Teacher Professional Development Terms Explained by an Expert

 

teacher professional development article

 

Teacher Professional Development
Terms
Explained by an Expert

 
 

 

Teacher professional development requirements are such a hot topic because teachers' careers, salaries and jobs depend on properly completing complex requirements for educator continuing ed.

teacher professional developmentTeachers may be the most over regulated professionals anywhere. I'm teacher professional development speaker Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. My decades of training teachers has made me a bit of an expert on the questions teachers have about meeting continuing ed requirements. I'm going to tackle some of the most common questions here, including the confusion about online classes and webinars.

I always wonder if even surgeons or pilots are subjected to as much scrutiny, debate, discussion, testing, continuing ed requirements and rigorous evaluations as educators. Many teachers have high pressure, more-than-full time jobs, then on their own time, they have to juggle demanding college courses and high-stress tests just to stay employed.

Whether the rigorous requirements for teachers are a good thing or not, so much rides on teachers complying with applicable school, district or state professional development requirements. It is really amazing that given the importance of teacher professional development, so little standardization exists throughout the U.S. That lack of standardization contributes to the confusion about teacher professional development requirements, terminology and options.

Here's some answers to the questions that we hear the most at Youth Change Professional Development Workshops:

Teacher Professional Development Explained

 

teacher professional development ideas and tipsHow do I find out the exact rules I have to follow for the teacher professional development requirements I face?

Your state board of education is a good place to start, as is your teacher standards and practices board. Your union or supervisor may also be able to help. The professional development requirements will vary from state to state, district to district and even school by school. Plus, check for requirements that relate to the academic subject or grade you teach.
 

educator professional development tipCan you explain the difference between CEUs, clock hours, PDUs and college credit?

The abbreviations used to describe Continuing Education Units vary endlessly. CEUs and clock hours can be used interchangeably in most (but not all) places. PDUs means Professional Development Units. Oregon is one state that uses that acronym that means CEUs. Regardless of the abbreviation, CEUs generally mean 1 hour of "seat time," but again, you will find exceptions.

College credit is different from CEUs in many ways. Here are two significant ways that credit and hours differ. First, homework and/or testing are usually required for college graduate credit but not for clock hours. You will find exceptions to that rule of thumb. Clock hours earned online are more likely to require a quick quiz or test, but hours earned in person usually require only that the teacher is present for the instruction.

Second, college credit is usually more valuable and useful for more purposes than hours; but it also tends to cost a lot more. Youth Change's teacher training courses are an exception to that price difference, with both online and in-person professional development classes costing just $45-$55 tuition. Youth Change's clock hours are usually free.

In many or most venues, courses that offer college credit will satisfy the requirement for CEUs, but there will be exceptions.

 

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professional development training tips

Can online professional development classes satisfy teacher continuing education requirements?

If the guidelines allow Distance Learning, Webinars, Online Workshops, Home Study or Self-Guided Classes then you can use virtual classes to satisfy your professional development requirements. There can be limits to how much virtual training you are permitted so the answer may not be as simple as "yes" or "no."

 

teacher professional development ideas and tipsIf I didn't realize that I have to have CEUs or a graduate credit really fast– I mean ASAP– to keep my teaching license, are there many options that exist to help me?

I don't know how many options there are, but yes, organizations like Youth Change Workshops can help right away. Here at Youth Change, we routinely help students who are facing rapidly approaching, critical deadlines for completing a college credit or earning clock hours. We work with student-centered universities that are sensitive to the kind of continuing ed dilemmas teachers can face, and they will be responsive to assisting you to find a fast way to get the documentation you need.

For example, most teachers can quickly use our online course, Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop to satisfy their requirements for either college grad credit or clock hours. In many cases, we have been able to assist teachers to complete their requirements in less than a week. We also help our online teacher professional developmentstudents quickly obtain an official university transcript for graduate credit, or official clock hour completion certificate for continuing education units. Clock hour certificates can be provided immediately upon satisfactory course completion. Learn more about how the  Online Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop can assist you with the grad credit and clock hours that are required for teachers and other disciplines.

 

teacher professional development ideas and tipsI only need 2 or 3 clock hours. Do I have to take a whole long class that is typically 10 hours long?

Generally, you can earn 2 or 3 clock hours by taking shorter courses. For example, Youth Change Workshops offers 1 and 3 hour classes that are easy on your budget and your time. However, there will be significant exceptions. For example, in Washington State, teachers need to earn clock hours sanctioned by OSPI, the state Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Those clocks hours must be funneled through a university or similar entity and most Washington State universities and colleges don't routinely offer an option for earning less than 10 clock hours.

 

teacher professional development ideas and tipsHow do I know if a course will satisfy the specific teacher professional development requirements I have to meet?

Once you know the exact P.D. requirements you face, call us at 1.503.982.4220. You can also email your question to us as well.  If the experts here at Youth Change Workshops don't know the answer to your professional development question, we'll find an expert for you that does. We're here to help teachers, and we're ready to help you.

