Free Worksheets with Student Behavior Strategies

 

teacher classroom management blog

4 Free Worksheets with

Student Behavior Strategies 
 

 


classroom management help

classroom management help

classroom management help

 

expert classroom management toolsNext Live Workshops:

 

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Seattle

Breakthrough

Strategies

Workshop

Behavior and Budget Problems Stop Here!

Now $119 for 2 Days, $90 for 1 Day
Coupon Code: 30% OFF Seattle 2019 | Valid through 04-17-19
Register  |  Workshop Information

Working with difficult students doesn’t have to be so difficult

What kind of year will it be without our 200 problem-stopping strategies?

 


4 Free Worksheets with
Student Behavior Strategies

behavior strategies workshopYou’re going to love the four free student behavior strategies worksheets included in this edition of the Problem Student Problem-Solver Magazine. Hello from Youth Change Professional Development Workshops Director, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. We’ve loaded this issue with some of our very best behavior strategies for student problems like poor motivation and aggressiveness, and there is even a worksheet for girls who are not very motivated or interested in STEM classes.

These behavior improvement worksheets give you innovative, more effective strategies, and are taken from our in-person Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop, Online Breakthrough Workshop and Breakthrough ebooks and books. Our workshop is scheduled for Seattle in just about a month from now, on April 18-19, 2019. Scholarship work-study slots are still open if you are on a budget. Grab a scholarship by calling 503.982.4220 and in 5 minutes you’ll be signed up to sign away your worst student behavior management problems. The Breakthrough Workshop is designed to give you 200 solutions to make classroom behavior management stop being a battle and start being a success.

SEL social emotional learningMotivational
 Behavior Strategies Worksheet

This motivational behavior strategies worksheet for your students is a clever way to build motivation. Fortunately, more motivated students often translates to improved classroom management. The worksheet is a simple multiple choice that you can use as part of a group discussion or it also works well for use individually with students. Click here to get this behavior strategies handout in PDF format. It’s ready to print and use right away. It’s taken from our Education: Don’t Start the Millennium Without It Book.

 

 

 

STEM motivational worksheetBuild Girls’ Interest in STEM Courses
 Behavior Strategies Worksheet

This unconventional worksheet is so silly and funny, that you will practically sneak information into your students’ brains. Designed specifically for use with girls and young women, this lively worksheet confronts some of the stereotypes that can cause young females to initially feel uninterested in STEM courses. But, STEM courses are hugely important to future career success so it’s critical to break down those barriers and successfully motivate girls to consider giving STEM courses more of a chance. If you prefer to have the poster version of this fun intervention, it’s our very popular Poster #415; click here. To pick up the free PDF behavior strategies worksheet version, click here.

 

 

Article Continues Below

 


 

30% OFF!

Seattle Breakthrough Strategies Workshop

Behavior and Budget Problems Stop Here!

 

Now $119 for 2 Days, $90 for 1 Day

Coupon Code: 30% OFF Seattle 2019

Valid through 04-17-19

Register   Workshop Information

 


 

 

 

classroom management workshops

Schedule
Your On-Site
Inservice Workshop Now

It’s More Affordable Than You Think

Learn 100s of Strategies for Work Refusers, Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated and Withdrawn Students

1.800.545.5736 or Email

One Click Can Solve It All

 

 

Article Continues Here

behavior strategiesReduce Aggressiveness
 Behavior Strategies Worksheet

Here are some lively, creative behavior strategies to help improve your classroom management results. You can help students improve their demeanor and conduct with specific training techniques like this sample strategy. Obviously, this one behavior strategy worksheet can’t instantly change students but using lots of interventions like this will make a big difference over time. You don’t have to just live with students’ bad behavior when you regularly use behavior strategies like this example. This worksheet is intended for use with groups so you can help students understand how others see their behavior vs. their own self-perception. Many aggressive youngsters don’t realize the serious impact of their conduct on others. Gaining this insight can help some students to become more willing to work on behavior improvement. This behavior improvement strategies worksheet is from our Temper and Tantrum Tamers lesson book that is offered in both ebook and book format. To pick up the free student aggressiveness management worksheet, click here.

 

behavior strategies for temper tantrumsReduce Temper Tantrums
 Behavior Strategies Worksheet

If you have ever tried to get a student to accept help to stop aggressiveness, violence or temper tantrums, you know that many youngsters have little interest in changing. This worksheet is designed to start the process of students reconsidering their resistance by helping them realize that their acting-out will be a lifelong impediment and a huge obstacle to many of the things they may want to do throughout life. By helping students gain motivation to change, change is more likely to occur. This single intervention lesson will not be sufficient to engender change but it makes a great first step. If you keep using intervention strategies like those in this handout, you may actually begin to see improvement in behavior over time. Changing problem behavior is always going to work better than relying on consequences alone because consequences aren’t very good at compensating for missing self-control skills. That’s why behavior worksheets like this sample can generate far superior results than sanctions alone. This worksheet is from our popular Temper and Tantrum Tamer book or ebook. Pick up this ready-to-use temper tantrum improvement worksheet here.

