Successful School Discipline: How to Get Students to Follow the Rules

 

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Successful School Discipline:
How to Get Students to Follow the Rules

 

student discipline

Bullies in Class discipline

Classroom and school discipline can be the toughest part of any teacher’s or principal’s job. Even though discipline problems can dominate many school days, teacher training tends to be focused 80% on content and a mere 20% on behavior management and discipline. Many teachers and principals report receiving even less instruction on discipline, and student classroom management and behavior problems are often cited as the top reasons that teachers leave the profession entirely.

In our Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth professional development workshops (coming soon to Seattle on May 4-5, 2017), we devote hours teaching you how to have excellent student behavior management. It is also most definitely one of the most requested topics that our workshop participants ask us to cover. I’m the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop instructor, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. In this article, I’ll give you a peek into some of the top strategies we offer in our professional development inservice sessions. While this is certainly not a comprehensive article, it has some of our best tips to get you started on the path to successful school discipline. If you need more than the sampling of ideas briefly covered in this short how-to article, consider signing up for our Seattle Breakthrough Strategies Workshop sessions on May 4-5, 2017, where we will provide a whopping 200 interventions, all designed to produce successful classroom and school discipline.

 

Successful School Discipline:
How to Get Students to Follow the Rules

teacher classroom managementConvince Students of the

Importance of Rules

Many of us– whether young or old– fail to reliably follows rules and policies that we find to be unreasonable. Many very reasonable classroom and school rules are viewed by students to be totally bogus, and they act accordingly, and discipline suffers. To improve compliance with school and classroom rules, convince your students of the importance of those policies. Here is a fast and memorable way to accomplish just that. Remember: students who see value in the rules are far more likely to reliably follow those rules.

This strategy is a role reversal and many students can be offered the opportunity to participate in it. Ask one of your students to become the role play teacher. You may wish to choose a student who normally resists or ignores school or classroom rules. Offer the student a great prize in lieu of the paycheck that teachers earn. The prize can be anything that is enticing, such as getting out of class a bit early, or soda pop, or stickers, or whatever fits your age group. To earn the prize, the role-play teacher merely needs to teach the class to remember a 5 digit number. Sounds so easy, doesn’t it? But, this is a classroom with no rules. Even worse for the role play teacher, you’ve distributed a lot of the things you don’t want to see in class, items like bubble gum, snacks, cell phones, etc. If necessary, you can also prime several students to engage in other problematic behaviors like talk outs, being out of their seat, and so on.

The role play teacher attempts to teach your classroom and quickly discovers that it’s impossible. With your prompting, encourage the role play teacher to set rules, and attach the role play teacher’s name to the rules. Next, have him or her write the new rules on the board. After a while, retire your first role play teacher and give other class members a chance to experience teaching in a classroom without rules. Once enough students have gotten to experience the extreme difficulty of trying to teach in a class without rules, discuss whether there just might be values in rules. Not only will students view the rules differently, they are far more likely to follow them because their names are now attached to your classroom rules, and they are the ones that created those rules. Students are unlikely to hassle rules they created and named. You will be delighted at the difference in your classroom and school.

 

Teach Skills

Because Consequences

Will Never Compensate

control temper help

 

Many educators believe that if they simply have big enough consequences for school and classroom rule violations, that those sanctions are the way to ensure successful discipline. Sadly, that assumption is often completely wrong. If I say to you that unless you start speaking Swedish right now, you are going to face terrible consequences, most people in the U.S. still can’t speak Swedish. When you say to your students that if you engage in problematic conduct, you will face big sanctions, that is really no different.

If you want to excellent student behavior management and discipline, you must teach the behaviors that you expect– and also motivate students to see the importance of complying with the expectations, as discussed above. The clearest illustration is to look at your rules regarding the use of violence. Students who grow up in a violent family, for example, may have no idea how control their fist, mouth and actions. At home and in their neighborhood, using their fists may be commonplace, and consistently using more socially acceptable behaviors may be unfamiliar and seem undoable, just like you speaking Swedish on command. To expect a consequence to compensate for that deficit is naive and unrealistic, yet that is often what happens when schools expect students to magically change their behavior just because a heavy duty consequence can result. If you truly want student conduct to be better, you are going to have to teach those specific behaviors in an organized, step-by-step manner, very similar to the way you teach specific academic subjects. Further, just as you would never expect a student to magically or instantly learn calculus or to read, students can’t suddenly master self-control behavior skills.

Pictured above is a sample student worksheet that teaches acceptable behavior instead of aggression. It is from our Temper and Tantrum Tamers lesson book. Our website has thousands of resources that teach students self-control but our books, live professional development inservice workshops and online courses are your best bet.

 

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discipline postersBut My Classroom Is Completely Unmanageable

The truth is that some of you are still reading this article because your classroom or school seems really out of control, and there doesn’t seem to be any clear path toward reversing a worsening trend. Here is your solution:

First, if the classroom has really been quite out of control, it is usually far easier to start over than to clean up the existing situation. So, you will need declare Room 630 History Class or Mt. Vernon Elementary’s 3rd Grade Room 50 done and gone. Rename the space and start over. However, you must be able to re-start incredibly strong and firm or you will quickly find yourself back where you started.

Second, to avoid ever getting into this situation at all, we always recommend you start your school year being way too firm and strong in how you manage students. If you decide later to ease up, no student will fight you. However, if you start off a bit weak, indecisive or you are easily played by students, I can guarantee that you will not be able to easily– or perhaps ever– tighten up as students will fight hard to maintain the chaos, commotion and disruption that has become the standard. When you re-start, you must acknowledge the problems that occurred, clearly state what will be different, and then make sure that the new version of your classroom is firmly managed, with strict consequences, along with regular training that shows students how to meet behavior and discipline expectations. You will also need to motivate your students to see the value in school and education because a motivated student is far less likely to fritter away their education on misbehavior. Poster #471 (shown at right) is just one of our thousands of motivation-makers that transform kids into motivated learners. Our live conferences, online professional development seminars and books all can guide you because Youth Change Professional Development Workshops is your school discipline and behavior management expert. We are your classroom management authority, and we specialize in preventing and fixing serious, persistent behavior management problems. We’re here to help. You can email us here.