 

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    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
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An Expert’s Guide How to Select Teacher Professional Development

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

An Expert's Guide
How to Select Teacher Professional Development

 
 

 

We know all about booking the best professional development for your teachers, counselors, special educators or youth professionals. We're the experts at Youth Change Professional Development Workshops and we're going to guide education professional development speakeryou step-by-step through the confusing world of finding excellent staff training or booking a great speaker for your next conference, school inservice day or counseling convention.

My name is Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. and I'll be your guide. I've been a speaker for more than two decades and I'll share what I've learned with you here.

 

1. Identify Your Focus

Too often, we get phone calls from schools, conferences or districts asking for inservice but they are unclear on their focus. Different speakers zero in on distinctly different topic areas so know your focus area before you even begin to look for the right training for your staff.

professional development tipTIP: If you aren't sure exactly what is your most pressing training area, survey your staff and look for repeat requests and priority issues. Priority issues should include safety concerns, student motivation and basic classroom management concerns. If a school or class is unsafe, or if many students are unmotivated or out of control, a focus on academics or other areas will likely be wasted as safety, motivation and well-managed students are essential to everything else that happens at your site.

 

2. Identify the Results You Want

Once you are clear on the focus for your training, you need to figure out exactly what results you are seeking. We hear all the time about school and agency staff sitting through professional development trainings that delivered lots and lots of theory– but the hope had been to get immediately useable techniques. Before you begin your speaker search, make sure you are clear on what you hope to accomplish and whether you are seeking theoretical or practical solutions. Watch out for cookie-cutter workshops that are pre-fabricated and not tailored to your site, your students and your staff's exact needs.

teacher professional development guideTIP: Try to quantify the results you are hoping to achieve. For example, if classroom management is a top issue, you may want results that include a reduction in students referred to the principal for class disruption. Other examples: a reduction in the number of students suspended and improved attendance.

 

 

3. Choose a Delivery Method

In today's world, you have options beyond in-person workshops. While there is no question that in-person is the most effective delivery vehicle for most professional development courses, online training is an option to consider– especially if you are on a tight budget.

professional development tipsDEFINITIONS

Here are the terms to know:

An In-Person Course is provided live either at your site or at a general session hosted by the workshop provider.

General Session Workshops are live and open to anyone. They're sponsored by the course provider. See a sample of a general session workshop.

On-Site Workshops are in-person courses held at your conference, site or at your choice of site for your staff or whoever you decide to include. You can charge others to attend on-site training workshops. You can also use on-site training as a fund raiser by charging others a fee to enroll. View information on on-site training.

An Online Course is a pre-recorded workshop typically offered as a video or in a PowerPoint slide show format. There may or may not be the opportunity for questions or follow-up concerns following an online course. View examples of online courses.

A Webinar is a live course that participants view from their computer or other device as it happens. There may be the chance to interact with the instructor, often by typing questions. Recorded webinars can be later offered as online courses. 

All types of in-person and online workshops can offer college credit and clock hours.

To get a better look at what online workshops are about, look at one of our free mini-professional development online workshops.

 

4. Where to Look for Speakers and Workshops

Now that you know your focus, your goals and the formats that you are willing to consider, you are ready to search for the right speaker and the right workshop for your site.

You can certainly use a search engine to start looking for either live, online or on-site workshops. For example, to find Youth Change Professional Development Workshops, many searchers input "classroom management workshop," "how to motivate unmotivated students workshop," "classroom management speaker" or "school violence expert."

For general sessions and online courses, you just sign up to attend. For on-site training, it's a bit more complicated as you will read further below.

K12 education speakers bureauTo find a speaker or workshop for an on-site presentation, the other major search option is to use a speakers bureau. We love the two bureaus that we work with the most. They move heaven and earth to make sure that conference and inservice planners get everything they hoped for and so much more. We can heartily recommend Premiere Speakers Bureau and AEI Speakers Bureau. Here is what Youth Change Workshops' listing looks like at Premiere Speakers Bureau and at AEI.

Speakers bureaus do all the work for you and get that speaker to you on time no matter what. Sometimes the cost of a workshop or speaker can be the same whether you book directly with the provider or go through a speakers bureau. However, using a bureau can cost more as the bureau does take a portion of the speaker's fee you pay; many speakers raise their fee to cover that extra cost.

There are also Speaker Listing websites that list speakers without representing them. Here is how Youth Change Workshops looks on one of them.

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5. Costs for Speakers and Workshops

Online workshops can be quite affordable. Our online courses start at just $39 and include free clock hours. Tuition for our general session workshops start at $169.

Fees vary wildly for live on-site speakers. Generally, you can expect to pay a premium for any speaker who is a big name in their niche, and the more famous, the more you will spend. However, the size of the fee doesn't guarantee that you get the professional development you want. Speaker fees are not small. Because most speakers travel a long way to your site, expect to spend at least a few thousand dollars, probably more.

