But leave the counseling to those trained to do it. Even if you have to move heaven and earth to arrange it, your energy is best spent ensuring that each hurting child has access to a capable counselor who knows exactly how to help.

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    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Fast Methods to Stop Classroom Management Problems

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

5 Fast Strategies to Stop
Classroom Management Problems
Before They Start

 
 

We have been getting the same classroom management questions over and over again at the Live Expert Help area of our web site (http://www.youthchg.com). Many of you have been asking how to get young people to behave in class and group settings. Many of the counselors have passed along requests from teachers who want to know how to stop the non-stop discipline problems that disrupt the learning process.

K-12 Keynote Speaker Ruth Herman WellsI'm the director of Youth Change Workshops, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I've spent my whole career amassing the best classroom management methods that exist. I'm going to share five of my favorites here, along with a couple bonus methods.

Kids are not born instinctively knowing how to talk one at a time, keep their hands to themselves and stay quiet when others are talking. In fact, most– if not all– of the behaviors that adults want to see in their class or group setting, must be taught. Years ago, a teacher, for example, could count on most families to train their offspring to talk one at a time, keep their hands to themselves, etc. Now, many of you may find that many of your students appear to have little preparation from home on how to behave appropriately in the classroom. That's part of why classroom management has been getting harder and harder.

Although perhaps it should be the parents' job to train their offspring to have basic behavior management and self-control skills, it's quite clear that many families cannot or will not provide this essential training. So, to get the discipline and order you want in your classroom, school or site, you will have to provide that training.

You must be thorough, covering everything from attendance and punctuality to when to talk and what to wear to school. Plus, remember that stating expectations is never enough. You must drill skills into habits, and don't forget to defuse the apathy and adjust negative attitudes so students are sufficiently motivated and disposed to perform the behaviors that you want. You must cover all three areas: skills, motivation and attitude. We call this essential preparation to be a student School Skills Training.

Below you will find a handful of School Skills Training strategies from our thousands of behavior and classroom management methods that train youngsters to behave appropriately and develop motivation and a positive attitude. If you want more than this sampling of methods, sign up for an upcoming live workshop. Scholarships are available. You can also take our courses online or click over to our website, http://www.youthchg.com, to see thousands more behavior and classroom management methods to prevent or manage student misconduct and apathy.

Article continues below…

 

 

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Schedule Your On-Site Inservice Workshop Now

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Learn 100s of Strategies for Work Refusers, Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated and Withdrawn Students

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Article continues here…

5 Fast Strategies to Stop
Classroom Management Problems
Before They Start

 

1. Finish What You Started

classroom management methodsGetting students to finish their work can be a year-long battle. Win the war on task completion by helping students see the value in finishing their work. Our Poster #323 provides a quick way to give you a motivational technique to help students understand why it is critical that they finish class assignments. You don't need to buy the poster, you can simply say the phrase pictured, although the poster offers a constant reminder instead of a transitory one. Of course, it takes more than one intervention to motivate students, but you can find hundreds of additional methods on our site.

BONUS METHOD: Motivating students to care about finishing their work is a necessary first step but you will also have to teach task completion skills. Be sure to teach: How to hear assignments, how to remember assignments, when to start assignments, how to remember to bring homework back to school, and so on. There are actually a lot of skills that must be taught if you want students to be able to complete their work once they have become more motivated to do so.

 

2. Take Out Talk-Outs

Your students may feel that they can talk out at will, and say whatever they want whenever they want, even though you have set a different standard for your classroom. To convincingly teach children and youth that talk-outs are a problem, reverse roles. Have a young person assume the job of teacher, for example, and then have that youth attempt to complete an easy task such as teaching the class to remember a five digit number– but the task will be tough to accomplish amidst many talk-outs. Offer the role play teacher a big prize for successfully completing the task, but coach the other students to talk out at will. The role-play teacher will be unable to successfully complete the task. Ask the class to suggest a rule regarding the amount of talk-outs.

BONUS METHOD: Students do not magically know how many times to talk out in your class or group. Plus, many of them lack the skills to discern it on their own– so be sure to have every group or class set a standard. It is unfair to expect youngsters to adhere to a standard that is unquantified.

 

3. How Do You Get Help Around Here?

Students don't start the school year magically knowing how to ask for help. This frequent event can become an on-going classroom nightmare when students don't know how to appropriately perform this basic classroom skill. Some students may believe that it's okay to act out when they're frustrated or want help. Turn that around with this fun intervention. Ask the students to devise "The Top 10 Ways the Teacher Can't Tell You Need Help." Elicit answers like: you glare, you mutter, and you run out of the room.

 

4. Who is Supposed to Be in Charge?

Some young people act like they are in charge. To provide clarification, ask the group to name all the qualifications that teachers, counselors, coaches– or whatever your job is– are supposed to have. List their responses on the board, eliciting answers like "a college degree" and "a teaching license." After the list is complete, have the group determine who has those qualifications, the adult or a student.

