The Five Fastest & “Funnest” Student Behavior Management Strategies

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

The Five Fastest & “Funnest”

Classroom Management Ideas & Strategies

 


classroom management help

classroom management help

classroom management help

 

expert classroom management toolsNext Live Workshops:

 

30% OFF!

Seattle

Breakthrough

Strategies

Workshop

Behavior and Budget Problems Stop Here!

Now $119 for 2 Days, $90 for 1 Day
Coupon Code: 30% OFF Seattle 2019 | Valid through 04-17-19
Register  |  Workshop Information

Working with difficult students doesn’t have to be so difficult

What kind of year will it be without our 200 problem-stopping strategies?

 


 

The Five Fastest & “Funnest”

Classroom Management Ideas & Strategies

classroom management ideas

Behavior management and classroom management strategies that utilize humor or fun, get the job done faster as students don’t normally become as reactive or oppositional to lighter, fun approaches. So, please forgive the bad grammar, but below you will find five of our fastest and “funnest” student behavior and classroom management ideas. Hello from Youth Change Workshops’ Director, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I hope you will come to Seattle in two weeks to get 200 additional innovative, more effective classroom management ideas and strategies when we host a general session of our Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop. Information on this information-packed classroom management strategies workshop is here. Register here and get a 30% discount when you use this coupon code: 30% OFF Seattle 2019.

 

classroom management strategies and ideas

#1. Silly Classroom Management Idea
       for Sensitive Topics

fast classroom management strategiesIf you know a topic is loaded with tension and emotion, that’s the perfect time to employ humor. The human brain has trouble holding two conflicting emotions at once so what typically happens is that the student will grin or laugh before the negativity kicks in. That brief moment of understanding the silly sign or poster, puts you one small step closer to perhaps ultimately changing attitudes for the better. Racism is one of the toughest issues to tackle because students may already have entrenched built-in bias from home or their community. That makes a silly approach much smarter than a more straight-forward one. You don’t have to buy Poster #668. Instead of buying it, wait for a time when you need a creative consequence for a creative student. Instead of giving a traditional consequence, have the student make a silly poster similar to Poster #668 that is pictured at right.  If you wish, you can print or display the picture of that poster for use as inspiration for your student.

 

classroom management strategies and ideas

#2. Silly Classroom Management Idea
       Help Students Follow the Rules

fast classroom management helpYou don’t have to spend your entire school year reminding students to follow your classroom and school rules. Here is a very fun and silly classroom management idea that tends to reduce the amount of reminders and sanctions you have to give because your students “didn’t know the rules” or “forgot.” Students will normally learn infinitely faster from an enjoyable game than from another lecture or stern reminder. This game is fun and even better, it provides a fast and effective way to help students remember and follow classroom and schools rules and policies. It’s called Classroom Excuses Bingo. To use this intervention, simply create a bingo card (or cards), and replace the letters and numbers typically found on a Bingo card with the excuses you hear from your students. You may want to have a few fun prizes to the winner of Classroom Excuses Bingo to ramp up involvement and interest to the maximum possible. Alternatively, ask students to design the Classroom Excuses Bingo cards. That task would make a wonderful alternative consequence for any student who has broken a rule or policy. If you want to see an enlarged version of this example Bingo card, click here to view our Poster #543

 

 

classroom management strategies and ideas

#3. Silly Classroom Management Idea
       Build Motivation for School and Education

classroom management ideaIn our workshop that is coming to Seattle in a couple weeks, we will spend hours giving creative, surprising and fun motivational methods for the most unmotivated students. One of our favorites is pictured at right. It looks like a lottery ticket but the text has been redone to make a complete eduction the ultimate prize. You can see this example enlarged; it’s our Poster #496. You can use a picture of Poster #496 as an example for students to make their own lottery tickets that promote education, or, you can discuss the poster as shown. Either way, you are going to be practically “sneaking” your motivational message into your students’ brains. Information presented in silly ways is just so much faster and easier to send and receive. You will see that for yourself once you try some of our silly classroom management ideas with your students. Plus, a side benefit is that it isn’t just more fun for students. Most teachers would much rather teach a silly lesson than have to give another lecture or consequence for some classroom issue.