Most speakers charge not just a speaking fee but they also bill the host for air and ground travel, per diem and more. Some will also charge for the course workbook and by the number of participants. That can make it hard to calculate your final total to ensure it fits your budget. While this practice is the most common, it is not universal. Fortunately, there are speakers who buck the trend and use a simple flat fee instead.

K12 professional development tipsTIP: Here at Youth Change Workshops, we have always used a flat fee charge for speaking, with one single cost for everything. We don't add any fees for workbooks, participants, college credit or clock hours. The flat fee includes all travel and makes planning easy. Although flat fee is not common, we think it should be because anything that makes it easier on the host is the right way to operate. You may agree and decide to work only with speakers who offer a flat fee option.

 

professional development training tipTIP: Be sure when you compare flat fees with standard fees that you factor in the likely final cost you'll actually pay with the standard fee. Flat fees are financially best for the host because the speaker is covering everything and must absorb any unexpected costs. Compared to flat fees, standard speaking fees usually end up being a less favorable financial outcome for the host who has to pay for many more expenses, cover many more items and absorb unexpected costs.

 

 

6. What to Ask to Find the Right
Professional Development Speaker or Workshop

As noted earlier, the key element is to be sure to ask speaking candidates about their ability to help you reach your quantifiable goals. You should also ask for workshop flyers, course outlines, letters of reference, fee sheet, participant evaluations, press coverage, awards, clips and experience providing training on your topic in your type of setting. Also be sure to ask about the contract and fee payment arrangement. Some speakers require a deposit. Most speakers and speakers bureau only book on a nonrefundable basis. Why? It is hard to re-sell dates at the last moment. Be sure to check what happens if inclement weather, travel disruption or other unexpected event interferes with your professional development event.

 

7. Speaker and On-Site Workshop Contracts

Some speakers and bureaus have lengthy contracts for on-site training events but here are some of the basics that must be included on whatever paperwork you get: Date, times, place, topic, speaker name, fee, fee due date, cancelation/change policy, information on any additional charges, and AV and other setup needs. Nonrefundable, noncancellable dates are the industry standard as last-minute speaker rebooking usually isn't possible, and when it comes down to it, speakers sell dates.

If you will need to use a purchase order or proprietary school district or conference document, find out if the speakers bureau or speaker will accept it.

 

8. Certificates, College Credit and Clock Hours

Your staff may want or need certificates of completion, college credit or professional development hours from the training they attend. Ask if this is an option, and ask about costs. There is huge variation on the costs, from free to quite expensive. Here at Youth Change, we provide most certificates of completion and clock hours free, and our college credit is under $50.

Some professional development providers work with universities that charge a lot for credit. However, as long as the university is a regionally accredited university, the credit will work for degrees, salary increases, etc. Many regionally accredited universities charge very reasonable fees for credit that is just as valuable as that from a most expensive university. For example, we love working with Seattle Pacific University, a widely recognized, regionally accredited university with fantastic customer service for students, yet they charge just $45 per credit.

 

9. Follow-Up

Here at Youth Change, we warranty all our past participants, whether they participate in a live, on-site or online training event. That means we offer Live Expert Help, email help and toll-free phone help indefinitely. We also make it easy for our past participants to repeat our classes should they ever need to. Find out how the workshop provider will support your training participants once the live or online event is over.

 

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    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Classroom Management Problems Solved: Professional Development Solutions At Your Fingertips

 

classroom management blog articles

Classroom Management Problems Solved:

Professional Development Solutions
At Your Fingertips

 

 

education speaker Ruth Herman WellsYouth Change Workshops has been providing training to educators and mental health workers for more than two decades, but some of the classroom management problems we’ve been hearing about lately just seem to be in a league of their own. We’re hearing about students shoving teachers, students refusing to follow staff directions, and we’re hearing about kids who refuse to even wear shirts in the classroom. Fortunately, we know how to help.

I’m Ruth Herman Wells, M.S., the Director and Trainer for Youth Change Workshops. Our classroom management methods were created to target your most defiant, utterly unmanageable students. If you have a few or a lot of students who fit that description, you’ll use every word in this blog article.

Some tips to managing unmanageable students are below, but, even better, for a limited time, we’re letting our subscribers try our new online class, Control the Uncontrollable Student without any charge. This fast professional ezinetag10development seminar will show you how to get back in charge of oppositional students, and how to stay in charge of these challenging youngsters if you’ve been successfully managing them so far. The Control the Uncontrollable Student Online Class (click) is normally $39, but you will get the course with no charge if you take the two easy steps described below.

Get Control Uncontrollable Students Online Class
  FREE!

Take 2 steps by 12-31-12:
(1) Share our site (http://www.youthchg.com) with your co-workers on your website, blog, Facebook page (click), or similar. (2) Click here to email the details of how you shared us, and we’ll send you the link to the online class by return email. It’s that easy.