 

5. Pay Attention to This

Most teachers expect students to pay attention–classroom management strategies without ever teaching exactly how to do that, or why students should even comply with that expectation. Start by motivating students to see the importance of establishing and maintaining focus. To do so, have your students list all the jobs and businesses that they may wish to do. Write their responses in a column on the board. Ask your group to determine the potential consequences of inattention in those occupations. Write those answers in a second column. Encourage the group to craft amusing and dramatic answers that will convince students of the importance of staying focused. For example, have your students identify exactly what is likely to happen if a surgeon or truck driver is inattentive.

BONUS METHOD: To teach your students that being in the bathroom instead of the classroom has consequences, view the image shown at right. You can use the text shown on Poster #226 as verbiage. To view the poster enlarged, click on the image.

 

Get hundreds more classroom management methods
in our live Breakthrough Strategies Workshops
coming soon to Portland, Los Angeles and Seattle

Scholarships: 1.800.545.5736

 

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    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Free School Posters

 

behavior classroom management blog

 

Free School Posters

 

for Teachers, Counselors and Principals

 

 

arrowdrawn5

arrowWorkshop Scholarships

 

for Portland 


If you have a bad budget, we have scholarship slots for our Portland, Oregon Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop on October 10-11, 2013. Call us at 1.800.545.5736 to sign up to attend this behavior and classroom management workshop as a scholarship work-study helper.

 

In This Issue:

free school posterTo celebrate our all-new posters, for a limited time, we're giving away free posters to elementary, middle school and high school teachers, counselors and principals.

Grab the posters now and you'll have fresh, new wall decorations for your classroom or office when you return to school this fall. Gear up for back-to-school now and avoid that last minute rush to get the classroom decorations you need.

You can see one of the free posters pictured at right. It's the perfect motivation-maker for your classroom or office.

We think we have some of the best school posters that exist, and they're even better when they are offered as free printable versions, and that's exactly what we have for you if you're a K-12 educator.

To get the free printable school posters featured in this Behavior and Classroom Management Blog issue, you have to take two quick steps by June 18, 2013:

  1. Tell a co-worker about the free posters by sending them a link to this article (https://www.youthchg.com/free-school-posters/), putting a mention on twitter, or by posting the link on your Facebook page, on your blog or similar location.
  2. Email us to tell us that you shared this offer with a colleague, then we'll email back to you the link to the free posters.
     

Get Your Free School Posters Right Here

We're going to give away two of our brand new, school posters. These beauties will be perfect for a fresh, new back-to-school look for your classroom.

First up, a funny school poster, followed by a more serious one.

The first free poster is a motivational message poster.

The second free poster is designed to help you reduce peer conflict and interaction problems.

Build a better new school year. Grab these free posters now.

 

free school poster A Funny
Free School Poster
 

Starting with Day 1, you want to motivate, motivate, motivate students.

This cute and silly poster gets the job done. This is Poster #301 and it says "They call it a diploma because it would be silly to call it a dollaroma. Every diploma doubles the dollars."

To get this poster as a free printable, follow the two quick steps listed above.

Prefer to buy the pre-printed version of this poster for $8, click here.


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Improve Student Behavior Now

 

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free school postersA Serious

Free School Poster
 

This poster focuses on a serious aspect of school: the meanness of students towards each other. Beginning this effort at the start of your school year can help curtail the problem before it starts.

Help control the amount of gossip that students spread about each other by getting this free poster, #294. It says "Gossip Hurts. Don't spread it. Say 'That's mean.'"

Created in response to requests from elementary school counselors, this poster is designed to work in elementary, middle school and high school classrooms.

To get this poster as a free printable, take the steps shown above.

You can also order this poster for $8 pre-printed.

 

We Have More New School Posters

school poster whining

See more of our newest posters here. Once on the page, sort by date, with most recent first. Posters #289 and higher are all brand new.

That's Poster #298 shown at left. It's just $8.

If you have a poster you would like us to make, be sure to let us know by emailing us.

 

 

 

 


 

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  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


The Best Back-to-School Bad Behavior-Busters– Includes Online Class with Surprising Strategies

 

student behavior management blog


The Best
Back-to-School
Bad Behavior-Busters


Includes Online Class
with Surprising Strategies

 


workshop trainer Ruth Herman Wells

If back-to-school means back to student behavior problems, then you're going to love the problem-stopping classroom management interventions we've packed inside this issue.