Article Continues Below

 


 

30% OFF!

Seattle Breakthrough Strategies Workshop

Behavior and Budget Problems Stop Here!

 

Now $119 for 2 Days, $90 for 1 Day

Coupon Code: 30% OFF Seattle 2019

Valid through 04-17-19

Register   Workshop Information

 


 

 

 

classroom management workshops

Schedule
Your On-Site
Inservice Workshop Now

It’s More Affordable Than You Think

Learn 100s of Strategies for Work Refusers, Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated and Withdrawn Students

1.800.545.5736 or Email

One Click Can Solve It All

 

 

Article Continues Here

classroom management strategies and ideas

#4. Silly Classroom Management Idea
       Address Cultural and Gender Norms

K-12 classroom ideasCultural norms and gender expectations are not normally very easy to rapidly change or improve. Many girls see STEM courses as “too hard” or “not for girls,” but STEM skills are likely to be the most in demand in the future. Lacking those skills will likely be a serious deficit. Possessing those skills will likely be a major asset as STEM careers typically pay more than many of the occupations viewed as “for girls.” This idea is perfect to chip away at the restrictiveness of gender and cultural norms that many girls may follow– probably without even realizing. The image at right is Poster #413. There are at least two ways to use this silly poster to start to change female students’ resistance to STEM classes. First, you can print a picture of the poster and use it as a discussion-starter. A second idea is to ask your students to make their own version of Clamor Magazine. This task can work really well to effect change because to make their creations, girls must be able to identify the restrictiveness of cultural and gender norms and their impact on assumptions and thinking. Having to create something similar to the example poster forces students to think differently than normal. That’s a great first step to help female students move away from some of the cultural or gender norms that may be holding them back from giving STEM classes more of a chance, and a bigger effort.

 

classroom management strategies and ideas

#5. Silly Classroom Management Idea
       Reduce Chronic Peer Problems

classroom management ideaIt’s spring. You know what that means: hormone-poisoned students who are more touchy-feely than you or your school wish. Instead of having to issue frequent reminders about your standards for contact, consider turning your classroom or school into a “No Cuddle Zone” and post appropriate signage. Now you have wall signs doing the heavy lifting 24/7, perhaps freeing you up to do more teaching and less reminding. An example wall sign is shown at right. It is our Poster #121. There is no need to buy the poster, just have one of your creative students whip up a few versions of their own. Creating No Cuddle Zone wall signs will also make a creative consequence for students who use problem contact in your No Cuddle Zone. The signs and the name make it difficult for students to say that they didn’t know that they were not supposed to engage in this type of behavior in school or class. The signs and the name tend to annihilate many of the excuses you hear all the time– and that’s a great result. So, stop battling students’ hormones this spring by employing some fun ideas to help them remember your class and school’s expectations. By incorporating some of these unusual, fun ideas into your classroom, maybe this spring, your students will be better prepared to focus more on the three Rs and less on PDA.

 

Article Permalink
https://www.youthchg.com/classroom-management-ideas

  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Must-Know Strategies for the 5 Most Common Student Mental Health Problems

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Must-Know Strategies

for the

5 Most Common

Student Mental Health Problems

 
 

 

student mental healthThere is no question that you are seeing many more student mental health problems than ever before. Many educators typically lack extensive or even basic training on student mental health problems and end up lacking many or all of the honed, more effective strategies and tools that juvenile mental health professionals have developed. This how-to article for educators and other non-mental health professionals is designed to remedy that oversight as much as possible given the limited space we have for a complex topic. This Top 5 list of student mental health problems is based on the feedback of the teachers, principals, school counselors and special educators that have attended our in-person Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshops recently. (You can attend too as our next live conference is coming up soon in Seattle on April 18-19, 2019 — and, even better, our conference scholarships are still open! Just call 800.545.5736 to grab one now.)