 

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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Expert Help with Student Acting-Out, Behavior and Classroom Management

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

More Behavior and Classroom Management

Q & A

From

The Breakthrough Strategies

 

Professional Development Workshop

 
 

 

Our Behavior and Classroom Management Blog issues that answer your questions are always so popular. We  have listened to the many subscribers who wrote in, and will answer more of your questions again in this issue. Just like the participants in our live Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop, it is clear that subscribers like to set the topics, and get immediate solutions for their most challenging "kid problems."

As always, children and teens acting-out is a hot topic, but this blog issue also takes a look at child and adolescent self-harm, which can be thought of as acting-in.

classroom management expertThe questions featured in this issue come from our recent Breakthrough Strategies Workshops' participants. If you would like to attend one of our upcoming behavior and classroom management conferences, our professional development schedule is here.

I'm Youth Change Workshops Director and Professional Development Instructor Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. and I'm here to answer your questions so email us any queries you have.

 

classroom management trainingMore of Our Best Answers to Your Questions
 

About Troubled and Problem Youth & Children

 

Q: Maryann is a school counselor in Pemberton, NJ. She requested "strategies to use for children who seek attention by acting out."

A: Maryann, we did a whole issue on this subject several months ago, perhaps before you were a subscriber, so it's too soon to devote a whole issue to this topic, but let me give you a couple favorites.

► There is an old saying: "children would rather be praised than punished, but they'd rather be punished than ignored." With that in mind, wait for the acting-out student to be properly behaved, and then offer attention. Although misbehavior compels the adults to give attention, it starts a cycle of misbehavior netting attention, so by acting out, a student can extract notice. That's the exact opposite of what you want to occur so catch your students "doing good" and offer attention then. You are eliminating the need to act out to be noticed. There are even stickers you can buy for younger students that say "Caught doing good."

► Class clowns are the classic example of students who chronically act out. Be sure that teachers have their class establish a recommended number of times to talk out, then expect students to follow that standard. Without a quantifiable standard, you are expecting students to adhere to a standard that is unspecified. That isn't fair or reasonable. For class clowns, work with them to learn about the proper frequency of comments, the correct type of content, and appropriate duration. If you can channel the input to be appropriate, you will give that student lifelong skills to be beloved in the work place for making light, well-timed, often much-needed, humorous comments. You have transformed acting out into a potential, major work place asset. Everyone loves the co-worker who can break up the staff meeting with a well- timed, wry comment or socially acceptable joke.

expert classroom management

Q: Theresa, who teaches kindergarten, wants more of a focus on younger children. She writes: "I'm not a new teacher (15 years) but, the behaviors I have seen and dealt with the past two to three years are becoming much more common. Out of a class of 16, 8 of them have really horrible behaviors. One even killed a cat this year! Thanks so much…I would love to come to a workshop if you are ever in Wichita, KS."

A: If you let us know that Kansas schools and children's agencies aren't facing desperate budgets, we may look at hosting a session in your state. We try to host classes in regions where youth professionals have an adequate professional development budget. Right now, the closest we'll get is Texas or Indiana, which isn't exactly close. You can always ask your school district, professional association, teachers' conference, or local Education Service Center to sponsor a class. It's been a while since one of the Kansas Ed Service Centers hosted us. Or consider the course online. Now, if you had taken our Breakthrough Strategies class, or if you have been very carefully reading this blog, then you would know the answer to this question. Theresa and everybody else: before reading further, stop and consider if you already know the answer to this query, because we have touched on the answer a lot in previous issues of this magazine– and we devote hours to the subject in class.

The most misbehaved children may be "conduct disorders." From past issues or class, you may remember that those words refer to a specific mental health category that describes the most out of control students. While only a counselor can diagnose, anyone can be concerned that a child falls into this category. Theresa, here is the critical element: you must work completely differently with these students. If you use conventional methods, you will find "nothing works."

For Theresa and others of you with very young students, here's more bad news: the younger the severe misbehavior begins, the worst the outlook. The good news: if more professionals could identify and correctly work with young conduct disorders, the better the chance of aiding that child to avoid that otherwise grim prognosis for the future. Sadly, without targeted intervention, conduct disorders are at high risk of violating the law, and ending up imprisoned. Properly working with that 5 year old conduct disorder today can have incredible impact on his future. That is why Theresa's question is so important.

Anytime you have a young (or older) child doing the most extreme behaviors such as animal abuse, that should be a "red flag" to alert you to consider using the specialized methods that work with conduct disorders. The second and third issues of this magazine offered you an glimpse into this large population, and Theresa, you use exactly the same type of methods with both older and younger students. You can read a lot more information from other Behavior and Classroom Management Blog issues in our detailed Blog Index. You can also just look in the brief Blog Index (at right) for articles listed under "Conduct Disorders." However, a few articles will not substitute for fully upgrading your skills with this growing population.

Anytime you have a young (or older) child doing the most extreme behaviors such as animal abuse, that should be a "red flag" to alert you to consider using the specialized methods that work with conduct disorders. The second and third issues of this magazine offered you an glimpse into this large population, and Theresa, you use exactly the same type of methods with both older and younger students.
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Q: Here is the email we got from Angela: "My topic suggestion is one that I do not think is addressed enough anywhere– self-mutilation. It is a far more common problem than once thought."

A: Angela, you didn't tell us your job, or where you were from, but wherever you are and whatever your job, you are correct. If you are a counselor, you may have noted the increase in the amount of disturbed youngsters, especially in the early grades. The answer we give to your query is going to depend on your job. We are going to play the odds and guess that you are a teacher since we have more teachers as subscribers than counselors. Let's hope we guess right.

If you are not a mental health professional, then whenever you have specific data to suggest active self-harm, you need to immediately notify your administrator or counselor. Only counselors and other mental health workers should be managing behaviors that could be– or become– life threatening. I am not saying that superficial cutting of the wrist automatically indicates a potential suicide attempt, but ensuring the child's safety must be the job of the mental health worker, and there are no exceptions to that– even if your budget-crunched school lacks a counselor. You will need their guidance, and there is no work-around that is worth risking a child's life.

