The Five Fastest & “Funnest” Student Behavior Management Strategies

 

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The Five Fastest & “Funnest”

Classroom Management Ideas & Strategies

 


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classroom management help

classroom management help

 

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The Five Fastest & “Funnest”

Classroom Management Ideas & Strategies

classroom management ideas

Behavior management and classroom management strategies that utilize humor or fun, get the job done faster as students don’t normally become as reactive or oppositional to lighter, fun approaches. So, please forgive the bad grammar, but below you will find five of our fastest and “funnest” student behavior and classroom management ideas. Hello from Youth Change Workshops’ Director, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I hope you will come to Seattle in two weeks to get 200 additional innovative, more effective classroom management ideas and strategies when we host a general session of our Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop. Information on this information-packed classroom management strategies workshop is here. Register here and get a 30% discount when you use this coupon code: 30% OFF Seattle 2019.

 

classroom management strategies and ideas

#1. Silly Classroom Management Idea
       for Sensitive Topics

fast classroom management strategiesIf you know a topic is loaded with tension and emotion, that’s the perfect time to employ humor. The human brain has trouble holding two conflicting emotions at once so what typically happens is that the student will grin or laugh before the negativity kicks in. That brief moment of understanding the silly sign or poster, puts you one small step closer to perhaps ultimately changing attitudes for the better. Racism is one of the toughest issues to tackle because students may already have entrenched built-in bias from home or their community. That makes a silly approach much smarter than a more straight-forward one. You don’t have to buy Poster #668. Instead of buying it, wait for a time when you need a creative consequence for a creative student. Instead of giving a traditional consequence, have the student make a silly poster similar to Poster #668 that is pictured at right.  If you wish, you can print or display the picture of that poster for use as inspiration for your student.

 

classroom management strategies and ideas

#2. Silly Classroom Management Idea
       Help Students Follow the Rules

fast classroom management helpYou don’t have to spend your entire school year reminding students to follow your classroom and school rules. Here is a very fun and silly classroom management idea that tends to reduce the amount of reminders and sanctions you have to give because your students “didn’t know the rules” or “forgot.” Students will normally learn infinitely faster from an enjoyable game than from another lecture or stern reminder. This game is fun and even better, it provides a fast and effective way to help students remember and follow classroom and schools rules and policies. It’s called Classroom Excuses Bingo. To use this intervention, simply create a bingo card (or cards), and replace the letters and numbers typically found on a Bingo card with the excuses you hear from your students. You may want to have a few fun prizes to the winner of Classroom Excuses Bingo to ramp up involvement and interest to the maximum possible. Alternatively, ask students to design the Classroom Excuses Bingo cards. That task would make a wonderful alternative consequence for any student who has broken a rule or policy. If you want to see an enlarged version of this example Bingo card, click here to view our Poster #543

 

 

classroom management strategies and ideas

#3. Silly Classroom Management Idea
       Build Motivation for School and Education

classroom management ideaIn our workshop that is coming to Seattle in a couple weeks, we will spend hours giving creative, surprising and fun motivational methods for the most unmotivated students. One of our favorites is pictured at right. It looks like a lottery ticket but the text has been redone to make a complete eduction the ultimate prize. You can see this example enlarged; it’s our Poster #496. You can use a picture of Poster #496 as an example for students to make their own lottery tickets that promote education, or, you can discuss the poster as shown. Either way, you are going to be practically “sneaking” your motivational message into your students’ brains. Information presented in silly ways is just so much faster and easier to send and receive. You will see that for yourself once you try some of our silly classroom management ideas with your students. Plus, a side benefit is that it isn’t just more fun for students. Most teachers would much rather teach a silly lesson than have to give another lecture or consequence for some classroom issue.