Hello from Youth Change Director Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I have spent my career teaching about key student mental health problems and diagnoses to educators and other non-mental health professionals. I am hoping that you will be able to immediately use the information included in this important article for teachers, principals, special educators and other non-mental health professionals who work with children and teens. Even though non-mental health professionals can’t diagnose, the how-to article below is intended to give you the language to better understand, manage and communicate about your students who are struggling with their emotions and/or thoughts.

 

Must-Know Strategies

for the

5 Most Common

Student Mental Health Problems

 

student with conduct disorder1. CONDUCT DISORDER

If you don’t know this disorder backwards and forwards and inside and out, then you are a vulnerable target for your most seriously acting-out students. In our workshops, we spend hours and hours on this disorder because the student who has this disorder is normally by far your most impossible-to-manage student– and this disorder is very common. Affecting an estimated 11-14% of your students, this disorder means that the child or teen is wired differently than other students. Lacking remorse, empathy and relationship capacity, this child’s signature is his extreme acting-out. That was not a misplaced pronoun. “He” is very often a he, not a she. Girls don’t very commonly have this disorder but they can have it, and when they do, their behavior is often beyond extreme.

Here are some passable examples of this disorder from popular culture: J.R. Ewing from the TV show Dallas, Sid the boy in the first Toy Story movie, and Eddie Haskell from Leave It to Beaver. Everyday, ordinary interventions always fail with this population and generally make the situation worse. That means that your go-to interventions that work well or okay with other students, routinely let you down with this population. That’s why working successfully with children who have or may have conduct disorder requires that you use specialized interventions that are different from what you normally use. Since this youngster lacks a heart and relationship capacity, strategies that require empathy or compassion will always fail. There is no way I can capture this problem for you in this tiny space but there are countless free articles on our site to guide you, plus online courses and books. Go to our free, introductory Conduct Disorder mental health article to learn more about this common, serious disorder and to discover the kinds of strategies that must be used– and those that must never be used– with this very difficult-to-control student.

 

student mental health problem

2. CLINICAL DEPRESSION

Sure, lots and lots of adolescents are depressed but that’s not clinical depression. Clinical depression is more serious, more prolonged and more difficult than ordinary adolescent angst. For all mental health diagnoses, a mental health or health professional is needed to diagnose, but whether or not you can diagnose, you can certainly adjust how you work with children and teens who appear to be clinically depressed. The top go-to step for seriously depressed children and teens is working with  a mental health clinician. Next, after that, there are three major strategies that have been shown to be effective. First, depressed students often can benefit from having the chance to vent their concerns. Almost any adult can do a least some listening. Second, exercise, mindfulness training and meditation offer depressed students really useful tools. Along the same line, teaching students how to better manage their upsetting thoughts, can have a lot of value. The third strategy to consider is to arrange with the family for an anti-depressant but there is a risk of self-harm for this option, and this option can be difficult to set up. Studies suggest all three methods together work better than any of the strategies separately.

Depression needs to be taken seriously and it can definitely spur students to behaviors that are very concerning. As a society we are more attuned to paying attention to acting out, not giving as much notice to the more subtle, less obvious, less overt, more quiet phenomena of depression. Don’t let that cultural norm prevent you from devoting time to students whose behavior may be acceptable but their emotional functioning may still be of great concern. Depressed students are just as worthy and needing of your attention as students who command your attention with acting-out behavior. Read more about how to help students who face clinical depression in our free how-to articles.