 

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    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


What Works with Students Who Avoid or Refuse to Work

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

What Works with Students

Who Avoid or Refuse to Work

 

 


classroom management help

classroom management help

classroom management help

 

expert classroom management toolsNext Live Workshops:

 

30% OFF!

Seattle

Breakthrough

Strategies

Workshop

Behavior and Budget Problems Stop Here!

Now $119 for 2 Days, $90 for 1 Day
Coupon Code: 30% OFF Seattle 2019 | Valid through 04-17-19
Register  |  Workshop Information

Working with difficult students doesn’t have to be so difficult

What kind of year will it be without our 200 problem-stopping strategies?

 


What Works with Students

 

Who Avoid or Refuse to Work

 

work refusal articleThey are without a doubt among the hardest students to reach and teach. I’m talking about students who avoid school tasks or refuse to work entirely. Some may become almost mute, others won’t even make eye contact, but the common thread is that the student is drastically underperforming when it comes to accepting, completing and returning assignments. If you’re like most teachers, you never had a class in college called Introduction to Helping Students Who Avoid Work, but you probably wish there had been lots of courses exactly like that. You don’t have to go back to college. Help is right here in this how-to article.

If you want even more strategies and information that can produce improved results from students who avoid or refuse school work, come to our Seattle Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop on April 18-19, 2019 and get hours of detailed, step-by-step instruction on how to maximize your impact on these difficult to teach students. Hello from the course instructor, Youth Change Professional Development Workshops director, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. That’s a picture of me teaching in Seattle a couple years ago. I hope to see you back there in April when you can actually list out for me the student problems you want me to cover. You’ll leave with 200 use-now, more effective strategies.

 

Innovative Strategies for Students

 

Who Avoid or Refuse to Work

students who don't finish their work

 

Stop the Power Struggle

Most teachers know that is very easy to end up in a power struggle with students who don’t do much school work or none at all. As a mental health professional, I really need to point out that no adult ever won a power struggle and not adult ever will. So, if you have to admit that you do feel a bit like you are in a power struggle with some of your work refusing students, Step #1 has to be to acknowledge that to the youngster, declare a truce and back off for a moment.

Here’s why many or most students refuse work: Much of the time, these children and teens are terribly weighed down by some type of problem. Perhaps a parent is violent or missing. Perhaps they have an undiagnosed or diagnosed learning disorder that makes school work miserable. Maybe they are distracted or unmotivated. In this short article, we’ll focus on the first students mentioned above, the ones that are struggling with some type of emotional, social or learning problem. There are dozens of  free expert, how-to articles our site covering poor motivation that you can read. Building motivation in work refusing students can be a good help but if a student is too busy trying to stay awake after all-night domestic violence, motivation is only going to take you so far. Instead, being sensitive to what the child may be living through, may be a much more effective approach. Remember: You may be the only sane, sober adult in some students’ orbit. You definitely don’t want to add burdens. You want to be on their side as much as you can. Stopping any power struggles and explicitly talking about how to manage the work refusal is a great place to begin again.

students who don't finish their work

 

Ask the Expert

Who you think just might be the best expert to help you figure out how to best work with a student who is avoiding or refusing to work? That student. No one else may know why they are doing so little, so ask then listen carefully to the response you get when you ask for the reason for not wanting to start or complete tasks. If the student answers that they don’t know why, then ask “If you did know why, what might it be?” If that unexpected strategy fails, switch the focus to a friend or someone in popular culture and ask the student why that person might refuse to work. That switch may yield important clues and by shifting the focus to someone else, you may get more truth than the student would tell you otherwise.

Whether or not you succeed at getting more information, use the students’ expertise to improve the situation. Ask the student to help you understand what to do and what not to do to assist them. Tell the student you are on their side and don’t want to add to any problems they may already have. Tell the student that with their guidance, perhaps they could do less work on days they are struggling and more work on days they feel more able. Next, cooperatively develop a step by step plan that features tiny, tiny increases. If you aim for bigger increases, that creates the possibility of a big setback if the student fails. If the increase is tiny, and the student is saying that’s “too easy,” that’s perfect. You want the student to have some small successes but without the risk of a big fail. When this youngster fails, they often disappear from school or lose a lot of ground in other areas. This student is all about anxiety. Everything you do must decrease the anxiety because when the student experiences anxiety, that’s when they refuse work or disappear from school or class.

students who don't finish their work

 

It’s About Control

Typically, students who refuse to work are very anxious. They are struggling to cope. When they refuse to work, they are trying to take control over one of the few things in their world that they have any say over at all. You can struggle with them over the control but that is never going to go well. Instead, hand the control to them and you will see improved results. I suggest explicitly talking about control and anxiety with them, and reassuring them that you don’t want to add to their worries. Tell them you want to give them as much control over their work as possible. That can help them be a little less anxious. Their anxiety is the best guide. When it is high, reduce expectations. When it is relatively low, incrementally increase expectations for work. Let them know that you will give them slack when they are struggling, but in return, ask if they could work as hard as they can on days that they are feeling a bit better.