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classroom management strategies and ideas

#4. Silly Classroom Management Idea
       Address Cultural and Gender Norms

K-12 classroom ideasCultural norms and gender expectations are not normally very easy to rapidly change or improve. Many girls see STEM courses as “too hard” or “not for girls,” but STEM skills are likely to be the most in demand in the future. Lacking those skills will likely be a serious deficit. Possessing those skills will likely be a major asset as STEM careers typically pay more than many of the occupations viewed as “for girls.” This idea is perfect to chip away at the restrictiveness of gender and cultural norms that many girls may follow– probably without even realizing. The image at right is Poster #413. There are at least two ways to use this silly poster to start to change female students’ resistance to STEM classes. First, you can print a picture of the poster and use it as a discussion-starter. A second idea is to ask your students to make their own version of Clamor Magazine. This task can work really well to effect change because to make their creations, girls must be able to identify the restrictiveness of cultural and gender norms and their impact on assumptions and thinking. Having to create something similar to the example poster forces students to think differently than normal. That’s a great first step to help female students move away from some of the cultural or gender norms that may be holding them back from giving STEM classes more of a chance, and a bigger effort.

 

classroom management strategies and ideas

#5. Silly Classroom Management Idea
       Reduce Chronic Peer Problems

classroom management ideaIt’s spring. You know what that means: hormone-poisoned students who are more touchy-feely than you or your school wish. Instead of having to issue frequent reminders about your standards for contact, consider turning your classroom or school into a “No Cuddle Zone” and post appropriate signage. Now you have wall signs doing the heavy lifting 24/7, perhaps freeing you up to do more teaching and less reminding. An example wall sign is shown at right. It is our Poster #121. There is no need to buy the poster, just have one of your creative students whip up a few versions of their own. Creating No Cuddle Zone wall signs will also make a creative consequence for students who use problem contact in your No Cuddle Zone. The signs and the name make it difficult for students to say that they didn’t know that they were not supposed to engage in this type of behavior in school or class. The signs and the name tend to annihilate many of the excuses you hear all the time– and that’s a great result. So, stop battling students’ hormones this spring by employing some fun ideas to help them remember your class and school’s expectations. By incorporating some of these unusual, fun ideas into your classroom, maybe this spring, your students will be better prepared to focus more on the three Rs and less on PDA.

 

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

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Teacher Professional Development Formats: A Fast Reference Guide

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Teacher Professional Development Formats:

A Fast Reference Guide

 


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classroom management help

classroom management help

 

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Teacher Professional Development Course Formats:

A Fast Reference Guide

 

teacher professional development classesIt can be confusing to sign up for teacher professional development classes today because course formats have evolved into a wide array of choices. You may come to find that you can’t fluently speak the new language of professional development. Here at Youth Change Professional Development Workshops, we get lots of questions like “How does an online class work?” and “What’s the difference between a streaming and recorded class?” In this high tech era, professional course delivery options are many, and it can be hard to keep up.

In this quick reference guide, I will run through the most common questions we get and do my best to help you nail down all the terminology so you can make informed professional development course selections. Hi from Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. That’s me in the image at right, as shown in our video Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Online Class. I’m a course presenter, keynote speaker and the Director of Youth Change Professional Development Workshops. I hope our quick manual will be a good guide to staying current with all the terminology that you need to know to take full advantage of today’s ever-changing teacher professional development choices.

 

Professional Development Class Terminology

teacher class management

 

In-Person Professional Development Classes

Think of these courses as analog or legacy professional development classes. This is the old school or old style, conventional method of training. You show up at selected site and hear and see the speaker live. You know this format. Examples of live courses include our professional development classes (click) coming soon to Portland and Seattle. Live courses are interactive and you can usually ask questions and exert some control over the content. On the negative side, you have to get to the event site regardless of weather, traffic or competing demands.

teacher class management

 

Online Professional Development Classes

This term obviously applies to professional development classes delivered via the internet, but the term can include an assortment of formats, all delivered online. When someone uses the term “online class,” they usually mean that the course is a pre-recorded video. Usually, the video will play just like any video you find on the internet, and you can fast forward, stop, rewind and save the video to watch at a later date. But, there are other kinds of online professional development classes. You can see PDFs, audiobooks and ebooks used as online classes. Instead of watching a video, you read an ebook or PDF, or you might listen to an audiobook. “Online class” can also be used to describe another format that varies a bit from video, the Powerpoint presentation. Usually, the Powerpoint presentation is automated and plays like a video. It may even be a video but instead of viewing a class or lecture as you might during a video, you see only or mostly slides that advance on their own. Typically this format does permit you to stop, fast forward, rewind and stop the class, and return to it later.