Even though non-mental health workers must consult a counselor, you still need to understand what makes these children tick, and adapt how you work with them. Plus, other behaviors may really be, or border on self- harm. For example, extreme tattooing or piercings, reckless driving, and serious promiscuity are just a few examples. To understand these youngsters, remember that distressed children don't manage their distress in "appropriate" ways. They don't enter class and say "I feel neglected so I would like additional interaction and nurturance today." They manage their distress in primitive, inappropriate ways like self-mutilation.

For non-counselors, you want to adjust how you work with the child by striking the balance between your mission and the child's distress. That means that when the child is distressed, you may lower the expectations. On days the child is more functional, you increase expectations. You also observe for safety concerns and let your mental health worker guide you on all else. Even if you lack an on- site counselor, it is not wise to learn counseling by practicing on a distressed youngster. Instead of counseling these students, be nurturing, involved, alert, and available. Offer them time, and listen to what they say– and don't say. Ask them what they need.

Sometimes, these youngsters just want someone to notice. But leave the counseling to those trained to do it. Even if you have to move heaven and earth to arrange it, your energy is best spent ensuring that each hurting child has access to a capable counselor who knows exactly how to help.

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Bring Order to Behavior Disorders Insider Secrets for Controlling Uncontrollable Students

 

school counselor blog


Bring Order to
Behavior Disorders:
Insider Secrets for
Controlling Uncontrollable Students

 

Some students' behavior goes beyond just being extremely misbehaved. Some students actually have mental health problems that are called behavior disorders.

Counselor training includes extensive preparation to manage each type of behavior disorder. That is why counselors can sometimes more successfully manage youngsters that educators struggle to control. Most counselors learn specialized behavior management tools tailored for each type of acting-out disorder. Most of these targeted tools work really well for educators too– except that educators are not normally routinely offered this essential training on behavior disorders.

While we are all aware of the hazards of labeling students, we have to have some shorthand to know exactly who we're talking about. If we didn't call a rose a rose, some of us might think Shakespeare was talking about dandelions. If we describe the flower each time, we can end up pretty confused, and long-winded too: "that red, no, I mean pink, no, it's white, no, it's a yellow flower that smells really sweet and may bloom all summer." So, as you read this article, of course you want to be sensitive about students being labeled, but hopefully you can agree that the use of common mental health terms will assure that we all know exactly which students– and which behavior disorders– we're talking about.

workshop trainer Ruth Herman WellsI'm Ruth Herman Wells, M.S., the Director and Trainer for Youth Change Workshops. At Youth Change, we firmly believe that educators and other non-mental health workers are smart enough to make those distinctions. This article will help you understand the categories and corresponding tools to use– or not use– with each type of student. In this issue, we will focus particularly on a single type of behavior disorder.

Unless you're a mental health professional, you can't diagnose the
disorders featured in this article. But you've never been able to diagnose other disorders– like ADHD, for example– but you most certainly have learned how to fine tune how you work with youngsters you believe could have that difficulty. Using that type of adjustment process of carefully tailoring your interventions without diagnosing will work for any mental health disorder that you think you might be encountering. While a diagnosis from a mental health worker would be incredibly useful, you can still work successfully with severely unmanageable youngsters either way.

There are two major mental health disorders that characterize the most extremely misbehaved students. Some youngsters have Oppositional-Defiant Disorder. That is a mental health diagnosis that describes kids that have consciences but sometimes act like they don't. This diagnosis can only be applied by a mental health professional but will be very important for any youth worker to know about and understand. This diagnosis is far more hopeful than the second disorder, "Conduct Disorder," which means the child lacks a conscience and a real capacity for relationships. While the oppositional-defiant child (ODD) may also appear to have little
conscience or relationship capacity, you may be able to improve that
difficulty with the right approach and methods. With conduct disorder (CD), such improvement isn't possible.
 

Understanding Oppositional Defiant Disorder & Conduct Disorder


WHAT DOES OPPOSITIONAL-DEFIANT DISORDER LOOK LIKE?

Oppositional-defiant kids are often some of your most misbehaved students. They may disrupt your class, hurt others, defy authority and engage in illegal or problematic conduct. Though students with ODD may look similar to conduct disorders, their bad behavior is usually less severe, less frequent, and of shorter duration. The ODD label is often inaccurately applied as this dynamic can be a difficult concept to grasp and apply correctly. Because many mental health professionals understandably hesitate to assign the heavy-duty conduct disorder label, they sometimes use the diagnosis of ODD as kind of a parking spot. This convention results in people using methods for ODD with conduct disordered youngsters who would have potentially benefitted from methods for CDs instead. CDs will be adversely affected and poorly managed by the use of strategies designed for students with ODD. In this issue, we are focusing on strategies for children and teens who appear to have ODD.


THE 3 AREAS OF HELP FOR ODD YOUTH

To help the child with ODD, you must focus on:

  1. Skill building
  2. "Pulling up" that conscience– example strategies are below
  3. Improving their relationship skills.


For skill building, teaching them how to regulate their anger, actions, peer skills, verbal output, etc. will be critical. (Note that CDs benefit from this training as well.) But equally important, the child with ODD must be aided to care about others, and to be guided more by conscience. (Note that CDs almost never benefit from this type of aid, and usually become more out-of-control as they assume the adult has "no clue" if they are using methods that involve utterly foreign and irrelevant concepts like conscience, remorse, guilt, and trust.)

In our workshops, we give dozens of effective interventions for stimulating the conscience of children and teens who evidence ODD. We will supply a
few of the best here. These interventions will only focus on stimulating that conscience or "compensating" for it. If you want more than the handful of ideas given here, or you want to see how to build skills and relationship capacity– those other two key intervention areas for students who evidence ODD– consider signing up for our live or online distance learning workshop, or purchasing some of our books that will deliver hundreds of the solutions you need.


STRATEGIES TO STIMULATE OR SIMULATE THE CONSCIENCE

for Students Who Appear to Have ODD

You can use these methods with or without the diagnosis. Remember that these interventions must be combined with the other key focus areas for students with ODD: skill training and relationship training. Also, remember these methods are not appropriate for use with that other type of very misbehaved youngster, children with conduct disorder.