Be sure that these youngsters understand that they are going to need the skills taught in school, and if you two work together, they can accomplish that in a way that doesn’t put any strain on them. Once you are both on the same side, a general relaxation can occur and improvement can happen– but only to a certain extent. For example, students who are awake much of the night because their home is a battleground, will be limited in how much they will be able to do with little sleep and lots of worries.

Article Continues Below

 


 

30% OFF!

Seattle Breakthrough Strategies Workshop

Behavior and Budget Problems Stop Here!

 

Now $119 for 2 Days, $90 for 1 Day

Coupon Code: 30% OFF Seattle 2019

Valid through 04-17-19

Register   Workshop Information

 


 

 

 

classroom management workshops

Schedule
Your On-Site
Inservice Workshop Now

It’s More Affordable Than You Think

Learn 100s of Strategies for
Students Who Refuse Work, Are Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated or Withdrawn

1.800.545.5736 or Email

One Click Can Solve It All

 

 

Article Continues Here

students who don't finish their work

 

To Push or Not to Push?

Do I push students who do nothing in school, or do I back off? That’s the million dollar question, isn’t it? You may feel that when it comes to students who refuse to work or avoid assignments, it’s lose-lose. If you push, these students tend to double down on their resistance. Many stop showing up for school or class. If you don’t push, then the fear is that you are not educating these youngsters at all. Here’s the solution to this mystery: Both pushing and not pushing result in big fails. “To push or not to push” isn’t even the right question. The better question is “What should I do to get more results from these youngsters? In our workshops, we spend hours answering this question. In this brief how-to article, I can’t fit in the wealth of techniques I’ll be giving in Seattle in April in our Breakthrough Strategies Workshop, but here’s a few key pro tips:

As a mental health professional, I can assure you that typically many students who routinely and seriously refuse or avoid work, are facing some type of emotional, social or behavioral issue that impedes their functioning. Even so, despite the significant (but often not readily apparent or visible) challenges these students may have, most of these youngsters usually have days that are better or worse. On days that this student is struggling, reduce your expectations. On days that this student appears to be doing a bit better, increase your expectations. For example, a girl’s dad is on the road driving a long haul truck 4 days a week. You may notice her functioning is markedly improved when dad is on the road. You may notice the girl’s functioning nose dives when dad returns. That’s the time to cut her slack. Make specific agreements with students that reflect this type of plan.

Students tend to be really grateful to know that you are not going to cause more burdens to be added to their shoulders at times they are already carrying a very heavy load. The upshot is that now that there is no more power struggling over classroom work, and the student realizes that you understand their situation, they tend to work as hard as they can on the days they are able. They also tend to develop a lot of loyalty for you and that helps fuel their desire to work when they aren’t weighed down by whatever they may be going through. As an aside, I have to be sure to remind you to be sure to report any concrete indications of abuse or similar, as you are required by your site.

students who don't finish their work

 

Your Goal

The goal for students who refuse to work can and should be shared with these youngsters. That means you will be sensitive to what trauma, crisis, disability, emotional problem or plight the child is dealing with, but not at the expense of education. There is a balance between being sensitive to what the child may be living through and your mission to educate. If you can find that middle ground between those two parameters, you can really maximize the results these students can achieve.

No, you don’t need to worry about these children taking advantage of you if you are using this methods with students who have a lot of anxiety. That is key. These methods will fail with other populations of students. These intervention methods are designed only for use with students who are anxious or struggling with problems like trauma, domestic violence or loss. Dealing with the anxiety and whatever is causing it, takes so most of this students’ energy and resources. They don’t have much energy or interest left to plot and scheme how to take advantage of your reasonableness and kindness so being manipulated while using these methods is not normally a concern with the target population. Yes, manipulation would occur if you employ these strategies with populations they were not intended for.

If you are using this method with truly anxious and troubled students, they are much more likely to develop enormous loyalty towards you versus expend energy to exploit the accommodations you provide. You may be the only kind, humane adult they interact with. They are unlikely to jeopardize their lifeline. That’s why the best goal is to help them learn to work as hard as they can on days that they’re able. Hearing about that goal can reduce the power struggles and bring relief to children who are awash in pain.

 

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  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


An Expert’s Guide How to Select Teacher Professional Development

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

An Expert's Guide
How to Select Teacher Professional Development

 
 

 

We know all about booking the best professional development for your teachers, counselors, special educators or youth professionals. We're the experts at Youth Change Professional Development Workshops and we're going to guide education professional development speakeryou step-by-step through the confusing world of finding excellent staff training or booking a great speaker for your next conference, school inservice day or counseling convention.

My name is Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. and I'll be your guide. I've been a speaker for more than two decades and I'll share what I've learned with you here.