 

Article Continues Below

 

 

classroom management workshops

Schedule
Your On-Site
Inservice Workshop Now

It’s More Affordable Than You Think

Learn 100s of Strategies for Work Refusers, Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated and Withdrawn Students

1.800.545.5736 or Email

One Click Can Solve It All

 

 

Article Continues Here

 

bipolar disorder

3. BIPOLAR DISORDER

I am including this student mental health problem here not because it is a very common disorder; it’s actually not as common as many other childhood and teen disorders. I am including it because so many of the teachers and principals that I see in my workshops and at conferences, are confused about what this disorder is all about. This disorder used to be called Manic-Depression and I think that old title was really helpful to remind non-mental health workers what this problems is all about. This disorder means that the child or teen gets really depressed then suddenly starts being out-of-control with little in between. They go from 0 miles an hour to 150 miles an hour in a flash. It is a very unpleasant, distressing disorder that can be extremely hard to manage unless the family gets a diagnosis and follows through very carefully on medication. Medication is the first, second and third best strategy. That is my silly way of saying that medication is just incredibly important.

I’m not sure if there is anything that even comes close to being as helpful as meds, but skill training can be very useful. The skill training must focus on teaching the child to take their meds. Skill training also needs to prepare the child and family to cope effectively with any issues that they may develop about the medication or its side effects as regularly taking medicine as directed is crucial to getting and keeping this youngster stabilized. When the child is unmedicated or missing doses, their manic behavior can quickly get very extreme and inappropriate, even illegal. If you are not a mental health professional and you think you are working with a child who could have this serious disorder, you need to alert your supervisor at once and hopefully you will be able to arrange a thorough evaluation. This disorder typically is found to start when the person is a young adult or older adult but it can occur earlier.

 

 

school mental health4. OPPOSITIONAL DEFIANT DISORDER

This disorder looks at first to be just like conduct disorder but that is not a very accurate perception. The difference between conduct disorder (C.D.) and oppositional defiant disorder (O.D.D.) may not be readily obvious but it is incredibly important. Treatment for O.D.D. varies dramatically from that offered for conduct disorder. While students with O.D.D. and C.D. typically both misbehave and can be aggressive and non-compliant, the behavior of the student with C.D. is normally far more extreme, frequent and damaging to people, animals and property. While that difference is important, the really important difference is that the child with C.D. lacks a conscience and that is a huge problem. Lacking a conscience, relationship capacity and empathy for others, the student with C.D. can track towards crime and other behaviors that society doesn’t permit.

The student with O.D.D. is believed to have a conscience, but that conscience isn’t doing very much to help. A good conscience can provide very good brakes for bad behavior. Absent that conscience, a child will do what they want, when they want, to who they want. That is precisely what makes children with C.D. so potentially dangerous and so very hard to manage in any environment. Being diagnosed with O.D.D. is far more hopeful than being diagnosed with C.D. as the hope is that if that conscience can be better activated, the student can behave better.

While both sets of students need extensive training to manage their fist, mouth and actions, the student with O.D.D. has a far more optimistic prognosis. The student diagnosed with C.D. will never learn to care about others and is pretty much always going to be reined in using consequences and possibly rewards. The student with O.D.D. can really do very well once their conscience is more dominant and they have mastered how to be a civilized, law-abiding, compliant human. If you are not a mental health professional, be sure to try to arrange a thorough mental health evaluation so you know whether you’re working with an apple or an onion. While these two disorders can look somewhat the same, you have to be very careful to proceed differently depending on which disorder is actually occurring in a student.

 

trauma informed5. STUDENTS WITH TRAUMA

Unlike the previous items, this issue is not a mental health diagnostic category. However, “trauma-informed” practice has been a prominent concept lately so that combined with the huge frequency of trauma, led me to include this issue here. If you work with kids, you are working with some youngsters who have faced, or are facing traumatic events such as abuse, violence, abandonment or crises. Students facing trauma who are evaluated by a mental health clinician, can receive varying mental health diagnoses (like depression and PTSD, for example), but it is that common thread of trauma that I wanted to address.

Students who are traumatized often have little energy for school or whatever service your site offers. These youngsters need help from a mental health professional but they also need to not face more unnecessary stress in your environment– even when they don’t do much school work, are selectively mute and uninvolved in activities. The key here, regardless of the diagnosis, is to strike a balance between being sensitive to what this child may be living through and your mission. When the child is more functional, increase expectations a bit but if the increase sends the child into a tailspin, then return to the last level where the youngster was successful. When the child is less functional, decrease expectations a bit and work cooperatively to maximize the child’s involvement but without adding to the child’s already heavy load.