 

STRATEGY #1

Before a child undertakes a problem behavior, ask the youth to imagine that s/he will read about that act on the cover of the local newspaper
in the morning. Ask the child their reaction. If they say that they wouldn't want to read about it in the newspaper the next morning, then you can say "Then don't do it!" This image makes a fast and easy guide for kids to follow to evaluate whether or not to do questionable behaviors. This intervention is a good choice to use with children whose conscience provides little guidance.

 

STRATEGY #2

This intervention can be used before or after the child has engaged in
misbehavior. For example, let's say the child has stolen the teacher's pen, you can say "I want you to imagine that we're making a video about your life. Are you impressed?" That uncomfortable sensation that the child may have in reaction to this intervention may be the conscience stirring.

 

STRATEGY #3

After the child has engaged in a problem behavior, such as stealing a pen, as in the example above, ask the child, "So what's your integrity worth to you?"

 

STRATEGY #4

To adapt the intervention shown above for young children, simply rephrase the question to "So what's people believing in you, worth to you?" Or, rephrase it to "So what's people trusting you, worth to you?"

 

STRATEGY #5

Have students list problem behaviors, and write their responses in a column on a board. Next, in a second column, have them list the most likely consequences of each behavior. Inform students that they can no longer say "I didn't know what was going to happen next," or make similar disclaimers because they have just shown they can make good guesses to predict the future. This strategy is another substitute for the conscience  as students can "guess ahead" before choosing to engage in problem behaviors.

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Next Generation Classroom Management Tools

 

classroom management blog


Next Generation
Classroom Management Tools

 


workshop trainer Ruth Herman WellsSchool Skills Training can change your life, and the lives of your students.

School Skills Training interventions give you next generation classroom management strategies today. My name is Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I'm the director of Youth Change Workshops, and creator of School Skills Training strategies.

School Skills Training means that you teach your youngsters how to be students, just like you teach your youngsters academic subject matter.

Amazingly, most school districts have carefully crafted, elaborate plans for teaching academic content, but no curriculum at all to teach the foundation School Skills that youngsters need to fully take advantage of academic offerings.

School Skills Training should include teaching students to be motivated, appropriately dressed, how to interact with other students, how to ride the bus, behave in the hallways, and also how to complete assignments, attend every school day, and have acceptable teacher interaction skills.

If you try it, you'll find that teaching kids to be students works much better than just stating the rules and expectations. Without having School Skills, students will struggle to follow the rules and avoid consequences. With School Skills, students are practiced veterans at performing the skills they need for school, and now can achieve their full potential.

 

Next Generation Classroom Management Interventions

You're going to use these creative, unexpected, next generation of classroom management strategies every day you teach


Stop Classroom Management Problems
TEACH MOTIVATION FOR EVERY SUBJECT
Including Reading

Literacy Poster #185If you want students to care about school and the academics you offer, you will have to teach them the value of school– especially if parents are not selling the value of  education for you. Poster #185, pictured here, works both as a poster or a worksheet.

The scrambled text says "This is what life is like if you can't read."

What a provocative, compelling, attention-grabbing way to help your students grasp the minute-by-minute, second-by-second importance of reading to functioning in the world.

To order these full size, color, glossy posters, for $8 each, click here.

 

Stop Classroom Management Problems
TEACH SPECIFIC SKILLS
Including How to Follow the Dress Code


Dress Code Poster #196Stop hassling chronic behavior problems by training your students to have the skills and motivation they need to comply with your school's dress code. Yes, it is possible to stop the unending struggle to get students to dress appropriately for school, especially if you show them how  mastering what to wear to school  prepares them for what to wear in their future jobs of choice.

Poster #196 begins to convince students that if they can't dress appropriately for school, they aren't going to be ready to dress correctly for the adult work place, and the jobs and careers they say they want to succeed in as adults.

To order this poster for $8, click here.

 

Stop Classroom Management Problems
TEACH STUDENTS TO AVOID MISCONDUCT
Including How to Stop Cyberbullying


cyberbullying poster 280When you were being trained to be a teacher, cyberbullying hadn't been invented, so you may feel unprepared to tackle a problem that can happen both in and out of school.

The reality of our world today is that you have to teach every School Skill behavior you want to happen or stop happening in the classroom and school.

This printable can be used to start a discussion, or students can use it as a template to illustrate what is and is not cyberbullying. This printable appears to be a familiar social networking site that is often used for bullying.

Until students are clear on what words, phrases, actions, postings, and text constitute cyberbullying, you are going to struggle to gain compliance. While it's just a first step, helping students become clear on what is and is not cyberbullying is a must-do first step.

Without an education on the topic, it is too easy for youngsters to claim "But I didn't think it was cyberbullying." Take that excuse off the table before students even start to use it this school year.

To order Poster 280, click here.

 

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    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Stop Cyberbullying and Self-Harm: Cyber Smarts for the Facebook Generation

 

classroom management blog

 

Stop Cyberbullying and Self-Harm:
Cyber Smarts
for the Facebook Generation
 


Someday they may call your students the "Facebook Generation." Their
worlds revolve around all things electronic. As a consequence, the
venue for student problems is shifting from the real world to the virtual
one. Unfortunately, virtual world problems can be very much real world
problems too.

Cyberbullying prevention has become a must-do
for most elementary, middle and high school classrooms.

At our workshops, we are getting a lot more requests for
help with students who are facing or engaging in cyberbullying. We
also have been getting a lot of questions about what to do about
students who are literally trashing their own reputations and credibility
by posting damaging pictures and comments about partying, substance
abuse, their interpersonal relationships, and their feelings about their
teachers and bosses. In a time when more and more employers and
colleges are requiring access to applicants' Facebook and My Space
pages, students continue to make themselves unemployable and unlikely
admission candidates when their less-than-sedate lives are splayed all
over the internet– forever.

In this issue, you will be seeing cutting-edge, never-seen-before,
powerful new tools for the Facebook generation. They are designed to
reduce the cyberbullying, and self-harm your students may be involved
in on internet social network sites.