 

1. Identify Your Focus

Too often, we get phone calls from schools, conferences or districts asking for inservice but they are unclear on their focus. Different speakers zero in on distinctly different topic areas so know your focus area before you even begin to look for the right training for your staff.

professional development tipTIP: If you aren't sure exactly what is your most pressing training area, survey your staff and look for repeat requests and priority issues. Priority issues should include safety concerns, student motivation and basic classroom management concerns. If a school or class is unsafe, or if many students are unmotivated or out of control, a focus on academics or other areas will likely be wasted as safety, motivation and well-managed students are essential to everything else that happens at your site.

 

2. Identify the Results You Want

Once you are clear on the focus for your training, you need to figure out exactly what results you are seeking. We hear all the time about school and agency staff sitting through professional development trainings that delivered lots and lots of theory– but the hope had been to get immediately useable techniques. Before you begin your speaker search, make sure you are clear on what you hope to accomplish and whether you are seeking theoretical or practical solutions. Watch out for cookie-cutter workshops that are pre-fabricated and not tailored to your site, your students and your staff's exact needs.

teacher professional development guideTIP: Try to quantify the results you are hoping to achieve. For example, if classroom management is a top issue, you may want results that include a reduction in students referred to the principal for class disruption. Other examples: a reduction in the number of students suspended and improved attendance.

 

 

3. Choose a Delivery Method

In today's world, you have options beyond in-person workshops. While there is no question that in-person is the most effective delivery vehicle for most professional development courses, online training is an option to consider– especially if you are on a tight budget.

professional development tipsDEFINITIONS

Here are the terms to know:

An In-Person Course is provided live either at your site or at a general session hosted by the workshop provider.

General Session Workshops are live and open to anyone. They're sponsored by the course provider. See a sample of a general session workshop.

On-Site Workshops are in-person courses held at your conference, site or at your choice of site for your staff or whoever you decide to include. You can charge others to attend on-site training workshops. You can also use on-site training as a fund raiser by charging others a fee to enroll. View information on on-site training.

An Online Course is a pre-recorded workshop typically offered as a video or in a PowerPoint slide show format. There may or may not be the opportunity for questions or follow-up concerns following an online course. View examples of online courses.

A Webinar is a live course that participants view from their computer or other device as it happens. There may be the chance to interact with the instructor, often by typing questions. Recorded webinars can be later offered as online courses. 

All types of in-person and online workshops can offer college credit and clock hours.

To get a better look at what online workshops are about, look at one of our free mini-professional development online workshops.

 

4. Where to Look for Speakers and Workshops

Now that you know your focus, your goals and the formats that you are willing to consider, you are ready to search for the right speaker and the right workshop for your site.

You can certainly use a search engine to start looking for either live, online or on-site workshops. For example, to find Youth Change Professional Development Workshops, many searchers input "classroom management workshop," "how to motivate unmotivated students workshop," "classroom management speaker" or "school violence expert."

For general sessions and online courses, you just sign up to attend. For on-site training, it's a bit more complicated as you will read further below.

K12 education speakers bureauTo find a speaker or workshop for an on-site presentation, the other major search option is to use a speakers bureau. We love the two bureaus that we work with the most. They move heaven and earth to make sure that conference and inservice planners get everything they hoped for and so much more. We can heartily recommend Premiere Speakers Bureau and AEI Speakers Bureau. Here is what Youth Change Workshops' listing looks like at Premiere Speakers Bureau and at AEI.

Speakers bureaus do all the work for you and get that speaker to you on time no matter what. Sometimes the cost of a workshop or speaker can be the same whether you book directly with the provider or go through a speakers bureau. However, using a bureau can cost more as the bureau does take a portion of the speaker's fee you pay; many speakers raise their fee to cover that extra cost.

There are also Speaker Listing websites that list speakers without representing them. Here is how Youth Change Workshops looks on one of them.

Article Continues Below

 

teacher workshop

 

Schedule Your On-Site Inservice Workshop Now

It's More Affordable Than You Think

Learn 100s of Strategies for Work Refusers, Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated and Withdrawn Students

1.800.545.5736 or Email

One Click Can Solve It All

 

 

Article Continues Here

 

5. Costs for Speakers and Workshops

Online workshops can be quite affordable. Our online courses start at just $39 and include free clock hours. Tuition for our general session workshops start at $169.

Fees vary wildly for live on-site speakers. Generally, you can expect to pay a premium for any speaker who is a big name in their niche, and the more famous, the more you will spend. However, the size of the fee doesn't guarantee that you get the professional development you want. Speaker fees are not small. Because most speakers travel a long way to your site, expect to spend at least a few thousand dollars, probably more.

Most speakers charge not just a speaking fee but they also bill the host for air and ground travel, per diem and more. Some will also charge for the course workbook and by the number of participants. That can make it hard to calculate your final total to ensure it fits your budget. While this practice is the most common, it is not universal. Fortunately, there are speakers who buck the trend and use a simple flat fee instead.

K12 professional development tipsTIP: Here at Youth Change Workshops, we have always used a flat fee charge for speaking, with one single cost for everything. We don't add any fees for workbooks, participants, college credit or clock hours. The flat fee includes all travel and makes planning easy. Although flat fee is not common, we think it should be because anything that makes it easier on the host is the right way to operate. You may agree and decide to work only with speakers who offer a flat fee option.