 

Classroom Management Survival Tips
Controlling Unmanageable Students

Start with Excellent Follow-Through

Even if you want to have warm, friendly bonds with students, you absolutely need to start your school year with tight, firm, consistent classroom management. That means that if you set rules, you enforce those rules. Period. And, yes, that means no “not noticing” infractions that might be difficult to address. Students may be counting on just that reaction. Remember that many acting-out students read us like comic books and know us perhaps better than we know ourselves. Either you start off strong, or you will be stuck trying to fix classroom management problems that are much, much harder to fix than get right the first time. If you start off too tough, students won’t protest when you ease up. If you start off too weak, you’re in for a big battle when you attempt to tighten up.

Different Strokes for Different Folks

No teacher would ever attempt to put all students in a single size of desk, or have all students use a single math book. You are used to tailoring your classroom to meet the specific needs of each child. That approach now needs to be extended to student discipline. One-size-fits-all discipline doesn’t work with seriously misbehaved students. If “nothing” seems to work to rein in your most difficult students, now you know what is going wrong. Read below for more on how to fix it.

 

Test Your Classroom Management Methods Now

Here’s a quick test for you to gauge your classroom management intervention strategies: If you are using relationship-based approaches like character ed and values clarification, for example, you are using inappropriate strategies that are almost certainly doomed to fail. Many of your most out-of-control youngsters are “wired” differently than other students. Recent research into the brain has now confirmed what mental health and juvenile corrections staff have suspected all along: you must switch to interventions that avoid relationship elements. These youngsters will generally behave worse if you don’t. It’s critical that you learn the more effective, specialized techniques required with this type of student. If you want to see methods that have been crafted and tested to work better, the online course, Control the Uncontrollable Student, is offered to you without charge above for a brief time.

 

Get a Mini Skills Upgrade

Here is a list of the most critical do’s and don’ts for working with the toughest students to manage. If you memorize these, and carefully adhere to the list, it’s a place to start. This mini skills upgrade is no substitute for more extensive learning, so more comprehensive professional development options are shown below.

DO: Provide far more than minimum sanctions so students can’t evaluate the risk of consequences for misbehavior. DO: Keep the sanctions very steep to minimize misbehavior. DO: Make sure every interaction with severely acting-out students includes a focus on the one thing they care about most– me-me-me. DO: Be wary of heartfelt apologies and don’t reduce sanctions for tears and “sorrys.” DO: Function as part of a cohesive team. Staff interaction problems result in students playing and winning at Divide and Conquer.

DON’T: Debate or discuss. Just talk then walk instead of being played during prolonged discussions. DON’T: Give second chances. DON’T: Be so predictable. When students can forecast your actions, they arrange their misconduct accordingly, perhaps misbehaving at 10 AM when you normally leave the room momentarily. DON’T: Interact in a mode other than businesslike; heart-to-heart is the path to being played. DON’T: Doubt your ability to manage acting-out students because they can smell uncertainty from afar. Find a boss or mentor to help if you are uncertain. No strategy can compensate for uncertainty.

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    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Classroom Management Help From the Experts on Disruptive Students

 

expert classroom management help

 

Classroom Management Help From the Experts on
Disruptive Students

 
 

 

Classroom management expert helpHello from Youth Change Workshops Director, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. In our last issue, you were offered the chance to name the topic for a future issue. We got many interesting requests. Watch for more issues to focus on these suggestions. For this issue, we have chosen an idea from Theresa G., who is a kindergarten teacher.

Here is part of Theresa's email to us:

"I teach kindergarten and would love to see an issue dealing with constant interruptions…I'm not a new teacher (15 years) but the behaviors I have seen and dealt with the past two to three years are becoming much more common. Out of a class of 16, 8 of them have really horrible behaviors. "

Theresa, we actually covered this problem nearly a year and a half back, probably before you were a subscriber. Here is a replay of that issue plus some brand new methods not included in that earlier issue. Most of these classroom management methods will work with students of all different ages.

Here's the remedy for the constant interruptions: You have to teach the behaviors before you can expect them. This is true whether you have little kids like Theresa, or far bigger ones. Since most schools have no formal, written-down plans to train children to be students, many youngsters act like they have never been trained to be students. This training does not mean restating the expectations. This training does mean that you actually teach the specific skills that you want to see in your classroom or group room. You will have to teach each aspect of the target behavior, just as you must teach all elements of spelling or riding a bike in order to ensure mastery.

help to manage disruptive studentsTo focus on interruptions, you will have to teach all the skills needed for proper class or group participation, including how and when to: walk around, leave the room, chat with others, make silly sounds, send notes, borrow a pencil, and talk out. Until you do teach all those nitty gritty basic skills, you can set whatever standard you want regarding interruptions, however you probably won't get satisfactory compliance. You have to teach the behavior before you expect it.

In this issue, we are going to focus in on just one aspect of interrupting: the mouth. However, please note these next two points:

First, in addition to teaching the skills students need to manage their mouths, please be sure to also use lots of our popular motivation-makers so your youngsters value your site and service. (Find dozens of articles on motivation from our index to all of our educational articles.)