Just like the saying, "What happens in Vegas,
stays in Vegas," "What happens on the internet
stays on the internet," potentially forever.

Help your students avoid being haunted forever
by indiscretions, vulnerabilities, or misbehavior that they
exposed to the world when they where just thirteen or fifteen or
seventeen.

Your students need help with cyber-safety, and fortunately, we have
great cyberbullying prevention strategies for you.

 

Cyberbullying Prevention Methods

 

FACEBOOK
THE ACCIDENTAL RESUME
 

Cyberbullying prevention poster 279Students who post on
Facebook and similar sites
about partying, their intimate
relationship details, substance
abuse, or their dislike for their
employer and job, probably
don't realize that they are
doing great self-harm. Make
sure your students know that
many employers and
university admissions staff are
now requiring access to
students' Facebook and My
Space pages, and they often
ask to review students' blogs.

In fact, there are now sites so cyberbullying poster 280
sophisticated that bosses and
universities don't have to ask.


These rogue sites gather
pictures and text from
supposedly private pages and
blogs. A student may be only
13, but their misdeeds as a young teen may follow them in cyberspace
for the rest of their lives. Youthful errors used to stay in the past, but that will stop with the Facebook generation.

Because the internet is forever, you can refer to Facebook as "the accidental resume."

The intervention pictured above gives you state-of-the-art tools to educate your students before they are harmed in cyberspace. It shows a Facebook page where a student has made negative comments about his/her job, and revealed his substance abuse.

This worksheet/poster brings the cyber world and real world together. Ask students to view this worksheet through the eyes of a boss, school admissions officer, or apartment manager. (Thanks to special ed teacher, Chris Wells for this
truly amazing worksheet.)

View Posters 279 and 280 here.
 

CYBERBULLYING
ANTI-SOCIAL NETWORKING HURTS BULLIES TOO


Bullying prevention poster 97Bullies, be they cyberbullies
or real-world bullies, they're not known
for their empathy.

If you want to change the
bully's behavior, avoid
relationship-based
interventions at all times.
Instead, show the bully
that by hurting others,
he hurts himself.

Bullies will rein in their conduct if they may lose something they want, so show bullies that if their expertise with people is being a good bully, they will have great difficulty keeping jobs, apartments, roommates, friends, etc.

Teach bullies that there is "no way to hurt others without hurting yourself." Be sure that you don't let bullies say they can stop bullying but they choose not to.

Use some of the phrases included on our Poster #097 – shown above, click on it to enlarge it– such as "Bully today, bully tomorrow. Stop now if you can."

To order this bully prevention poster for $8, click here.

 

CYBERBULLYING
IS CYBER CRIME


"But I didn't think it was cyberbullying." That's what
students often say to avoid responsibility for their actions
online. Wipe out that excuse before it happens. Begin by
ensuring that all your students know exactly what constitutes cyberbullying.

 

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    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


How to Help Bullied, Potentially Suicidal Students

 

classroom management blog

 

How to Help Bullied,
Potentially Suicidal Students

 


workshop trainer Ruth Herman WellsIt's been the top story in the news: bullied students committing suicide
because they can't cope with the bullying.

I'm educational workshop instructor Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. with ideas that can help right away.

Even veteran counselors and social workers worry they might not always notice every student who is so distressed that they might engage in serious self-harm, but the reality is that the front line of "first responders" is actually made up of educators, who may not have even have mental health expertise.

Further, many educators may have dozens and dozens of students they see each day. That glimpse into a young person's world may not be enough for a teacher to become aware that a student is in serious emotional distress. Especially as schools increase teacher-student ratios, effectively tracking emotionally fragile students becomes harder and harder for even the most dedicated, aware educator.

Despite the significant obstacles educators face when working with deeply troubled youngsters, none of us ever want to wonder if we did absolutely everything we could to spot and stop bullying, and the staggering consequences that can follow. It is a tough, new job to effectively help bullied students.

This issue of our magazine is designed to help you be as pro-active as possible to prevent a tragedy at your site, but by no means is  this short tutorial comprehensive, so if you suspect safety issues, tell your administrator immediately. In the meantime, you can strive to better equip yourself, your students, and your school to be a place where bullying and ensuing tragedies are less likely to happen. This article is a first step in that effort to help bullied students.

For more help, come to our Seattle or Portland Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop (click).

Bad budget? We've got work-study slots if you need financial aid. Call 800.545.5736 for details.

You can also take the distance learning workshop (click), or schedule us to provide a professional development inservice at your site. We also have free online articles, tutorials, strategies and more throughout our site.
 

New Methods to Help Bullied Students Now
 

EDUCATE VICTIMS
AND POTENTIAL VICTIMS


poster for suicidal studentsA good place to start is by educating vulnerable students on how and when to ask for help from adults.

It may seem obvious to you that a child would seek aid, but to the child the bullying can just seem so overwhelming,
massive, and permanent, that the child can feel there is no useful help out there. The printable poster (Poster 248) makes a good visual that can be an on-going reminder.

The resource can also be used as a worksheet to start off a
discussion of issues like these: "Will adults know how to help? " and "What should you do if you feel so hopeless that you want to hurt yourself?"

Gear the discussion to fit the age of your students, but have the discussion right away. Suicides often seem to engender more suicides, and that is why you need to tackle this safety issue right away.

 

STOP USING INEFFECTIVE APPROACHES TO
CONTROL BULLIES


anti-bullying poster 90If only popularity was the best gauge of a method's
effectiveness. The truth is that many very popular methods that are commonly used to rein in bullies are incredibly ineffective and outdated.

Many bullies are not capable of developing a "normal" conscience and compassion, yet many bullying intervention methods– like character ed– rely on students having those traits, or being able to learn them. If you truly want to become more effective at controlling bullies, you must switch to more up-to-date
interventions that don't require a conscience or compassion in order to have impact.