 

professional development training tipTIP: Be sure when you compare flat fees with standard fees that you factor in the likely final cost you'll actually pay with the standard fee. Flat fees are financially best for the host because the speaker is covering everything and must absorb any unexpected costs. Compared to flat fees, standard speaking fees usually end up being a less favorable financial outcome for the host who has to pay for many more expenses, cover many more items and absorb unexpected costs.

 

 

6. What to Ask to Find the Right
Professional Development Speaker or Workshop

As noted earlier, the key element is to be sure to ask speaking candidates about their ability to help you reach your quantifiable goals. You should also ask for workshop flyers, course outlines, letters of reference, fee sheet, participant evaluations, press coverage, awards, clips and experience providing training on your topic in your type of setting. Also be sure to ask about the contract and fee payment arrangement. Some speakers require a deposit. Most speakers and speakers bureau only book on a nonrefundable basis. Why? It is hard to re-sell dates at the last moment. Be sure to check what happens if inclement weather, travel disruption or other unexpected event interferes with your professional development event.

 

7. Speaker and On-Site Workshop Contracts

Some speakers and bureaus have lengthy contracts for on-site training events but here are some of the basics that must be included on whatever paperwork you get: Date, times, place, topic, speaker name, fee, fee due date, cancelation/change policy, information on any additional charges, and AV and other setup needs. Nonrefundable, noncancellable dates are the industry standard as last-minute speaker rebooking usually isn't possible, and when it comes down to it, speakers sell dates.

If you will need to use a purchase order or proprietary school district or conference document, find out if the speakers bureau or speaker will accept it.

 

8. Certificates, College Credit and Clock Hours

Your staff may want or need certificates of completion, college credit or professional development hours from the training they attend. Ask if this is an option, and ask about costs. There is huge variation on the costs, from free to quite expensive. Here at Youth Change, we provide most certificates of completion and clock hours free, and our college credit is under $50.

Some professional development providers work with universities that charge a lot for credit. However, as long as the university is a regionally accredited university, the credit will work for degrees, salary increases, etc. Many regionally accredited universities charge very reasonable fees for credit that is just as valuable as that from a most expensive university. For example, we love working with Seattle Pacific University, a widely recognized, regionally accredited university with fantastic customer service for students, yet they charge just $45 per credit.

 

9. Follow-Up

Here at Youth Change, we warranty all our past participants, whether they participate in a live, on-site or online training event. That means we offer Live Expert Help, email help and toll-free phone help indefinitely. We also make it easy for our past participants to repeat our classes should they ever need to. Find out how the workshop provider will support your training participants once the live or online event is over.

 

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  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Regulators or Educators: Who Should Run K-12?

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

An Open Letter to the Powers That Be

 

Regulators or Educators:

 

Who Should Run K-12?

 
 

 

Dear U.S. Governors and Legislators:

Inservice Presenter Ruth Herman WellsForty years ago, when I was young and beginning my career counseling troubled children and teens, I often found myself  working with gray-haired veteran educators, school administrators and counselors nearing retirement.  Being young and optimistic, I would tell them my ideas for how to fix the K-12 system so it worked better for the growing number of students with challenges. The veteran educators would listen then some of them would tell me how their efforts to reform K-12 education in meaningful ways had failed. They would tell me that they were leaving an education system that functioned no better than when they entered it.

My hair hasn’t yet turned gray, but I am no longer young or optimistic. I spent the last decades wandering North America training teachers and counselors to use updated methods to more effectively teach contemporary students.  As I teach, I sometimes hear myself saying that I too will be leaving an education system that functions no better than when I entered it. If I was more honest, I would not just echo the retiring veterans from forty years ago. If I was more honest, I would admit that I will be leaving an education system that is far worse than when I entered it a lifetime ago.

Everywhere I teach, educators say that they are not only utterly weighed down with more and more students with more and more serious behavioral, social, academic and emotional problems, but they must constantly grapple with high-stakes student testing at the same time they must themselves take elaborate, costly, high-stakes competency tests in order to keep their jobs.

Most of the teachers I meet give their hearts and souls to their students but after staring at them all day while I talk, I have to say that a lot of them look quite worn down and some seem to be wearing out long before retirement. Although they say it politely, the educators I train, confide in me that they wonder if lawmakers who work in a state capitol can know enough about the truth of K-12 schools to properly regulate the system as closely, intensely and extensively as they do. They wonder how well you can see into classrooms when you’re looking from way over in Albany, or up in Sacramento, or from as far away as Washington, D.C.

 

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I wonder too. From your office, can you see what I saw at the school in Cincinnati, where I was asked what teachers should say to students after another yet another young African-American child was shot overnight?

From where you sit, did you know that there have been schools in Texas that have had their requests refused when they asked permission to move high-stakes testing from the morning after the sudden death of one of their students?  