I'm Ruth Herman Wells, M.S., the Director and Trainer for Youth Change Workshops. For over two decades, I've been training teachers, counselors, principals, and youth professionals around North America. I really believe that I have the most dynamic, unusual, attention-grabbing classroom management methods to help you build a better new school year– no matter how much bad behavior you see in your classroom. In addition, ezinetag10 to the lively strategies described below, subscribers of this magazine, can try my new online class absolutely free, and get even more behavior change methods.

One of my newest online professional development classes is Control the Uncontrollable Student (click). Normally $39, this online course is offered without charge to you if you take the two steps described below.

Get Control Uncontrollable Students Online Class
  FREE!

Take 2 steps by 9-25-12:
(1) Tell your co-workers about our website (http://www.youthchg.com) by posting about us on your website, on your blog, your Facebook page (click), on Pinterest (click), or similar place. (2) Click here to email us the link to the page where you posted. We'll verify that you posted about us, then send you the link to the online class by return email. It's that easy.

 

The Best Back-to-School Bad Behavior-Busters

Motivation: As Close to Magic as You Can Get

motivational activity You know there's no magic answers when it comes to getting students to behave, but motivation may as be as close as you can get in the real world. Motivating your students to truly believe that education is the key to survival, can make everything better. In my live professional development classes, I sometimes pretend to switch the topic to funeral insurance, and ask the participants if they will stay in the room. No one ever wants to stay. Your students can't get up and leave physically, but they can leave in many other ways. The device shown here is just one of our thousands of motivational methods that can motivate, motivate, motivate! To print or save this cool behavior management device, simply click on the image or here.


Teach Specific Classroom Behavior Skills remote control student activity

Stop wishing there was a fun, fast way to stop constant classroom management problems like loud talk, interruptions, and run-on comments. We've got an intervention that offers everything you've wished for. Bring a television remote control to school and then you can "mute" students, "slow" them down, or "fast forward" them. Your whole class will be laughing and asking for a chance to operate the remote control. You will have transformed a chronic classroom management problem into a non-problem. Even better, you will find that by creatively training kids to be skilled students, almost any behavior problem can be improved or eliminated.

 

Provide On-Going School Skill Training quiet spray

 

Did you ever notice that while your school has an elaborate academic curriculum, it has no formal, equivalent curriculum for teaching kids how to be students so they can fully benefit from the academic instruction that is offered. Just as you must provide on-going assistance to learn and remember academics, you must provide on-going assistance to learn and remember school behavior skills. The humorous intervention pictured here, Quiet Spray, does just that. It is another example of how chronic classroom management problems can become history. To make a bottle of Quiet Spray, simply label a spray bottle accordingly. The bottle can be empty or you can add some plain or scented water to it. Teachers tell me, for best results, let students spray themselves. Some teachers comment that they can actually see students relax when they mist themselves– whether the bottle contains water or is empty. Either way, this easy-to-do, fun intervention is an almost sure bet to work in your K-12 classroom.

  •  


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    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Most of What You Know About Violent Students is Wrong– Includes Online Class with More Effective Strategies

 

classroom management problems blog

Most of What You Know About
Violent Students
is Wrong


Includes Online Class
with More Effective Strategies

 


workshop trainer Ruth Herman WellsAs a mental health counselor who specializes in working with hard-to-manage children and youth, it always makes me upset when I read another article disseminating misinformation about extremely violent,unmanageable kids.

For decades, mental health,juvenile corrections, and juvenile court professionals have had tested, documented methods to best manage unmanageable, violent students. Even though these tools have been widely available for a half century or so, most of these targeted techniques and time-tested insights into unmanageable kids have not reached most K-12 educators.

Today, another major education outlet printed yet another misguided article that urged teachers to build stronger relationships with their most severely misbehaved, violent students. The author asserted that relationship-building is the best way to reduce violence, bullying,cyberbullying, disrespect, defiance, property damage, and harm to others. That assertion isn't just wrong, it's dangerous.

Any mental health professional can tell you that strong student-teacher relationships are important with MOST students, but that relationship-based approaches always fail with the violent students who act out the most. Even worse, attempting to use relationship-based approaches with this population doesn't just fail big-time, but these tactics generate other problems.

Here is just one example of the serious fallout that occurs when counter-indicated methods are used: Relationship-building sends an unintended message to the seriously misbehaved student, who interprets the trust-building efforts to mean that the adult "doesn't have a clue who they're dealing with so I can do what I want and get away with anything." Just as no one single text book would work with all students, one single style of behavior management interventions will not work with all students.

When educators use one-size-fits-all methods with severely misbehaved students, they will find "nothing works." You may have already have discovered that nothing seems to work to rein in your most unmanageable students. Now, you know why.