Here's a few examples of strategies that don't rely on the bully being able to have or rapidly develop compassion. Ask the bully to make a list of all the activities that he wants to do in life, then have the youngster go through the list and cross out all the items that "go well" with bullying. For example, the student may list his desire to be a truck driver. Ask the student to consider if the trucking company boss or the truck dispatcher is going to want to want to take time to deal with a driver who bullies dispatchers, co-workers, customers, or superiors. If the student resists, have the student actually talk to a truck company boss or dispatcher, and ask. If the student says "But I won't bully on the job," challenge the student to prove it by stopping bullying now for
one month. If the student can't or won't stop, ask the student who else will help him learn how to be different by the time he's on the job.

Use the expression "Bully Today. Bully Tomorrow." Notice how all these techniques show the bully that by hurting others, she is hurting herself. It is critical that all the interventions you use with bullies contain that element. Bullies may never care about others, but they almost always care about "Me-Me-Me." Use that to reduce the bullying behavior by convincing the bully "I can't hurt others without hurting me." Our Poster #090 (shown above) is another good example of how the bully will only alter her behavior when she sees it's in her own interest to do so. To order this bully prevention poster for $8, click here.
 

WORK WITH BOTH BULLIES
AND BULLIED STUDENTS

Most schools tend to focus on the bully. While a focus on the bully is certainly essential, since it takes two for the situation to occur, it is as important to work with the victim as it is to work with the bully. If you fail to assist the victim to develop the skills, motivation, and attitude needed to avoid further victimization, you are failing to use half the tools you have available.

To leave all the accountability with the bully– who has a demonstrated record of not being trustworthy or compassionate– is unwise, potentially dangerous, and
inappropriate.

It is always critical that you upgrade the victim's skills to prevent and manage victimization. To not do so could be considered negligent. To upgrade the bullied student's skills, focus on spotting aggression before it starts, what to say or do to avoid victimization, where to go, where to never go, and so on. But the recent student suicides are a reminder that adults have to help victims cope. Learning to cope  emotionally may be as important– perhaps more important– than just learning bullying prevention and survival skills.

Create a worksheet entitled "The Consequences of My Actions." This intervention can be used effectively with both bullies and bullied students. Design the worksheet to have three columns. In Column 1, students list their Behaviors such as bullying or being bullied.

In Column 2 and 3, they list the Money Cost and the Pain Cost of those behaviors.

For bullies, the worksheet captures the consequences of bullying, and how those consequences can be so distasteful that it can make bullying less appealing. For bullied students, this worksheet can show what positive outcome can happen when these youngsters learn and use new skills to actively avoid bullying. This worksheet also shows bullied students how failing to take protective steps can predictably yield poor results.

The hallmark of depression is powerlessness. This worksheet can help bullied students feel that their actions can have impact and power. For bullied students, this worksheet can help convince them to learn and use new skills, while also helping to combat the feelings of powerlessness that lead to depression and potentially, to desperate behaviors.

If you prefer to order this worksheet, purchase our Coping Skills Sampler book here.

 

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    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Extra-Strength Attitude-Adjusters That Inspire and Transform Student Attitudes

 

classroom management blog

 

Extra-Strength
Attitude-Adjusters
That Inspire and Transform Student Attitudes

 

 

Check out these awesome devices to improve even the most negative student's attitude. You don't have to put up with bad student attitudes anymore because we have awesome classroom management devices that will help.
 

STUDENT ATTITUDE ADJUSTER

attitude poster 226"I'd Rather Be in the Bathroom"
 

Doesn't it frustrate you when students spend class time in the
bathroom?

Here is an unexpected way to improve that reality. This technique is so unusual, it may catch students off-balance, and accomplish more than conventional
approaches ever could.

Post this device on the wall, or make your own. It looks a bit
like a sign showing where the bathroom is. Students will be laughing when they read it. While they're laughing, they can't be oppositional so the message on the poster may have impact.

Order Poster #226 here if you'd rather buy it than make your own version of it.

 

STUDENT ATTITUDE ADJUSTER


"I Don't Care About Anything"
 

school poster 237It's so hard to inspire discouraged
students, but what if "The Universe" reached out directly to
turnaround these youngsters? This attention-grabbing intervention can be implemented in many ways, but perhaps the most effective way is to make a card or note that resembles Poster #237, shown at
right, and give it to your discouraged students. You can add personalized text if you wish.

This intervention can also be done verbally, or you could record the message. If you do use a recording, you can add sci-fi sound effects to make this strategy even more humorous and light.

Be sure to keep this activity light and don't let it get upsetting. Check with a mental health counselor for guidance if you aren't sure you can keep it fun, and take no risks using this device with vulnerable, upset, troubled or younger  students.

A good follow-up activity is to ask the student to make a list of all the good things "The Universe" might have in store for them if they were open to the possibilities. To order Poster #237, click here.

 

ATTITUDE ADJUSTER for ADULTS


"This is a Rough Time to Be a Teacher or
Counselor"
 

There is a tiny, little-known winery hidden on the Oregon coast. Inside, there are all the usual amenities one might expect to find in a winery, but instead of attempting to get you to open your wallet to buy wine, the owner attempts to get you to open your wallet to donate to orphaned children in Calcutta.

Where you might expect to see wine lists, you find  inspiration. In today's rough economy, it's understandable
that educators and counselors struggle to stay positive. You will be more effective evoking positive attitudes from your students if you are able to stay positive yourself.

All around the winery, there are pretty paper cards that should advertise the vineyard's newest bottles. Instead the cards feature a poem that the winery owner found on the wall of Mother Theresa's children's home in Calucutta. These inspirational words probably weren't written with teachers and youth workers in mind, but they could have been. An edited excerpt from the poem "Anyway" is below.

ANYWAY

People are unreasonable, illogical and self-centered
LOVE THEM ANYWAY

If you do good, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives
DO GOOD ANYWAY

If you are successful, you win false friends and true enemies
SUCCEED ANYWAY

The good you do may be forgotten tomorrow
DO GOOD ANYWAY

People really need help but may attack you if you help them
HELP PEOPLE ANYWAY

Give the world the best you have and you may get kicked in the teeth
GIVE THE BEST YOU'VE GOT ANYWAY

Adapted from a card published by the Anyway Foundation.

Please consider visiting their site or donating.

 

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
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    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


3 Steps to Better Student Discipline

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

3 Steps to Better Student Discipline

 
 

K-12 Keynote Speaker Ruth Herman Wells

I'm Youth Change Workshops' Director Ruth Herman Wells, M.S.