In Portland, Oregon, I was asked what is the right way to handle the middle schooler who wrote on the state-wide essay exam about his triumphant return to school after having to drop out due to family crises and homelessness.The boy had received a failing grade for his effort. Do you know that such incidents are so common they have a special name? They’re called “cry for help” essays, and are written by students who are losing the battle to manage their pain; the sadness just spills out of them.

From where you work each day, can you see Phoenix, where high school teachers asked me what they could do to manage groups of defiant male students who repeatedly refuse to wear shirts in class?

Did you know that in New York, it’s routine in some schools for students to swear at teachers, and even shove and threaten them?

In Atlanta, school counselors asked me about what could they offer teachers when students arrive sleepless because of all-night family domestic violence and substance abuse.

In Kotzebue, Alaska, I was asked for solutions for young students who have no sober caregivers to look after them.

Have you ever tried to enter fortress-like South Carolina schools that following shootings, now have guards and extensive search procedures that exceed those at airports?

Before you created the current testing-centric laws that dominate all things K-12, had you heard about situations like these in school buildings from Alaska to Florida?

For those of you who work in government buildings that aren’t school buildings, are you aware that these incidents are not even a little bit unique? Did you know that this is daily life for many K-12 teachers?

So, here’s a test for you, Mr. and Ms. Legislator, Mr. and Ms. Governor: Unless you knew all about what really happens inside of schools as described above, you just failed your final exam.

If you were not aware of the new realities of K-12 education, you could be micro managing and regulating without having the nuts-and-bolts, insider knowledge, college training, practical experience and expertise that this type of ground-level, up-close and personal daily management requires.

There is one question that I have been asked a lot in the past decade or so. This one query may be the most vivid example of the disconnect between regulators and educators. I am constantly asked by educators “What do I say to students when they want to know why they should even bother trying when our school has been graded and the school itself received a failing grade?”

As someone who has walked through corridors and sat in classrooms from South Florida to inside the Arctic Circle, let me suggest a better central focus than high-stakes student and teacher testing. As someone who has walked with teachers and sat with students, it seems to me that it would make more sense to focus instead on teaching children how to become prepared, motivated students with the needed skills to behave properly, and manage any social, emotional or behavioral concerns.

As someone who spent a lifetime training educators to help challenged students succeed socially, emotionally, behaviorally and academically, I just don’t understand how anyone could effectively manage school houses from state houses. I really believe that if you could see what teachers see from the front of the classroom, you would agree that K-12 education should not revolve around high-stakes testing. If you could see what educators see, you would know that K-12 should be focused on something far more beneficial: evolving to better serve the many troubled, defiant, challenged and violent students who come through the classroom door each morning.

 “There is no more important test of a nation’s place in history than the condition of its children.”  I don’t know if he had high-stakes testing in mind when he spoke, but please consider newscaster Tom Brokaw’s words as a plea for you to reconsider current regulations.

As you work in your government buildings, if you could hear the words being said in school buildings, you would hear teachers saying: “Legislators and Governors, give K-12 control back to educators.”

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
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Our New Professional Development Website for Teachers, Principals & Counselors

 

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If You Think We Look Pretty in Blue

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professional development classWe've gotten a makeover. Not me. Actually, it's our website that has gotten a pretty dramatic makeover, the first in a very long time.

Hi. This is Ruth Herman Wells, Director of Youth Change Workshops. I'm the one teaching a professional development course in the picture shown at right.

Below you can see a picture of our new, improved, better-than-ever professional development resource website. Take a look at our "Before" and "After" glamor shots. Don't worry. Our site is now very beautiful, but still packed with serious answers for all your most serious student behavioral, emotional and motivational problems.
 

Youth change books

 BEFORE 

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Bigger Website, More Resources

Youth Change's site is bigger than ever before and better organized. There are still tons of free behavior management strategies, worksheets, expert help, and tutorials.

We are still sending our free sample student behavior improvement worksheets by mail. This  Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog for teachers, counselors, social workers, juvenile justice workers and guidance staff is still being emailed to you each month, and it's still free too. Not a subscriber? Sign up here.
 

What's Free?

If you take a look at our new website and use this email link before April 5, 2013 to tell us what you think, we'll send you all the cool resources shown below for free. We think the resources below offer such effective strategies to prevent and manage students' behavior, motivation and emotional problems, that they can help your students look like they've had a makeover too.

classroom poster 39Teacher free resources for classroom managementclassroom poster 45

 

 

 


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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
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Our 100th Classroom Management Blog: Best Educational Articles and Strategies

 

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Our 100th Classroom Management Blog:
Best Educational Articles
and Strategies

 
 

 

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Get ready to celebrate our 100th issue of the Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog.

This blog first began in 1999 as an online magazine and has been published nearly once a month ever since. We have over 15,000 teachers, counselors, principals, juvenile justice workers, special educators, instructors and youth professionals throughout North America as subscribers.

For all 100 issues, I've been your source. My name is Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I provide behavior and classroom management consultation, workshops and help throughout North America. I'm the author of dozens of books on how to manage student behavior problems.