Not everyone learns well from online professional development. You have to have discipline or motivation to sit hours watching a screen. Most online professional development classes will play on most any internet-connected device but it can be trying to watch a 10 hour course on your little cell phone. These courses are all pre-recorded so you can’t ask questions or control the content of the class at all. There may or may not be a mechanism to reach out to the instructor. On the plus side, you can take classes while you jog on a treadmill or eat breakfast. See examples of our online professional development classes. Online courses are often cheaper than in-person professional development classes but not always. Online courses may or may not hold your interest. It is a lot easier for a presenter to hold your attention when she is live, standing right in front of you versus when she is a not even a half inch tall on your little iPhone.

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Streaming Professional Development Classes

This term seems to confuse people the most. Streaming means that the professional development class is happening live in real time but that it is being delivered online. Typically, you are asked to attend by going to an online meeting website link, often a site like GotoMeeting.com. You may listen and see the professional development course by yourself perhaps using your desktop computer monitor or your phone. Another variation: You might watch on a large monitor as part of a group or staff watching together. Sometimes, you can interact with the presenter, sometimes by phone or by using a microphone. Sometimes you can only interact through a human monitor who relays questions to the instructor, or you might type your questions into your device and that is relayed to the teacher. People can participate from any geographic location all at the same time, or the professional development class can be restricted to members of a school or agency.

Streaming is great because you don’t usually have to go anywhere to attend. The cost can be less than a comparable in-person class, or the class can even be offered free. On the negative side, it can get dull pretty fast. You may find it hard to stay engaged especially if the course is many hours long. It is tough for instructors to project their personalities or a sense of excitement through a screen. If you are sitting at work, you are vulnerable to distractions and interruptions. The course may stream at a time that is not convenient to you. Interacting with the instructor may be slow or difficult. There is always the possibility of technological problems like poor quality video, poor quality sound, lost connections and so on. You can not necessarily save the streamed class, rewind, stop or pause it. You may not be able to return to it. Instructors can generally provide a recorded copy of the completed streaming class, but that is not always done. One real limitation is that you are either watching at the designated time or you miss the course. Learn about our streaming professional development classes.

teacher class management

 

Recorded Streaming Professional Development Classes

As you read above, once the streaming professional development class is over, it is often provided to you as a recorded course. Typically, this means that the once live online course now is a recorded online course. This progression can confuse people. Here is how you can understand it: When you are filming live with your cell phone, that is similar to the class streaming live on the internet. After you finish filming live with your cell phone, you may play back what you just recorded. The recorded streaming professional development class is simply the playback of the live streaming course. Because recorded online streaming classes are fixed, you have all the drawbacks of any online course. Once the streaming stops being live, you may or may not be able to reach the instructor, ask questions or make comments.

teacher class management

 

Other Professional Development Terms to Know

 

Here are a few more terms to be sure you remember:

Self-paced: This just means you can take the class at your own pace. Online classes and recorded streaming courses allow for this if you can stop, pause, and rewind at will. 

eLearning: This umbrella term just means that the course is delivered electronically. That could mean the professional development course is provided online, on a CD or some other electronic method.

Hybrid or Blended Learning: This is a course that uses both electronic and in-person formats, or some other combination of virtual formats. For example, a learner might take an online course then email back and forth with the instructor, or meet with the teacher in person.

Synchronous Learning: This term means that all of the students are taking the professional development class at the same time.

Asynchronous Learning: This term means that not all the students are taking the class at the same time. So, this type of learning results in a single learner interacting directly with the content via a technology system. The learner can go as fast or slow as desired instead of progressing in unison with others or as a part of a group.

Distance Learning: This is another umbrella term that encompasses almost any professional development format that is not sitting in a classroom in person on a set schedule. Online classes and streaming are both types of distance learning, for example.

 

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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Regulators or Educators: Who Should Run K-12?