We continue to get the same questions on discipline again and again at our workshops that are touring the country, and coming soon near you.

In this issue we will give you our best answers. In both our live and online professional development courses, we give you hundreds of strategies that answer "How do I get kids to behave?"

In the meantime, here are some of our best tips and tricks to get you started on improving student discipline in your classroom or group room.

Here is the surprising truth about student discipline: Discipline and consequences are often ineffective.

Yes, every school or agency needs both, but alone, they don't work. Alone? Yes, if you have a discipline and consequence structure set up, but have not first taught your students the skills, motivation and attitudes that they need to perform the desired behaviors, you will almost certainly find your discipline is ineffective.

Children and youth often can not do behaviors that they were never taught. Further, those youngsters who have bad attitudes and no motivation may have no interest in performing to your satisfaction.

Yet, teaching students to have the desired skills, motivation and attitude is almost universally over-looked at most sites. If you want to remedy that oversight, here are the 3 essential elements that must preface or accompany your student discipline and consequences:

 

3 Steps to Better Student Discipline

 

STEP #1
Want Student Discipline? Teach Skills

Years ago, families taught their offspring the basic skills required in school and other settings. Now, many students have never been taught the necessary nuts-and-bolts behaviors that are essential to functioning.

Students may see bad behavior at home and bring it with them to your site. That's why many youth seem to have no sense of acceptable anger control, verbiage, or personal space and distance.

Set up any discipline and consequences you want, but if the child lacks the key skills to comply, discipline can't make much difference.

The list of necessary skills is long, and includes attendance, discussion skills, respect for teachers, respect for peers, punctuality, homework management, hallway behavior, how to sit at a desk, how to use a locker, and on and on and on.

Expecting these skills before teaching them is like expecting snow in summer. It's not very likely. Notice how consequences and discipline can not compensate for missing specific skills like those listed above.


Schedule Your On-Site Workshop Now

While Open Dates Still Remain

Learn 100s of Methods for Work Refusers, Difficult,
Failing, Angry, Unmotivated and Defiant Students

1.800.545.5736 or email

Student Discipline Problems STOP here

 

STEP #2
Want Student Discipline? Teach Motivation

school poster 126If a child believes that your service is unimportant, their behavior is likely to reflect that belief.

Children once learned at home about the value of school or your service. If contemporary students don't learn that at home, and you don't teach it at your site, the child's behavior may reflect their contempt despite any disciplinary efforts.

Poster 126, shown at right, illustrates what we mean when we say "motivate students."

This poster markets math like it was a pair of jeans or an MP3 player. Yes, it is sad to have to do that, but discipline without motivation is like summer without heat: you may wish it was different, but wishing doesn't change anything.

 

STEP #3
Want Student Discipline? Build Positive Attitudes

student discipline poster 37If a child has a negative attitude about your site, that's likely to be reflected in problematic conduct.

Discipline usually can't compel a child to change, but adjusting the child's attitude to be more positive, can create results that by comparison, seem almost magical.

Here is a sample technique: Ask students to write Help Wanted classified ads that start with "Desperately Seeking Someone Mean to Join Our Team."

Discuss the ads that students produce and help students consider if bosses hire and keep surly employees.

Want an example to show students to inspire them to create great ads? Look at Poster 37 at right, and use it as your example.

 

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    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Student Behavior Problems? Here’s Surprising, No-Fail New Strategies

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Student Behavior Problems?
Here's Surprising, No-Fail New Strategies

 
 

K-12 Keynote Speaker Ruth Herman Wells

I'm the instructor for Youth Change's student behavior improvement workshops. My name is Ruth Herman Wells, M.S.

Over the years, I've invented thousands of terrific behavior improvement strategies for students with conduct problems. This is blog issue has a few of my favorites.

 

Student Behavior Management Strategies
 

The Girl in the Mirror

behavior improvement poster 147Have you ever noticed that most interventions are geared for boys, or are generic, one-gender-fits-all interventions?

Poster 147 is intended just for girls, although you can use it with boys if you wish. It's also a great reminder to use gender-proficient interventions when needed. You're student behavior will definitely improve as a result.

This provocative poster is the perfect conversation-starter for girls' counseling groups, health classes, contemporary issues classes, and living skills courses.

It also works well with individual students. It tackles a tough problem area: body image. It also raises issues of weight, self-image, beauty, culture and societal expectations of girls.

This student behavior intervention will start important conversations and provoke insights when mere words and generic methods can't.

 


Schedule Your On-Site Workshop Now

While Open Dates Still Remain

Learn 100s of Methods for Work Refusers, Difficult,
Failing, Angry, Unmotivated and Defiant Students

1.800.545.5736 or email

Classroom Management Problems STOP here

 

I'll Do It Someday

If you had a nickel for every time a youngster told you that they will do what you ask…someday.

This is a light, fun student behavior management intervention.

The next time you hear "someday" in answer to a request to a student, escort the student to your calendar and say: "Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday. Where's Someday?"

Your goal is to teach students that someday doesn't exist.

 

Interventions for Drama Queens– and Kings

You don't work in a theater, but you are surrounded by drama. If you are tired of the theatrics at your school or agency, this very simple behavior intervention can become your new mantra.

Teach your students: "No Extreme Emotions." If you prefer to say it more positively, "Moderate Emotions Only."

If you work with adolescents, it may seem like you are saying "cool it" to a raging fire, but this saying can help. It is uncomfortable for youngsters to be in perpetual chaos, anger, anxiety, or distress.

Market "No Extreme Emotions" as a way out of the constant discomfort. Remember that children and teens don't necessarily realize that their conduct is out of the norm so teach them "Drama only belongs in theaters."

Consider having students make posters that illustrate this caption: More School, Less Drama.
 

The Recession or Depression? Game

There is an old saying about bad economic times: It's a recession when other people lose their jobs. It's a depression when you lose your job.

Teach your students about the terms "recession" and "depression," then help them determine if they are prepared to keep regularly occurring, ordinary recessions from becoming disastrous depressions.