The more your students value your service, the more their behavior will reflect that. Similarly, the less students value your service, the more their behavior will reflect that too. Interruptions certainly may reflect students' low regard for the service you provide.

Second, don't forget to cover all the other skills that youth and children need to act acceptably in your setting. To stay focused on just interruptions, you can't just teach "mouth control" skills, but also must cover how to manage your body, when to arrive, when to exit, how to manage supplies, and so on. Beyond the focus on interruptions, you should cover all the classroom behaviors that you expect.

 

Innovative classroom management strategiesFavorite
Classroom Management Methods to
Help Disruptive Students
 

► Strategy

Give Me Five

This is a fun classroom management intervention for younger students. Have the child give you a "high five" slap while saying: "High Five! 2 ears listening. 2 eyes watching. 1 mouth shut."

 

► Strategy

Do the Wave

This is an incredibly fun intervention that doesn't come alive at all in writing; you simply have to give it a try to appreciate how wonderful it is. This intervention can be used with any age group. Raise your hand, then teach your group to fall silent while rhythmically clapping to this beat: 1-2, 1-2-3 (two slow claps and then three fast.) Most classes quickly learn to instantly transform from rowdy to silent. The effect of the sudden clapping is similar to a crowd doing the wave at a basketball game. Allow students to take turns performing the job of raising a hand to initiate the clapping. You end up with a very quiet room– with no work required on your part to achieve it.

 

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► Strategy

The Mouth Goes Shut

This device is fun with any age group, and it's quick and simple. You simply raise your hand and teach your class: "When the hand goes up, the mouth goes shut." If you wish, a student can perform the raising the hand part of this intervention for you.
 

► Strategy

Dragnet Helps

This device generates instant quiet. Sing the theme of the TV show, Dragnet: dun da-dun dun, dun da-dun dun. Teach students to be quiet in time to sing the last note with you. (The entire tune: dun da-dun dun, dun da-dun dun, dun!)
 

► Strategy

When Everybody Talks, Nobody Can Listen


The preceding interventions can engender quiet. Save this new intervention until you have taught your group how to maintain quiet, perhaps using one of our methods from above. If you have reached that point, tell your group that you have a treat for them. However, to powerfully convey how disruptive interruptions can be, ask all or many of your students to talk at once while you quietly share the location of a treat (such as stickers, popcorn, or whatever would be relished by your group.) Your students will not be able to identify how to access the treat because nothing was accomplished while everyone was talking. Stop the noise then discuss the impact of talk outs. Following the discussion, repeat the initial intervention and re-state the location of the treat. This time, ask the group to maintain quiet while you speak, and time how long it takes your students to access the treat. Help the group to compare the first and second trials as your students enjoy their treats. Ask the group to determine which works better: talking one at a time or everyone talks whenever they wish.


► Strategy

A Talk Thing


This intervention is a great follow-up to the preceding strategy. Now that your students have identified problems with talking out, ask them to develop a plan to fix the problem. Encourage the group to develop a concrete, immediately do-able solution like requiring students to have a "talk thing" in hand prior to speaking. What's a talk thing? It's anything your group wants it to be. It could be a ruler, a cardboard sign, a ball, or any item that the group desires. Whatever the item, the group can require that students possess the talk thing prior to speaking. They can determine the mechanics too. For example, they can put the adult in charge of monitoring and distributing the talk thing, or maybe they will have the person in charge be a student. In a way, it doesn't matter what they decide, because regardless of the configuration that results, your students will have established a way to control talk outs in your group or classroom.

 

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
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Inspirational Apathy-Buster Strategies That Inspire Apathetic Students to Aspire

 

classroom management blog

 

Inspirational
Apathy-Buster Strategies
That Inspire Apathetic Students to Aspire

 

 

If you've got apathetic students, we've got fantastic strategies for them.

workshop trainer Ruth Herman WellsThis is Ruth Herman Wells, M.S., author of many books and posters for apathetic students. We have so many awesome strategies to turnaround apathy, that it's hard to pick just a few favorite interventions for this issue. I hope you enjoy the strategies I've picked out for you and your students.

 

INSPIRE SELF-DESTRUCTIVE STUDENTS

poster for apathetic studentsIt can be tough to inspire students who are "anti-self" but this creative intervention can be a good start. The quote on the worksheet has been attributed to the late Les Paul. It says "The same power you have to destroy yourself, you have to save yourself." You can use this device verbally; it can quickly start a productive discussion. You could also enlarge the worksheet into a poster.

Here is a wonderful alternative activity: Ask your students to research the life of Les Paul, who overcome many challenges to reach great heights as a musician and inventor.

You can order Poster #166 here.