Many of your work refusing students are children who are coping with traumatic events. After enduring serious incidents of trauma, children may be diagnosed with PTSD, Post-Traumatic Syndrome Disorder, which is a very concerning diagnosis. These youngsters, in particular, need your site to be a haven, not more misery, so working with these children very carefully and delicately is strongly recommended. Children who have lived through much horror at a young age and lack resilience, are very brittle and easily broken. The bottom line is that you  may be the only sane, sober adult in the child’s universe. If instead of being helpful, you are yet another harmful adult, you can help track the child in the wrong direction. Conversely, if you offer help, empathy, guidance and a moderate, unstressful intervention plan, you can often engineer some progress, albeit slow.

 

Article Permalink
https://www.youthchg.com/student-mental-health-problems

  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Social-Emotional Learning Strategies to Improve Student Behavior

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Better Solve Behavior Problems with

Strategies for Students’
Social and Emotional Learning

 
 

 

teacher classroom management helpIf you’re a teacher and you’re not using social-emotional learning strategies all day long in your classroom, you may be able to really ramp up your academic results if you begin to incorporate that type of methods when working with students who present behavior problems.

Sometimes some students’ behavior can seem incomprehensible. Some students can seem to almost randomly act out with a cycle or pattern of the students being acceptably behaved for a long time, then poorly behaved for no obvious reason. Misbehavior that appears to be random, usually has causes that a teacher may not be able to readily see or even know about. Often, the student has problems at home, in the community, with their family, their mental health, substance abuse, or their functioning that are not readily discernible– even to the adult who may spend the most time with them during the week. But, if you could see into your students’ homes and lives outside of school, you would have all the answers you need to understand what is going on to prompt the problem behavior.

In this issue, we’ll take you behind the scenes as best we can, then load you up with both preventative and intervention strategies. This article is in keeping with the recent national attention being given to social and emotional learning, as well as the use of trauma-informed interventions in schools and classrooms. Here, we’re going to focus on students’ social and emotional problems, as well as the trauma that some youngsters have to cope with. Since most educators get very little mental health training to cope with the serious social and emotional problems today’s students present, this article will hopefully be exactly the help you better identify, understand and manage students’ social and emotional problems.

Hello from Youth Change Workshops’ Director Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I’m a mental health professional and I am going to be giving you some key mental health strategies to help you better manage your students’ social and emotional problems. Student social and emotional problems seem to be on the rise right now, so this article is well-timed to help you best help your students.

 

social emotional learning methodsStrategies for
Students’ Social and Emotional Problems

Here are some classic behavioral concerns that teachers often encounter with students– and the underlying truth about the powerful social and emotional causes that can be the cause of the evident behavior problem. After reviewing these scenarios, my hope is that you will stay mindful that today’s teachers have to always be stopping to look for the social and emotional causes of students’ behavior problems. It may be futile or quite difficult to try to resolve many common, everyday student behavioral problems without addressing the social and emotional issues that cause and sustain the behavioral concerns. Conventional training for teachers does not necessarily include thoroughly preparing educators to spot and manage students’ social and emotional issues, further complicating the situation.

 

“They’re Not Doing What They’re Supposed to Do”

It is really easy for an overworked teacher to focus on the obvious, things like missing school supplies, tardiness or disinterest. It is also really easy for teachers to come to view some students as just “not doing what they’re supposed to do.” The truth is that sometimes this type of ordinary, everyday problems– like having no pencil– are sometimes the manifestation of an overarching, larger issue that is having serious deleterious impact on a student’s functioning in the classroom and school. What teacher hasn’t chided a student for having no pencil? We’ve all done that countless times. Yet when a student’s social and emotional circumstances are not given sufficient heed, that ordinary intervention of chiding a child for having no pencil can create new problems in the student.