Play the "Recession or Depression?" game. Divide students into two groups then ask each group to determine the truth about what can happen to people during economic downturns.

Reward correct answers by giving students play money. Penalize wrong answers by taking away money, or having the group "go into debt."

The purpose of using the play money is to make the game more concrete and real than you can achieve just using verbiage.

Ask students to determine which of the following facts are true. (All are true.)

-No diploma? You double your chances of
   being unemployed
-Dropouts are the first fired, last hired
-Graduates often send the layoff notices that
   everyone else opens
-Graduates can do and understand more than everyone
   else so they can do better than everyone even when
   the economy does worse
-Jobs that don't require a diploma are disappearing
-In bad economic times, there are more people than jobs
   so grads take the jobs dropouts could otherwise
   have gotten

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    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Fix Classroom Management Problems: Repair Your Broken School Year

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Fix Classroom Management Problems:
Repair Your Broken School Year

 
 

 

K-12 Keynote Speaker Ruth Herman Wells

There was definitely a theme to many of our Fall '07 workshops.

I'm the trainer for the live Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshops, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S.

In our live behavior and classroom management workshops, many of you continued to emphasize that your classroom and school have become seriously out-of-control.

To start off the new year, it only makes sense to give our top tips to repair serious problems at your school or agency.

By the way, for those of you who did attend one of our Fall seminars, we have a new page full of the resources you heard and saw in the workshop. This Past Workshop Participants Only page is just for those of you who have attended the workshop. Reach it by clicking here.

Here are our initial suggestions for what to do to improve problematic classroom management enough to salvage a school year that has been unusually difficult or dangerous.

 

Strategies to Fix

Classroom Management Problems

 

Start Over

Many professionals do not realize that it is always easier to stop the problematic class than to salvage it.

No, you don't have to board up your classroom and hang a "Closed" sign on the door, but understand that it is much harder to fix a broken class than to just start over.

To start over, you can declare the old class as done, and begin fresh in every possible regard. Scrap the rules and make new ones. Rearrange your furniture, develop a new seating plan, and even consider renaming your class. It will also be important to discuss the problems with the class, and to work with your students to make this new venture work better.

However, these initial changes will not be enough. You have to be different and teach differently. It's way past time to understand that "same-old-same-old" methods will not magically start working.

It may be time to realize that you must upgrade your skills and methods for working with out-of-control youth. Some specific suggestions to begin those upgrades are below.

       


Schedule Your On-Site Workshop Now

While Open Dates Still Remain

Learn 100s of Methods for Work Refusers, Difficult,
Failing, Angry, Unmotivated and Defiant Students

1.800.545.5736 or email

Classroom Management Problems STOP here

 

It's Not Just About Relationships Anymore

You may really struggle to manage your most misbehaved students if you use relationship-based approaches with all of them.

While we love relationship-based methods with most students, youngsters are not one-method-fits-all creatures. Relationship-based methods (including character ed, values clarification, trust-building, and praise) will fail with the most unmanageable students, conduct disorders (CDs).

This blog's second and third issues gave you an introduction to conduct disorders. (Click the menu at the top of the page to view those Introductory blog issues.)

Those issues alerted you to avoid most relationship-based and conventional approaches with CDs. If you use just one style of behavior control methods with all your students, you probably have already discovered that "nothing works" to control your class.

Here are some resources that show you methods that will work far better.

If ou want more than just introductory help, click here to get all the information you need on conduct disorders in one place, our Conduct Disorders: All the Best Answers for the Worst Kid Problems book. The bottom line: Until you learn about conduct disorders, regaining control may remain impossible.
 

Become a Fearless Manager

You know the teachers– the ones who can manage almost any class or group.

No one can simply hand you techniques and make you one of those teachers. Even the most updated methods can't hide any fear or worry you may have. Our strategies will help, but they won't alleviate the need to become one of those fearless managers who know that they can manage any class, no matter how difficult.

The truth is that students have amazing radar. They read us adults like open comic books. If part of you is really worried about successfully controlling a group, that fear becomes like neon, and everything else you do is reduced to a whisper.

You need to develop that internal fortitude and certainty that you can manage even the most unmanageable group. To gain that, we suggest watching the true pros of class and group management.

We especially recommend that you find someone with a similar personality and style. Juvenile court and corrections staff, vice-principals, alternative ed teachers, and special ed teachers often provide some of the best models because they have honed their skills with the toughest students.

 

Students Wanted, No Skills Required

Since most schools have no formal curriculum to train kids how to be students, you are expecting students to have skills they may never have been taught.

That's like expecting students to know how to swim even though they've never been taught.

You have to actually teach the school behavior skills that you want students to use in your classroom. Otherwise, you set rules that many students are untrained and unprepared to follow.

You absolutely must teach all the school skills that students need. A few of the most important on a long list include: respect for teachers, how to be part of a class discussion, what words to use, how often to talk out during class, how to get help from teachers, and how to interact with other students.

Be sure you work on students' motivation too. Skill training alone isn't enough. You must convince students that school is incredibly important.

Need dynamic ways to do that? Use the motivational interventions pictured on our posters. You don't have to buy the posters; just read the ideas and use them.

 

Set Behavior Standards and Ensure Compliance

You can not permit the kind of behavior problems that have been occurring at some sites this school year. Some of the participants in our workshops  have described students who are inappropriately touching teachers, openly defying teachers, and entering and leaving classrooms at will.

You can not allow the standards for behavior to slide. There is no way back if you do. Right from the very start, you must have high expectations and compel your students to live up to those standards.

We have heard from teachers who just keep teaching while students refuse to quiet down or pay attention. Imagine the chaos if other compliance-based settings operated in such a manner. For example, would there be any order in a grocery store if the clerk just handed you your groceries after you announce that you'll be taking your groceries but not paying?

You are the "brakes" for out-of-control students. When you don't provide acting-out students with help to stop misbehavior, there is nothing to slow them down.

You must stop instruction and address misconduct. Ideally, you will get to the point where you can prevent disruption before it starts. For now, if you are someone who does need to repair a "broken" school year, be sure to promptly acknowledge and effectively address misbehavior. The longer you wait, the worse it will get.

  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.