INSPIRE UNMOTIVATED STUDENTS

motivational classroom posterThe little thumbnail picture at left does not adequately capture the special graphic effects on this worksheet. When viewed at full size, the word "DIPLOMA" appears more hidden in the background, creating a bit of a subliminal effect. When students realize that the background also contains the answer to the sentence featured on the poster, they may have an "Aha!" moment that you might not accomplish with a more straightforward approach.

This intervention hinges on the reality that each degree doubles the dollars that students earn. A high school diploma tends to generate about $329,000 more income for graduates compared to dropouts. This handout highlights that in a very memorable fashion.

If you read this worksheet to young students and non-readers, this intervention can work with almost everyone. This device will work best as a worksheet but you can also use the information verbally. If you prefer experiential approaches, use $329,000 in play money to make the activity more vivid.

You can have students use art supplies or computer design programs to make diplomas out of money, or order Poster 168 here.

 

INSPIRE HONESTY

You are going to love this enjoyable, potent activity that can reduce lying. While this device works with almost any age group, it won't be useful to use with the 11-14% of your class that may be conduct disordered. However, this terrific experiential activity can have a lot of impact on the balance of your students.

To conduct this activity, you need lots of big books, or other heavy objects. Dictionaries work really well. Before starting, remind students of the requirement for you to report any disclosures that include safety concerns.

To begin the activity, initiate a discussion of lying. Part way into the discussion, ask for a student to volunteer to help with a demonstration. Select a student who has already revealed a lot of past lies– but be sure to pick a youngster who revealed lies that are not serious, consequential, or personal. Do not select youngsters who reveal lies that are serious, intimate, or personal. Ask that student to briefly re-state the first lie. As they speak, hand them the first big book.

Ask the student to say their second lie, and hand them another book. Continue the process until the student is having great difficulty holding all the books, or until the student drops some books, or the student declines to continue.

Discuss with the class how lies weigh you down until they become impossible to carry. Thanks to special ed teacher, Chris Wells for this creative, fun device.

 

INSPIRE SAD STUDENTS

Students often face struggles that their teachers and counselors can only imagine. Many students don't disclose the nature of their distress, and that makes it very hard to intervene.

Here is a powerful intervention that can help you better understand what your students face. If you have non-writers, you can do the writing portion of this activity as each youngster dictates to you.

Ask students to capture their year as if they were writing a Twitter tweet, which is just 140 characters. Reducing a year to 140 characters may reveal information that could be more readily hidden in conversation. Once you know more about the child's world view, you will have a better idea how to reach and inspire them.

You can adapt this idea to Facebook by asking students to give a several sentence long status update summarizing their year. You may permit some students to use graphics or music instead of just words. Before using this intervention, be sure to remind students that if they reveal abusive situations, that you are required to take protective action.

This intervention is better suited for use by counselors; if you are not a counselor, consult with one before using the device.

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Classroom Management Expert Answers Your Questions About Student Misconduct

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Classroom Management Expert
Answers Your Questions
About Student Misconduct

 
 

 

classroom management speakerOur last issue was so popular, that we listened to the many subscribers who wrote in, and will answer more of your questions again in this issue.

My name is Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I am the Director of Youth Change Professional Development Workshops, and am the workshop presenter you see in our online, on-site and live workshop trainings. If you're looking for a classroom management expert, I may be able to help. I've spent my entire professional career amassing the best, most effective classroom management strategies that exist anywhere.

Just like the participants in our live class, it is clear that our Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver blog subscribers like to set the topics, and get immediate solutions for their most challenging "kid problems."
 

A Classroom Management Expert
Answers Teachers' Questions

 

Q: Maryann is a school counselor in Pemberton, NJ. She requested "strategies to use for children who seek attention by acting out."

A: Maryann, we did a whole issue on this subject about 7 months ago, perhaps before you were a subscriber, so it's too soon to devote a whole issue to this topic, but let me give you a couple favorites.

There is an old saying: "children would rather be praised than punished, but they'd rather be punished than ignored." With that in mind, wait for the acting-out student to be properly behaved, and then offer attention. Although misbehavior compels the adults to give attention, it can start a cycle of misbehavior netting attention, so by acting out, a student can extract notice. That's the exact opposite of what you want to occur so catch your students "doing good" and offer attention then. You are eliminating the need to act out to be noticed. There are even stickers you can buy for younger students that say "Caught doing good."

Class clowns are the classic example of students who chronically act out. Be sure that teachers have their class establish a recommended number of times to talk out, then expect students to follow that standard. Without a quantifiable standard, you are expecting students to adhere to a standard that is unspecified. That isn't fair or reasonable.

For class clowns, work with them to learn about the proper frequency of comments, the correct type of content, and appropriate duration. If you can channel the input to be appropriate, you will give that student lifelong skills to be beloved in the work place for making light, well-timed, often much-needed, humorous comments. You have transformed acting out into a potential, major work place asset. Everyone loves the co-worker who can break up the staff meeting with a well- timed, wry comment or socially acceptable joke.
 