As we looked back on 7 years and all 100 issues of this magazine, we thought we'd bring you the top intervention from each year. Our selections are based on the comments we receive from participants at our live workshops. Chances are you haven't read every word of each of the 100 issues, or been a subscriber for the full 7 years, so here are some of our most adored and talked-about interventions that you just may have missed.
 

The Best Strategies From Articles
in the First 100
Behavior and Classroom Management
Problem-Solver Blog Issues

 

Top Intervention from 1999
If Life Were This Easy

Classroom Management Poster 2Use this intervention with students who think your services are a waste of time.

To use this intervention, read or show one sentence of the following text, one sentence at a time. Allow students to laugh and snicker at each sentence before revealing the next phrase.

This intervention works really well, and is fun. Enjoy! (You can purchase this intervention as our Poster #2.)

Here's your new, high-paying job– and you can never be fired from it!
Here's your new, beautiful spouse, who is always cheerful, never sick, and has tons of money!
Hope you like your new home. It's your dream house and it's paid for, and will never need repairs!
Here's all the possessions you've ever wanted, and, of course, they are already paid for!

If life were this easy, you wouldn't need us!

 

Top Intervention from 2000
Mamas, Don't Let Your Daughters Grow Up to be Dropouts

Here are "5 Frightening Facts for Females" that every potential female dropout needs to know:

1) No one earns less than a female drop-out
2) She earns considerably less
3) Her salary will likely drop by about 1/2% annually
4) Teen moms are the most likely to drop out of school, go on welfare, and live in poverty
5) Teen moms are the most likely to never get out of poverty

 

Top Intervention from 2001
It's Okay to Be Mad

This simple intervention remains very popular. Simply teach students "It's okay to be mad. It's not okay to be mean."

 

Top Intervention from 2002
But I Hate Everything

This popular intervention was created by a foster parent who regularly heard from her foster children that they hated being placed in foster care, hated their new school, and so on. Her reply: "Bloom where you're planted."

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 printable classroom management postersTop Intervention from 2003
Are You Ready for High Tech Planet?

People sure love our multiple choice quizzes. Here's an excerpt from one of our most enduring quizzes, Can You Speak the Language on High Tech Planet?

Soon, everyone may need a home computer to perform essential everyday activities. Luckily, I already have an ISP. It's

a) The I Sense Psychics Channel
b) An Icy Spinach Parfait
c) An Internet Service Provider, which is necessary to connect to the internet

Poster #284, shown above, offers you an additional classroom management and motivational strategy. Open it to view it in more detail.

 

Top Intervention from 2004
The Sounds of Silence

Here is a terrific device to quiet your group quickly. This intervention is a lot of fun. Using a TV remote control, teach students to become "mute" when you push the button on the remote. Students really like this intervention, and will often become mute mid-word, just like a TV would. If you wish, this technique can be used throughout class, and at other times. You can even let students help you manage your class by having a youngster operate the remote control, and of course, the students love that.

 

Top Intervention from 2005
What a Nerd

Here is another simple intervention that our workshop participants always comment on. This intervention is meant to be told as a joke. "What do you call a nerd in five years?" Answer: "Boss."

 

New Intervention from 2006
Now, More Than Ever: Sports Stars Need School

We have a new trend in sports, announced in today's newspapers. A new, national, pro football league that will begin play in 2007, will only accept players who have completed their college degree– yes, that was college degree. Let's hope that other sports will take note and soon follow.

 

Like These Behavior and Classroom Management Interventions from Our Blog?
Many of these popular interventions are from our books and posters, like the resources shown below. Call 1-800-545-5736 or click Live Help if you have questions.

Isn't it time to stop using yesterday's methods with today's kids?

 

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Innovative Teaching Strategies: Teach Students Teacher Interaction Skills

 

innovative teaching strategies

 

Innovative Teaching Strategies:
Teach Students Teacher Interaction Skills

 
 

 

Virtually every school expects students to interact appropriately with teachers. However, most schools have no formal, written-down plan to train students to have acceptable teacher interaction skills. Years ago, families more reliably prepared their offspring to respond appropriately to teachers. Unfortunately, that is no longer the case; many youngsters are rude, disruptive, defiant, and disrespectful.

innovative teaching strategyI'm workshop trainer Ruth Herman Wells, M.S., the instructor presenting Youth Change's Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop.

Recently at some of our live workshops around the country, we have been hearing a lot about student misconduct that is becoming far more serious than ever before. Each spring around this time, our Live Expert Help service (shown at the bottom right on any page of our site), begins to generate rather desperate requests for help from teachers who report being increasingly unable to control their classroom.

Based on some of the comments in our live workshops, and from requests for Live Help, it seems important to recap what is acceptable behavior in the classroom. It also seems like a good time to review how to maintain control over seemingly uncontrollable students. Below, you will find the top questions on these topics that we have been getting at our workshop and via our Live Expert Help Page.