I'm Ruth Herman Wells, M.S., the Director and Trainer for Youth Change
Workshops. This issue has must-have, tested, documented, established,
more effective strategies for unmanageable students. These behavior
management strategies will work better than the counter-indicated
approaches you are using now. These methods are taken from my new
online class, Control the Uncontrollable Student (click). These methods
are also offered in my live workshops, and on-site trainings. We have
special treat for the readers of this magazine: If you would like to take
the $39 Control the Uncontrollable Student online class FREE, see the
easy directions below.


online classGet Control Uncontrollable Students online class without charge.
Take 2 steps by 4-5-12:


(1) Post a link to our website (http://www.youthchg.com) online on
your website, blog, Facebook page, or similar place. (2) Click here to email us the link to the page where you posted. We'll send you the link to the online class by return email. It's that easy.

 

The Top 5 Truths About Unmanageable Students
That Educators Need to Know Now


1. Learn Targeted Methods for Conduct Disorders


Mental health professionals have identified that some extremely
misbehaved youngsters are wired a bit differently than the majority of
students. They tend to be boys, and make up about 11-14% of the
population. Mental health clinicians have the ability to determine if a
youngster has a problem called "conduct disorder," a mental health
diagnostic category that describes children and teens who have no
conscience, no remorse, no empathy, and no real relationship capacity.


Advanced research in the 1990s and into the 2000s has clearly shown
that the brains of these youngsters are different, that the place where
relationship capacity should "reside" in the brain is not "lit." That is why
relationship approaches will never work. Every educator must know
about this youngster since conventional approaches always fail with this
type of student. Targeted methods must be substituted instead. You'll
need more than the quick info included here so read more on our
website here or view our online class as described above.


2. Learn the Operating System of Conduct Disorders
 

Most students are relationship-based creatures, and relationship-based
approaches like character ed can be tried. Character ed is so popular
right now in the world of education. Sadly, popularity doesn't correlate
with effectiveness or even worthiness. Relationship-based methods like
character ed can never succeed with youngsters who have conduct
disorder as this disorder means that these students lack empathy. It
also means that their "operating system" is different than most other
students. Instead of having an operating system that is based on
relationships, youngsters with conduct disorder care about one thing: I-Me-
I-Me. Character ed methods don't address that. That's why you
have to learn and use methods designed especially to work around that
difference. What works? Read Step 3 below.
 

3. Learn Targeted Behavior Control Methods
 

Students with conduct disorder only care about what happens to them.
That's why all interventions with them must revolve around that
dynamic. If you look at the sites that have expertise with the most
acting-out students, places like juvenile corrections, for example, they
tend to use a specific style of interventions. These sites tend to be very
regimented, very strict, and to respond very quickly and strongly to
misconduct. They developed this style of intervention because it worked.
If relationship methods had worked, they would be using those instead,
but those techniques failed, so they switched to what worked better.
You need to switch too. With other types of students, use relationship
methods if they work for you, but stop expecting them to ever help
conduct disordered kids behave better.


4. Avoid the Predictable Pitfalls
 

Students with conduct disorder are often very savvy. They can read us
like open comic books and easily manipulate us. There are many
predictable mistakes that caring adults can make over and over again
unless taught to do otherwise. What is one of the most common pitfalls
that will get you played? These youngsters may discern that you are a
good-hearted person, so they may manipulate you by getting you to
believe that you have shown them the error of their ways. Because of
that, be careful about automatically believing when the extremely
misbehaved child suddenly expresses remorse or sheds copious tears.
Instead, discern if there will be any benefit from expressing remorse.
For example, if apologizing gets the sanctions for misbehavior lessened,
then you want to be careful about believing that the remorse is
genuine.

Students with conduct disorders are very manipulative. Even
though it may be uncomfortable for some of us to acknowledge, it's part
of what they often do. All of us need to accept that premise in order to
be effective working with these youngsters. When you are repeatedly
vulnerably to the pitfalls, the student can easily manipulate and control
you and your classroom.
 

5. The Whole Team Must Know How to Control Conduct Disorders
 

The best way to manage unmanageable students is for every member
of your team to learn the do's and don'ts. That includes the school
secretary, and the bus driver who has to turn his back to even the
most aggressive students. When the whole staff understands how to use
different tools with these students, misbehavior can be more easily
curtailed. Sadly, the reverse is true: When the whole staff does not
know how to use targeted tools, then it becomes party time for your
most acting-out students, who are savvy enough to save their worst
behavior for the staff who are least likely to be able to manage them.

You need to have every link in the chain be strong. Your success with
conduct disordered students will be only as good as your weakest link,
so thoroughly educate everyone who is expected to be able manage
even the most unmanageable students.

  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


The Best Apathy-Busters: Turnaround Bad Attitudes With These Innovative Interventions

 

teacher blog articles


The Best
Apathy-Busters:


Turnaround Bad Attitudes
With These Innovative Interventions

 

 

If you are seeing more and more apathetic and negative students, you will love the use-now strategies included in this issue. These innovative, attention-grabbing methods are especially designed to work when conventional approaches fail, and were developed to turnaround even the most negative, entrenched child or teen. I'm Ruth Herman Wells, M.S., the Director and Trainer for Youth Change Workshops, and these dynamic strategies are taken from my live, online, and on-site training workshops, as well as from my Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth books and posters.
 