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

An Open Letter to the Powers That Be

 

Regulators or Educators:

 

Who Should Run K-12?

 
 

 

Dear U.S. Governors and Legislators:

Inservice Presenter Ruth Herman WellsForty years ago, when I was young and beginning my career counseling troubled children and teens, I often found myself  working with gray-haired veteran educators, school administrators and counselors nearing retirement.  Being young and optimistic, I would tell them my ideas for how to fix the K-12 system so it worked better for the growing number of students with challenges. The veteran educators would listen then some of them would tell me how their efforts to reform K-12 education in meaningful ways had failed. They would tell me that they were leaving an education system that functioned no better than when they entered it.

My hair hasn’t yet turned gray, but I am no longer young or optimistic. I spent the last decades wandering North America training teachers and counselors to use updated methods to more effectively teach contemporary students.  As I teach, I sometimes hear myself saying that I too will be leaving an education system that functions no better than when I entered it. If I was more honest, I would not just echo the retiring veterans from forty years ago. If I was more honest, I would admit that I will be leaving an education system that is far worse than when I entered it a lifetime ago.

Everywhere I teach, educators say that they are not only utterly weighed down with more and more students with more and more serious behavioral, social, academic and emotional problems, but they must constantly grapple with high-stakes student testing at the same time they must themselves take elaborate, costly, high-stakes competency tests in order to keep their jobs.

Most of the teachers I meet give their hearts and souls to their students but after staring at them all day while I talk, I have to say that a lot of them look quite worn down and some seem to be wearing out long before retirement. Although they say it politely, the educators I train, confide in me that they wonder if lawmakers who work in a state capitol can know enough about the truth of K-12 schools to properly regulate the system as closely, intensely and extensively as they do. They wonder how well you can see into classrooms when you’re looking from way over in Albany, or up in Sacramento, or from as far away as Washington, D.C.

 

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I wonder too. From your office, can you see what I saw at the school in Cincinnati, where I was asked what teachers should say to students after another yet another young African-American child was shot overnight?

From where you sit, did you know that there have been schools in Texas that have had their requests refused when they asked permission to move high-stakes testing from the morning after the sudden death of one of their students?  

In Portland, Oregon, I was asked what is the right way to handle the middle schooler who wrote on the state-wide essay exam about his triumphant return to school after having to drop out due to family crises and homelessness.The boy had received a failing grade for his effort. Do you know that such incidents are so common they have a special name? They’re called “cry for help” essays, and are written by students who are losing the battle to manage their pain; the sadness just spills out of them.

From where you work each day, can you see Phoenix, where high school teachers asked me what they could do to manage groups of defiant male students who repeatedly refuse to wear shirts in class?

Did you know that in New York, it’s routine in some schools for students to swear at teachers, and even shove and threaten them?

In Atlanta, school counselors asked me about what could they offer teachers when students arrive sleepless because of all-night family domestic violence and substance abuse.

In Kotzebue, Alaska, I was asked for solutions for young students who have no sober caregivers to look after them.

Have you ever tried to enter fortress-like South Carolina schools that following shootings, now have guards and extensive search procedures that exceed those at airports?

Before you created the current testing-centric laws that dominate all things K-12, had you heard about situations like these in school buildings from Alaska to Florida?

For those of you who work in government buildings that aren’t school buildings, are you aware that these incidents are not even a little bit unique? Did you know that this is daily life for many K-12 teachers?

So, here’s a test for you, Mr. and Ms. Legislator, Mr. and Ms. Governor: Unless you knew all about what really happens inside of schools as described above, you just failed your final exam.

If you were not aware of the new realities of K-12 education, you could be micro managing and regulating without having the nuts-and-bolts, insider knowledge, college training, practical experience and expertise that this type of ground-level, up-close and personal daily management requires.

There is one question that I have been asked a lot in the past decade or so. This one query may be the most vivid example of the disconnect between regulators and educators. I am constantly asked by educators “What do I say to students when they want to know why they should even bother trying when our school has been graded and the school itself received a failing grade?”