All the questions and answers relate to students who are having problems relating acceptable to their teachers. The answers will offer the innovative teaching solution of actually step-by-step training kids to be prepared, motivated students with appropriate teacher interaction skills.

 

Innovative Teaching Strategies That
Build Appropriate Teacher Interaction Skills
 

innovative teachingQ: I have male students who are not just touching female peers inappropriately, but me too. What do I do?

A: This is an example of the increasingly inappropriate behavior being reported by teachers. This type of misconduct rises to a whole new level.

First, the conduct you describe is far beyond what any teacher should tolerate in a classroom, but it is important to note that this behavior is quite likely also illegal as that type of sexual harassment is not usually legally permissible.

Second, you are describing a situation that is extremely unsafe for you and your female students. Your first responsibility as a teacher or youth professional is always safety. This dangerous situation can not continue. You need to seek help immediately from your principal or other comparable resource.

Third, whenever a classroom or group of young people is utterly out of control, it is usually quite difficult to re-gain control. Because of that, we usually strongly recommend that the problematic class or group be terminated– at least as far as your young people are concerned– and a new class or group initiated in its place. It is far easier to start again than to clean up a situation that has deteriorated to the point that you describe.

In the future, we strongly recommend that you set much higher, tighter standards, and force yourself to adhere to them. If you are unsure how to enforce higher standards, get training from us or another source right away. Our live and online Breakthrough Workshop give immediate help. You can also call us at 1.503.982.4220 or click on Live Expert Help at the bottom right corner of each page.

You can always ease up if you start off firm, but it can be nearly impossible to tighten up if you start off being loose. When you are unsure of how to react, always err towards being too firm. Have high expectations for conduct. You can easily ease up if your firmness is unnecessary or too extreme. Your situation is extremely unlikely to get better, and is quite likely to worsen because there are no "brakes" being offered to stop or slow the inappropriate contact. Don't wait until a tragedy happens to take action; get help today.

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innovative teaching strategyQ: My students have no clue how to act reasonably towards teachers. What can I do?

A: Before you expect teacher interaction skills, you must teach them. You wouldn't expect math skills until you taught those skills; the same is true with teacher interaction skills.

lastchcovnewTo determine what skills to teach, you can start by making a list of the problems you are seeing. You can include problems like disrespect, verbal abuse, non-compliance, and so on. Next, prioritize that list, putting your biggest concerns at the top. We recommend that safety concerns top the list.

 Next, identify a time to provide teacher interaction skill instruction to your students focusing on the first few items on your list. You can use entire class periods or the start of the class. It doesn't matter where you put the training, but that you do it. You will probably be delighted with the results, but be sure to include motivating students to accept the training. Our Last Chance School Success Guide has very engaging lessons so you don't have to develop ideas on your own.

 

improve classroom managementQ: I have a lot of students who just seem to hate all teachers. Am I right that there is not a lot that I can do to change that?

A: Actually, we have a lot of wonderful student attitude adjustment devices that can re-shape the way these youngsters view and interact with teachers.

innovative teaching methodsHere is an intervention that is a favorite in our live workshops. Create a little manual, like those small booklets that come with a new computer or a new jacket. Call it "A Student's Guide to the Care and Heeding of Teachers," or something similar. (Our version, which is part of our $15 Last Chance School Success Guide is pictured at right; the book is shown above.)

In the manual, you can put humorous text on "What to Do When Your Teacher Doesn't Work Right," and "How to Get Your Teacher to Do What You Want." Next, hang the manual from a thread, and attach it to your sleeve. Inevitably, a student will soon ask: "What's that hanging off your sleeve?" You can respond with feigned surprise at discovering the manual, and then read it to your students. What a fun and unusual way to begin a dialogue.

If you don't want to have to make your own manual, you will find a very funny, nicely illustrated one in our Last Chance School Success Guide. That book also has "A Teacher's Guide to the Care and Heeding of Students," which can quickly engage even the most sour youngster.

 

improve class managementQ: What can I do about the constant interruptions from some students during class?

A: Have you given your students a recommended number of times to talk out per class? We find in our workshops that most teachers haven't provided any quantifiable standard for students to follow. In essence, that means you are asking students to adhere to an unspecified standard. A lot of your students may lack the ability to determine this standard on their own. The first step must be providing a quantifiable standard.

Also, be sure that you teach specific skills like hand raising if you require it. If the interruptions persist, you can require students to turn in a chip or marker to talk. If you recommend students talk 8 times per class, give out 8 chips. There is another version of this last intervention, which you may prefer. Bring a large TV remote control to class, and tell students that you have to point the remote at them to turn on their volume before they are permitted to speak. Students often adore this fun intervention, and it can ease any power struggles that were occurring. You can even put a student in charge of the remote control, which will quickly become a highly coveted job. Students can even earn the opportunity to do that job by talking out properly during class. A chronic problem can become a non-problem.
 

Want more innovative teaching strategies, ideas, tips, tricks?

Check out our state-of-the-art workshops, online courses with affordable college credit and free clock hours, posters, books and ebooks at our Problem Student Problem-Solver Store.

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    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.