Student Apathy Strategies


Strategy #1

 

School Pays Off

Student apathy posterApathetic students might see more value to school if they knew the pay-off for education. You can use this method verbally, as a poster, as a discussion starter, or as an activity. At left, you can see the intervention. It's our Poster #45. You can view additional, similar posters here.
The poster says: Graduates accept free education and a free diploma so they earn $329,000 more than everybody else. Each diploma doubles the dollars."

 

Strategy #2

 

Reach Beyond the Bluster

For kids who are "wrapped in barbed wire," their apathy and harshness hiding a very gentle and vulnerable child, ask them to decide which they would rather have: "a bruised heart or a boxed heart?" This can be a very effective intervention strategy with students who are guarded and prickly due to negative experiences with adults who are supposed to be consistent, caring role models. A follow-up activity: have the student create art or poetry illustrating some of the phrases shown in quotes above. This activity is best done one-to-one, in small groups, or used by counselors and mental health professionals.


Strategy #3

 

Reality Wins All Arguments

While lots of youngsters complain about their circumstances, some kids complain a lot and often about where they ended up. Some of these youngsters have plenty of legitimate reasons to complain, and some of
them don't. Either way, you can encourage your discouraged complainers to "bloom where they're planted." This is a wonderful intervention for several populations. For example, this approach has worked well with foster kids who are not happy to be moving a new foster care placement. The lyrical phrases shown above work really well as the basis for illustrations by students. Poetry, essays, collages, and other creative activities can also produce some very inspiring, memorable results, and initiate the change you want to engender.

 

Strategy #4

 

Hey, It's Me Plus 25

If you work with youngsters so apathetic or discouraged that they can't really imagine ever having a positive future, or any future at all, ask them to write an email or letter to you as though 25 years have elapsed. In the letter, students can describe what happened to them since they last saw you. For non-writers, they can draw or make a video or audio recording instead of writing, or, you can write for them. Students can make blog entries if they prefer that to a simple letter or email. Here's a variation for students who really resist this strategy: Have them make the letter be about someone else, perhaps a friend or someone they admire or feel neutral about. Once the letter is complete, you will have indirectly learned a lot about the letter's creator, even though the document is ostensibly about a third party. For students, who say "they don't care," ask them to complete the task as if they did care (even though they say they don't care).

 

Strategy #5

 

You Choose

Put the following phrase on the board and ask students to discuss: "This strategy is especially useful for children and youth who hurt themselves, abuse substances, are in gangs, or self-endanger. For younger students and for some other youngsters, you may wish to change the phrase to be a bit gentler. You can use this phrasing instead: "The same power you have to hurt yourself, you have to help yourself." Emotions fuel behaviors. The more you can help students manage their emotions, the less those emotions will interfere with school and education.


Strategy #6

 

When Crime Doesn't Pay

For kids who plan to use illegal activities as their source of future income, you can have a lot of impact by pointing out some surprising realities of your local, state and federal laws. For example, depending on which laws they break, offenders can lose not only the money gained by illegal actions, but also their home, possessions, and vehicles. Under some federal laws, the homes and possessions of relatives and friends may be seized even if these items weren't directly involved in the commission of the crime. It's important to stay aware that illegal activities are not near as lucrative as your kids tell you. Auto theft generates about $18,000 per year, for example, less than what a typical high school grad earns. Even worse, the authorities can take anything related to the auto theft while no one can just take away the graduate's money.
 

  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Bring Order to Behavior Disorders Insider Secrets for Controlling Uncontrollable Students

 

school counselor blog


Bring Order to
Behavior Disorders:
Insider Secrets for
Controlling Uncontrollable Students

 

Some students' behavior goes beyond just being extremely misbehaved. Some students actually have mental health problems that are called behavior disorders.

Counselor training includes extensive preparation to manage each type of behavior disorder. That is why counselors can sometimes more successfully manage youngsters that educators struggle to control. Most counselors learn specialized behavior management tools tailored for each type of acting-out disorder. Most of these targeted tools work really well for educators too– except that educators are not normally routinely offered this essential training on behavior disorders.