As someone who has walked through corridors and sat in classrooms from South Florida to inside the Arctic Circle, let me suggest a better central focus than high-stakes student and teacher testing. As someone who has walked with teachers and sat with students, it seems to me that it would make more sense to focus instead on teaching children how to become prepared, motivated students with the needed skills to behave properly, and manage any social, emotional or behavioral concerns.

As someone who spent a lifetime training educators to help challenged students succeed socially, emotionally, behaviorally and academically, I just don’t understand how anyone could effectively manage school houses from state houses. I really believe that if you could see what teachers see from the front of the classroom, you would agree that K-12 education should not revolve around high-stakes testing. If you could see what educators see, you would know that K-12 should be focused on something far more beneficial: evolving to better serve the many troubled, defiant, challenged and violent students who come through the classroom door each morning.

 “There is no more important test of a nation’s place in history than the condition of its children.”  I don’t know if he had high-stakes testing in mind when he spoke, but please consider newscaster Tom Brokaw’s words as a plea for you to reconsider current regulations.

As you work in your government buildings, if you could hear the words being said in school buildings, you would hear teachers saying: “Legislators and Governors, give K-12 control back to educators.”

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Best Student Discipline Strategies From Our 2004 Classroom Management Articles

 

educational articles for teachers

 

Best Student Discipline Strategies

From Our 2004 Classroom Management Articles

 
 

 

teacher educational articlesHello from Ruth Herman Wells, the person that writes all the educational articles here on Youth Change Professional Development Workshops' website. We've piled up a lot of great K-12 educational articles this year and in this article, we'll share some of our best, most effective student discipline and behavior management strategies of all time.

So, here are some exciting new student behavior and classroom management strategies for you to use right now. Enjoy!
 

Best
Discipline, Behavior and Classroom Management Methods
of 2004

 

articles on student discipline1. Famous Last Words

Ask students to imagine "Famous Last Words" from years ago. For example, years ago, someone may have said "People will always need horses for travel," and "Nothing will ever replace the typewriter." List your students' responses on the board and discuss. Next, ask your class members to identify what may be their own "Famous Last Words," and elicit answers like "I'll always be able to find a job without a diploma," and "There is no way I will need computer skills."
 

2. Would You Put Your Future in the Deep Freeze?

This unusual, but compelling intervention requires access to a freezer. Using permanent ink, make up cards that promise rewards or treats to your class members. For example, a card might say "When you see snacks in the room, trade this card for any snack you want," or "When offered, you can use this card to leave class early." Use heavy laminate to encase the cards, then distribute an assortment of cards to students. Students will be enthusiastic and positive about the cards; allow them to voice their pleasure. Next, ask the class members to write their names on the cards they receive, then instruct the students to return all the cards to you. Once you have collected all the cards, submerge the cards in a container of water as your students look on. Next, place the cards in a freezer. You must wait until the cards are frozen in the water to finish this intervention, so plan to continue this exercise in a subsequent class.

To continue the intervention, bring the frozen cards to your next class. Now, do offer snacks, early dismissal, and the other items written on the cards. Students will be unable to locate or use their frozen cards. Let students voice their frustration, then ask the class members to determine the point of this unusual activity. Here is the point: it can be extremely frustrating if you need something and it is in the "deep freeze" when you need it. What might that "something" be? Perhaps a diploma, sobriety, literacy, computer skills, or whatever point you wish it to be for your particular group. Offer students the opportunity to repeat this exercise at the next class using defrosted cards.

Using the defrosted cards, repeat the exercise. Now, students can easily get what they want. Discuss this observation with the class, then ask the class to determine how this observation relates to what can happen if people put their diploma in the deep freeze– or their sobriety, or their literacy, etc.

Our Poster #324 (shown above) is just one of our hundreds of posters that can continually reinforce your message to students that school and education are critically important.


3. How are We Doing?

The new year is a time of new beginnings and reflection. There is no better time than now to ask your students to look at how your class or group is faring. If you don't already ask students to regularly evaluate your class, you may be surprised at the answers. You may shocked at the impact just asking will have on your relationships with your students, who are often quite impressed that you cared enough to ask. Evaluation forms that ask students to finish the sentences, work especially well. For example, questions could include: "The one thing that helps me is…" and "The one thing that does not help me is…" You will learn so much about how to best interact with, and assist your charges. We believe in this intervention so much that we have conducted evaluations on every class we've sponsored in our 15 year history.