Q: Theresa, who teaches kindergarten, wants more of a focus on younger children. She writes: "I'm not a new teacher (15 years) but, the behaviors I have seen and dealt with the past two to three years are becoming much more common. Out of a class of 16, 8 of them have really horrible behaviors. One even killed a cat this year! Thanks so much…I would love to come to a workshop if you are ever in Wichita, KS."

teacher workshopsA: Thanks for suggesting Wichita, Kansas as the site for one of our conferences. We have held many of our Breakthrough Strategies Conferences in Kansas City, but so far that's as close as we've gotten. You can always ask your school district, professional association, teachers' conference, or local Education Service Center to sponsor a class. It's been a while since one of the Kansas Ed Service Centers hosted us. Or consider taking the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Students distance course online.

Now, if you had taken our Breakthrough Strategies Workshop live or online, or if you have been very carefully reading the articles in our Behavior and Classroom Management Blog, then you would know the answer to this question. Theresa and everybody else: before reading further, stop and consider if you already know the answer to this query, because we have touched on the answer a lot in previous issues of this magazine– and we devote hours to the subject in class.

The most misbehaved children may be "conduct disorders." From past issues or class, you may remember that those words refer to a specific mental health category that describes the most out of control students. (Access those past issues from the index of our educational articles in the right hand column on this page.)

While only a counselor can diagnose conduct disorder, anyone can be concerned that a child falls into this category. Theresa, here is the critical element: you must work completely differently with these students. If you use conventional methods, you will find "nothing works."

For Theresa and others of you with very young students, here's more bad news: the younger the severe misbehavior begins, the worst the outlook. The good news: if more professionals could identify and correctly work with young conduct disorders, the better the chance of aiding that child to avoid that otherwise grim prognosis for the future. Sadly, without targeted intervention, conduct disorders are at high risk of violating the law, and ending up imprisoned. Properly working with that 5 year old conduct disorder today can have incredible impact on his future. That is why Theresa's question is so important.

Anytime you have a young (or older) child doing the most extreme behaviors such as animal abuse, that should be a "red flag" to alert you to consider using the specialized methods that work with conduct disorders. The second and third articles that subscribers to our blog receive, offered you an glimpse into this large population, and Theresa, you use exactly the same type of methods with both older and younger students. You may want to click over to those articles to get a quick update to your skills with this out-of-control student.

classroom strategies bookYou can also consider choosing out our All the Best Answers for the Worst Kid Problems: Conduct Disorders ebook or book. We tell everyone who asks that it is the best $15 you can ever spend to understand how to manage unmanageable students. We promise you that this book is a detailed road map guiding you to manage unmanageable students of all ages. We also have a couple online courses that deliver the same information, but also offer free clock hours to you.


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Q: Here is the email we got from Angela: "My topic suggestion is one that I do not think is addressed enough anywhere– self-mutilation. It is a far more common problem than once thought."

depressed studentA: Angela, you didn't tell us your job, or where you were from, but wherever you are and whatever your job, you are correct. If you are a counselor, you may have noted the increase in the amount of disturbed youngsters, especially in the early grades. The answer we give to your query is going to depend on your job. We are going to play the odds and guess that you are a teacher since we have more teachers as subscribers than counselors. Let's hope we guess right.

If you are not a mental health professional, then whenever you have specific data to suggest active self-harm, you need to immediately notify your administrator or counselor. Only counselors and other mental health workers should be managing behaviors that could be– or become– life threatening.

I am not saying that superficial cutting of the wrist automatically indicates a potential suicide attempt, but ensuring the child's safety must be the job of the mental health worker, and there are no exceptions to that– even if your budget-crunched school lacks a counselor. You will need their guidance, and there is no work-around that is worth risking a child's life.

Even though non-mental health workers must consult a counselor, you still need to understand what makes these children tick, and adapt how you work with them. Plus, other behaviors may really be, or border on self- harm. For example, extreme tattooing or piercings, reckless driving, and serious promiscuity are just a few examples. To understand these youngsters, remember that distressed children don't manage their distress in "appropriate" ways. They don't enter class and say "I feel neglected so I would like additional interaction and nurturance today." They manage their distress in primitive, inappropriate ways like self-mutilation.

For non-counselors, you want to adjust how you work with the child by striking the balance between your mission and the child's distress. That means that when the child is distressed, you may lower the expectations. On days the child is more functional, you increase expectations.

Online teacher classesYou also must consistently observe for safety concerns and let your mental health worker guide you on all else. Even if you lack an on- site counselor, it is not wise to learn counseling by practicing on a distressed youngster. Instead of counseling these students, be nurturing, involved, alert, and available. Offer them time, and listen to what they say– and don't say. Ask them what they need. Sometimes, these youngsters just want someone to notice. But leave the counseling to those trained to do it. Even if you have to move heaven and earth to arrange it, your energy is best spent ensuring that each hurting child has access to a capable counselor who knows exactly how to help. Our online classes (shown here) may offer more methods that can help.