While we are all aware of the hazards of labeling students, we have to have some shorthand to know exactly who we're talking about. If we didn't call a rose a rose, some of us might think Shakespeare was talking about dandelions. If we describe the flower each time, we can end up pretty confused, and long-winded too: "that red, no, I mean pink, no, it's white, no, it's a yellow flower that smells really sweet and may bloom all summer." So, as you read this article, of course you want to be sensitive about students being labeled, but hopefully you can agree that the use of common mental health terms will assure that we all know exactly which students– and which behavior disorders– we're talking about.

workshop trainer Ruth Herman WellsI'm Ruth Herman Wells, M.S., the Director and Trainer for Youth Change Workshops. At Youth Change, we firmly believe that educators and other non-mental health workers are smart enough to make those distinctions. This article will help you understand the categories and corresponding tools to use– or not use– with each type of student. In this issue, we will focus particularly on a single type of behavior disorder.

Unless you're a mental health professional, you can't diagnose the
disorders featured in this article. But you've never been able to diagnose other disorders– like ADHD, for example– but you most certainly have learned how to fine tune how you work with youngsters you believe could have that difficulty. Using that type of adjustment process of carefully tailoring your interventions without diagnosing will work for any mental health disorder that you think you might be encountering. While a diagnosis from a mental health worker would be incredibly useful, you can still work successfully with severely unmanageable youngsters either way.

There are two major mental health disorders that characterize the most extremely misbehaved students. Some youngsters have Oppositional-Defiant Disorder. That is a mental health diagnosis that describes kids that have consciences but sometimes act like they don't. This diagnosis can only be applied by a mental health professional but will be very important for any youth worker to know about and understand. This diagnosis is far more hopeful than the second disorder, "Conduct Disorder," which means the child lacks a conscience and a real capacity for relationships. While the oppositional-defiant child (ODD) may also appear to have little
conscience or relationship capacity, you may be able to improve that
difficulty with the right approach and methods. With conduct disorder (CD), such improvement isn't possible.
 

Understanding Oppositional Defiant Disorder & Conduct Disorder


WHAT DOES OPPOSITIONAL-DEFIANT DISORDER LOOK LIKE?

Oppositional-defiant kids are often some of your most misbehaved students. They may disrupt your class, hurt others, defy authority and engage in illegal or problematic conduct. Though students with ODD may look similar to conduct disorders, their bad behavior is usually less severe, less frequent, and of shorter duration. The ODD label is often inaccurately applied as this dynamic can be a difficult concept to grasp and apply correctly. Because many mental health professionals understandably hesitate to assign the heavy-duty conduct disorder label, they sometimes use the diagnosis of ODD as kind of a parking spot. This convention results in people using methods for ODD with conduct disordered youngsters who would have potentially benefitted from methods for CDs instead. CDs will be adversely affected and poorly managed by the use of strategies designed for students with ODD. In this issue, we are focusing on strategies for children and teens who appear to have ODD.


THE 3 AREAS OF HELP FOR ODD YOUTH

To help the child with ODD, you must focus on:

  1. Skill building
  2. "Pulling up" that conscience– example strategies are below
  3. Improving their relationship skills.


For skill building, teaching them how to regulate their anger, actions, peer skills, verbal output, etc. will be critical. (Note that CDs benefit from this training as well.) But equally important, the child with ODD must be aided to care about others, and to be guided more by conscience. (Note that CDs almost never benefit from this type of aid, and usually become more out-of-control as they assume the adult has "no clue" if they are using methods that involve utterly foreign and irrelevant concepts like conscience, remorse, guilt, and trust.)

In our workshops, we give dozens of effective interventions for stimulating the conscience of children and teens who evidence ODD. We will supply a
few of the best here. These interventions will only focus on stimulating that conscience or "compensating" for it. If you want more than the handful of ideas given here, or you want to see how to build skills and relationship capacity– those other two key intervention areas for students who evidence ODD– consider signing up for our live or online distance learning workshop, or purchasing some of our books that will deliver hundreds of the solutions you need.


STRATEGIES TO STIMULATE OR SIMULATE THE CONSCIENCE

for Students Who Appear to Have ODD

You can use these methods with or without the diagnosis. Remember that these interventions must be combined with the other key focus areas for students with ODD: skill training and relationship training. Also, remember these methods are not appropriate for use with that other type of very misbehaved youngster, children with conduct disorder.

 

STRATEGY #1

Before a child undertakes a problem behavior, ask the youth to imagine that s/he will read about that act on the cover of the local newspaper
in the morning. Ask the child their reaction. If they say that they wouldn't want to read about it in the newspaper the next morning, then you can say "Then don't do it!" This image makes a fast and easy guide for kids to follow to evaluate whether or not to do questionable behaviors. This intervention is a good choice to use with children whose conscience provides little guidance.

 

STRATEGY #2

This intervention can be used before or after the child has engaged in
misbehavior. For example, let's say the child has stolen the teacher's pen, you can say "I want you to imagine that we're making a video about your life. Are you impressed?" That uncomfortable sensation that the child may have in reaction to this intervention may be the conscience stirring.

 

STRATEGY #3

After the child has engaged in a problem behavior, such as stealing a pen, as in the example above, ask the child, "So what's your integrity worth to you?"