4. First In, First Out

Classroom PostersTo improve punctuality, create a rule that offers the first students to arrive, the opportunity to be the first students to leave at the end of your class. You might even allow them to leave several minutes early. This courtesy can be related to the world of employment, where sometimes employees who arrive early, are permitted to leave a bit early, or they may receive promotions, awards, or other benefits for their on-going promptness.

Our Poster #319 (shown at right) can powerfully reinforce your students' new understanding of the importance of punctuality, and can effectively help preserve the improvements you've generated.
 

 

 

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k12 educational articles5. Misbehavior Needed

Ask your class to name all the jobs and businesses where employees can misbehave in the manner that students do. (There are none.) Next, ask your class members if they will ever need to work.
 

6. When the Hand Goes Up…

The first minutes of class or group can be wasted on quieting students. As with any expectation for behavior, you must teach students how to perform the behavior before you expect it. Here is a wonderful device that can engender immediate quiet. Teach your students: "When the hand goes up, the mouth goes shut." To encourage participation, consider asking one of the students to lead the intervention.
 

7. Sounds of Silence

Here is another device to quiet your group quickly. This device is a lot of fun. Using a TV remote control, teach students to become "mute" when you push the button on the remote. Students tend to like this intervention, and will often become mute mid-word, just like a TV would. To make this device work well, be sure to "unmute" your students too. If you wish, this technique can be used throughout class, and at other times.
 

8. Overdue Sue and You

Punctuality can be a chronic problem at your site. Teach students punctuality skills, and you'll find that this chronic problem is less chronic. Ask your class members to imagine the excuses for lateness that might be offered by Overdue Sue, Tardy Marty, and Late Great Nate. Next, ask students to devise specific solutions. Finally, assist students to apply the solutions in their own lives.
 

9. There Must be 2004 Things You Need to Know by 2004

There are some new sounds around in 2004. Ask your students to explain those sounds, and include items like these: Spam filter, portable cell number, terminated benefits, generic equivalent, and land line. (Translation: spam filters attempt to remove junk e-mail; cell phone numbers can now be transferred from carrier to carrier; terminated benefits mean your insurance or other service has ended; generic equivalent drugs may be cheaper counterparts of brand-name drugs; a land line is a non-cellular phone.) Ask students to consider if they can keep up with the conversation in 2004.
 

10. Control the Uncontrollable

We are often asked to present our workshop at schools where the staff feel that the students are out-of-control. During these workshops, staff always want to know how to get back in control, especially when nothing seems to work. Here are the first two steps. First, it is much easier to start over than rehabilitate a class or group that has been out- of-control. A natural time of year to start over is January, which is traditionally viewed as a time of beginnings. If you take this step, be sure to acknowledge the past problems, and emphasize that those problems will not be continuing. You now must absolutely follow through on those words, or the problems will likely worsen.

The immediate question then becomes, "How do I follow through and maintain better control?" The answer is that you must learn and use techniques that fit extremely out-of-control youngsters. This is the second of the two initial steps. For many youth professionals, your training did not help you learn different management techniques for different types of youngsters. Ideally, you would have learned a lot in college about uncontrollable (conduct disordered) youth, and how you must work with them differently. However, many youth professionals aren't given this training.online professional development Your second and third issue of this magazine covered this population, and gave you a few key do's and don'ts. To maintain better control, you must use the correct methods for severely misbehaved students, and you must train and motivate all your students to perform the behaviors that you expect. Need a recap on severely misbehaved youth? Here is initial information to get you started. This introductory article will not be everything that you need, but it will give you some of the key basics to get your started on a better year– even for your most defiant students who are so hard to discipline effectively.

Our online workshops can quickly provide more in-depth understanding of hard-to-discipline students. View our many choices for online professional development. All offer free clock hours, and $45 college credit is also available for some online professional development choices.

 

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