 

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Welcome to the Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog

 

teacher blog


Welcome to the
 

Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog
 

K-12 Educational Articles

 

That Deliver the Best Answers to Turnaround Troubled and Problem Youth

 


workshop trainer Ruth Herman WellsWelcome to your first issue of Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog from Youth Change Workshops.

This blog is packed with articles that deliver dozens of interventions to turnaround problems like poor motivation, cyberbullying, bullying, trauma, bad attitudes, school failure, disrespect, bullying, work refusal, truancy, violence, withdrawal and much more.

My name is Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I am the director of Youth Change Workshops, and an author, trainer, columnist, keynote speaker and adjunct professor.

I created this blog especially for teachers, special educators, principals, social workers, school counselors, psychologists, foster parents, juvenile justice staff, detention workers, and child therapists.

This first issue is an introductory one, to get you acquainted with this blog, as well as our free sample worksheets and other behavior and classroom resource materials sent by postal mail.

This first blog issue also introduces you to our huge web site that is packed with hundreds of interventions and solutions to turnaround problem youth and children.
 

About
The Behavior and Classroom Management Blog

To quickly get some of our best strategies in your hands, if you subscribed to receive issues by email, you'll receive two more issues of our answer-packed blog in the next two weeks.

After that, issues will arrive in your email approximately every 3-4 weeks.

Each new blog issue will always deliver the newest and best strategies for your toughest "kid problems." If you ever have problems receiving or viewing a blog issue, all issues are posted online too.


About
The Sample Worksheets by Mail

student attendance worksheetWhen you subscribed to the Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver blog, you  also requested free written sample intervention materials.

Those free worksheets and resources should arrive soon by postal mail.

In that packet are two lesson worksheets ready to use with your students to turnaround problems like apathy, violence, truancy, school failure, cyberbullying, work refusal and more.

You'll also receive our catalog and workshop flyer.

We're sure that you'll find our behavior and classroom management interventions to be much more powerful and effective than conventional approaches.

 

About
The Web Site

Did you know that there are thousands of behavior and classroom management worksheets, lesson plans and strategies on our web site? If you need help, click Live Help at the bottom of the page, call 1.800.545.5736 or email. We have a huge site for you to explore, with every page devoted to the newest, best, and most powerful behavior and classroom management worksheets, resources and solutions for troubled youth and children.
 

About
Our Workshops, Books, eBooks, & Posters

behavior management book If you would like more than the sampling of strategies posted online and contained in our magazine, sign up for a live or online workshop, order some books or instant download ebooks. We can also bring our workshop to your site or conference.

We hope that the sampling of interventions offered on our site and in our blog will give you a good start on using our powerful, state-of-the-art methods to turnaround your troubled youth and children.

 

 

 

Marvelous Motivation-Making Strategies

Here are a few of our favorite motivation-makers to get you started with some exciting, new behavior and classroom management strategies. You'll get dozens of great, new strategies in each upcoming issue of the blog.


Choose More or Less Money

Ask students which they would rather earn: more or less money than everybody else. When the students say "more", tell them that each degree doubles their pay, noting that high school grads earn roughly twice what dropouts earn.

 

A Motivation-Maker for the Millennium

Jobs available to drop-outs will become less available in the new millennium, plus the jobs that drop-outs can do will decrease about 1/2% in salary each year. College grads should show a 1% annual increase in the new century, and jobs for college and high school grads should increase in number.
 

Five Frightening Financial Facts for Females

1-Females earn just 70% of males
2-No one earns less than a female drop-out
3-To earn the same or more than a male, a female must have a college degree
4- Girls who are teem moms are the most likely to drop out of school than anyone
5- Teen moms are the most likely to live in poverty and go on welfare, and they are the least likely to ever get off welfare

 

But I'll Always…

Have students name jobs they claim they can always do without a diploma, then ask them to imagine how that job could be automated or eliminated. Ask students to determine how many blacksmiths, outhouse builders, stage coach drivers and typewriter makers still exist.

 

Future Help Wanted

For students who say they can always just work at McDonald's, show them this future employment ad, actually expected to be a reality in just 5-10 years: "Fast Food Worker Wanted. Must have excellent computer skills and computer training or college degree. Will run large, automated McDonalds solo and must maintain complex computerized restaurant cooking and delivery system. Excellent salary."

 

A Joke?

Ask your students this question: What do you call a nerd in 5 years? Answer: "Boss."

 

What's a Diploma Worth?

motivational poster #9The next time one of your students says "A diploma is just a piece of paper," you can reply "Yes, a diploma is just a piece of paper…worth $329,000." That's how much more grads earn per lifetime compared to dropouts. This intervention works great using verbiage, but it also works wells as Poster #9.

 

 

 

 

 

Like These Behavior and Classroom Management Interventions?


The behavior and classroom management interventions shown above are from our books and posters, like the resources shown below. Stop using yesterday's methods with today's kids. You'll find working with difficult students doesn't have to be so difficult.

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    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.