 

STRATEGY #4

To adapt the intervention shown above for young children, simply rephrase the question to "So what's people believing in you, worth to you?" Or, rephrase it to "So what's people trusting you, worth to you?"

 

STRATEGY #5

Have students list problem behaviors, and write their responses in a column on a board. Next, in a second column, have them list the most likely consequences of each behavior. Inform students that they can no longer say "I didn't know what was going to happen next," or make similar disclaimers because they have just shown they can make good guesses to predict the future. This strategy is another substitute for the conscience  as students can "guess ahead" before choosing to engage in problem behaviors.

  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


School Skills Training 101 How to Be a Student: The Most Important Class That Schools Never Offer

 

classroom management blog


School Skills Training 101
How to Be a Student:
The Most Important Class
That Schools Never Offer

 


workshop trainer Ruth Herman WellsThere could almost be a sign hanging on the front door of your school: "Students Wanted: No Training Provided."

I'm Youth Change Workshop's Director, Ruth Herman Wells. As a staff trainer who has led professional development workshops in every corner of North America, I have to say that very few school districts have a formal plan to train kids to become successful students. Years ago, parents routinely taught their offspring to look, act, and sound like students. Now, many families can't or won't give their children the motivation, attitudes, and specific School Skills they need to succeed in school. For all the research, fads, opinions, debates, and testing, this is the elephant in the classroom– that School Behavior Skills are universally expected but seldom taught.

It doesn't take years of research to determine that it is probably completely unrealistic to expect children to perform tasks they've never been taught. Schools expect a wide range of skills from students, from attendance and punctuality to recognizing the value of education, from showing respect for the teacher to wearing appropriate attire, from chair-sitting skills to homework management skills, and from class discussion skills to interacting with peers.

Can you imagine what would happen if schools expected students to know academic skills that were never taught? A plan like that could only end in disaster– but everyday, teachers expect children to use School Skills that they were never taught. Unsurprisingly, many youngsters fail to perform these untaught skills, and that is a big part of why there are so many  serious, persistent behavior problems in today's schools. Having never been taught essential School Skills, it is inevitable that violence, bullying, work refusal, tardiness, dropping out, truancy, disrespect, and misconduct dominate many classrooms and campuses.

If schools did teach kids School Skills, what would it look like? Below is a quick glimpse of School Skills Training 101: How to Be a Student, the most important class that schools never offer.


Teach
School Skills
BEHAVIORS

Have you ever stopped to consider the massive number of skills kids are expected to have in order to become successful students? They must arrive on time, hear the homework assignment, bring required school supplies, raise their hands to be called on, maintain focus, and take tests and quizzes. That long list is just a fraction of the key skills students need to succeed, so you may wonder where do you begin to train kids to be students. You can start anywhere you want. Whether talk-outs or  disrespect or tardiness is your top concern, it's fine to start there. Ideally, there would be a formal game plan for Pre-K through Grade 12, so the training would be more systematic, but in the meantime, start with whatever skills are most critical to you to successfully teach. Here is an example of one school district's Pre-K through Grade 12 School Skills Training Curriculum plan.
 

 

Teach
School Skills
MOTIVATION


Whenever I train teachers and principals, there often seems to be a bit of a sense of resignation about the apathy and disinterest many students evidence, almost a "there's nothing that can be done" reaction. While most educators may never have been offered extensive training to discover effective strategies to motivate very unmotivated students, powerful, compelling interventions do exist to turnaround the rampant apathy and disinterest. Stop and think about how different your students might be if they saw the tremendous value of education. Motivation– or the lack of– underlies almost everything you attempt to accomplish with students. Talking alone probably won't improve the problem. You must choose interventions that are lively and so attention-grabbing that they can compete with cell phones, video games, TV, movies, and all the other contemporary attractions that vie for your students' attention. Our posters give you an instant look at our lively motivational methods.


Teach
School Skills
ATTITUDE

motivational poster 143Just as many educators appear resigned to their students' lack of motivation, many also seem resigned to the negative attitudes that are
equally common. Like motivation, students' attitudes color every activity you attempt to do with them. Like motivation, if the students' attitudes were improved, that improvement would have positive impact on all aspects of education because the youngsters would be so transformed. Despite the huge impact of students' attitudes, few schools have any formal plan to address the negativity, and few educators have received any practical training to learn specific strategies to engender more positive outlooks. That omission from educator training is truly discouraging, because so many forceful, effective intervention strategies exist to help students have more positive attitudes about school and education. Yes, bad attitudes may be commonplace now, but they don't have to be commonplace tomorrow. Pictured above is just one intervention (Poster #143) from our collection of hundreds. These potent, unexpected strategies are especially designed to work with resistant, oppositional students, and to work when more conventional methods would fail. Obviously, no single intervention will reverse the negativity, but this sample strategy does provide a great example of the powerful attitude adjustment methods that exist but unfortunately, may not be in wide use.

 

Teach
School Skills
HOW AND WHEN TO TEACH

Studies suggest that the typical teacher loses 22 minutes per hour to on-demand behavior management. That is a loss of several hours per day. School Skills Training instruction requires just minutes per day but can give you back so many of those lost 22 minutes per class period in return. Some teachers set aside a block of time each day, others take just 5 minutes at the start of each class. It doesn't matter how you structure the training, so long as you offer the training pro-actively. No longer are you vulnerable to students' misbehavior because you have thoroughly and systematically taught your youngsters to look, act, and sound like students. They can become veterans at managing the behaviors, attitudes, and motivation they've previously struggled with. It's your choice: You can continue to work with untrained, unmotivated students who evidence bad attitudes, or you can turn all that around with School Skills Training, and as an added bonus start to love your job again.

The U.S. education system is perpetually stuck, darting from trend to trend, while enmeshed in unhealthy, distracting politics and high-stakes testing. A common sense, real-world approach like School Skills Training could solve a lot of what's wrong with K-12 education, but since School Skills Training can't be described in a quick sound bite, isn't a new educational fad, isn't politically connected, and has nothing to do with testing, it probably doesn't have much of a chance of ever gaining widespread national notice. That shouldn't stop you from using School Skills Training to transform your classroom and school.

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    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Next Generation Classroom Management Tools

 

classroom management blog


Next Generation
Classroom Management Tools

 


workshop trainer Ruth Herman WellsSchool Skills Training can change your life, and the lives of your students.

School Skills Training interventions give you next generation classroom management strategies today. My name is Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I'm the director of Youth Change Workshops, and creator of School Skills Training strategies.

School Skills Training means that you teach your youngsters how to be students, just like you teach your youngsters academic subject matter.

Amazingly, most school districts have carefully crafted, elaborate plans for teaching academic content, but no curriculum at all to teach the foundation School Skills that youngsters need to fully take advantage of academic offerings.

School Skills Training should include teaching students to be motivated, appropriately dressed, how to interact with other students, how to ride the bus, behave in the hallways, and also how to complete assignments, attend every school day, and have acceptable teacher interaction skills.

If you try it, you'll find that teaching kids to be students works much better than just stating the rules and expectations. Without having School Skills, students will struggle to follow the rules and avoid consequences. With School Skills, students are practiced veterans at performing the skills they need for school, and now can achieve their full potential.

 

Next Generation Classroom Management Interventions

You're going to use these creative, unexpected, next generation of classroom management strategies every day you teach


Stop Classroom Management Problems
TEACH MOTIVATION FOR EVERY SUBJECT
Including Reading

Literacy Poster #185If you want students to care about school and the academics you offer, you will have to teach them the value of school– especially if parents are not selling the value of  education for you. Poster #185, pictured here, works both as a poster or a worksheet.

The scrambled text says "This is what life is like if you can't read."

What a provocative, compelling, attention-grabbing way to help your students grasp the minute-by-minute, second-by-second importance of reading to functioning in the world.

To order these full size, color, glossy posters, for $8 each, click here.

 

Stop Classroom Management Problems
TEACH SPECIFIC SKILLS
Including How to Follow the Dress Code


Dress Code Poster #196Stop hassling chronic behavior problems by training your students to have the skills and motivation they need to comply with your school's dress code. Yes, it is possible to stop the unending struggle to get students to dress appropriately for school, especially if you show them how  mastering what to wear to school  prepares them for what to wear in their future jobs of choice.

Poster #196 begins to convince students that if they can't dress appropriately for school, they aren't going to be ready to dress correctly for the adult work place, and the jobs and careers they say they want to succeed in as adults.

To order this poster for $8, click here.

 

Stop Classroom Management Problems
TEACH STUDENTS TO AVOID MISCONDUCT
Including How to Stop Cyberbullying


cyberbullying poster 280When you were being trained to be a teacher, cyberbullying hadn't been invented, so you may feel unprepared to tackle a problem that can happen both in and out of school.

The reality of our world today is that you have to teach every School Skill behavior you want to happen or stop happening in the classroom and school.

This printable can be used to start a discussion, or students can use it as a template to illustrate what is and is not cyberbullying. This printable appears to be a familiar social networking site that is often used for bullying.

Until students are clear on what words, phrases, actions, postings, and text constitute cyberbullying, you are going to struggle to gain compliance. While it's just a first step, helping students become clear on what is and is not cyberbullying is a must-do first step.

Without an education on the topic, it is too easy for youngsters to claim "But I didn't think it was cyberbullying." Take that excuse off the table before students even start to use it this school year.

To order Poster 280, click here.

 

  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.