In the example below, the student sounds like he is becoming more angry, discouraged, frustrated and sad. The poem reproduced below, will take you behind the scenes and become a reminder for you that sometimes the real problem isn’t the missing pencil. Sometimes the real problem is what happened at home before the student even left for school. As you read this short poem, notice how focusing on the pencil will never help this student.

Cause I Ain’t Got a Pencil

by Joshua T. Dickerson

I woke myself up

Because we ain’t got an alarm clock

Dug in the dirty clothes basket,

Cause ain’t nobody washed my uniform

Brushed my hair and teeth in the dark,

Cause the lights ain’t on

Even got my baby sister ready,

Cause my mama wasn’t home.

Got us both to school on time,

To eat us a good breakfast.

Then when I got to class the teacher fussed

Cause I ain’t got no pencil

 

“They’re Too Distracted”

It’s true that the typical classroom includes many distracted students. But for many of these youngsters, the biggest problem isn’t their difficulty focusing. For many of these students, the bigger problem is likely to be something that the teacher can’t readily see or be aware of. In one of the schools near our office, there was a 10 year-old who kept complaining of a stomach ache nearly every day just around noon, and he would ask to go home. Understandably, the teacher was concerned about the daily distraction from academics and school. The teacher tried all the conventional strategies to address the somatic complaint:  Sometimes she would send him to the school nurse, sometimes she told him to just put his head down, other times she asked if he had eaten. Eventually, she sent him to the school guidance counselor who tried more of the same type of interventions, all focusing on the distraction of the tummy ache. After conventional interventions that focused on the distraction had all repeatedly failed, the counselor began to ask the boy if something was wrong, if something was troubling him. After a few times of being asked, eventually the boy did reply: “Yes, there is something wrong. There is something terribly wrong. My family is being evicted and I’m scared that if I don’t get home right away, that by the time I get there, the sheriff will come and my family will leave town without me and I’ll end up being an orphan.”

The interventions that focused on the apparent problem could never had engendered any improvement. By switching to an intervention that focused on possible social and emotional issues, the problem could be readily solved. The counselor had the parents explain to their offspring that they would never leave town without him, and the stomach aches stopped permanently. When you look past the apparent presenting problem to consider any possible social and emotional factors, often you can solve the original problem faster and far more effectively. This story is the perfect reminder to stop focusing on just the pencil or tummy ache, and start focusing on the unknown social and emotional concerns that may be the much bigger force behind a students in-school and classroom behavior.


Article Continues Below

 

classroom management workshop

Schedule
Your On-Site Inservice Workshop Now

It’s More Affordable Than You Think

Learn 100s of Strategies

for Work Refusers, Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated, Angry,
Failing, Sad and Withdrawn Students

1.800.545.5736 or Email

One Click Can Solve It All

 

 

Article Continues Here

social emotional learning“They’re Lazy”

It’s easy to begin to see some underperforming students as lazy. Certainly, based on their work completion and quality, these students can appear to simply be uninterested and unwilling to put in the requisite effort needed to succeed in the classroom and school. A teacher came up to me at one of the workshops I was teaching and looking a bit embarrassed, she told me about one of her students, a girl who had begun to do very little work in school. The teacher had been really “on her case”– to use the teacher’s words– to do more of her school work and homework. Then the teacher headed into the teachers’ lounge and while there, she overheard the school guidance counselor talking. The guidance counselor was letting the school faculty know that the reason the girl had been doing so little in school was that the girl’s father hadn’t come home in a month and his absence was causing the family to be swamped with fear and grief. After hearing that, the teacher said “If I’d only known what the student was going through, of course I wouldn’t have added to her misery.” Make this teacher’s confession your guide to always taking the time to check in with struggling students to see if there are any significant social or emotional problems that could be interfering with their performance in your classroom.

“They’re Slow Learners”

It’s hard to imagine the scary, sad or lonely home life that some students face. For some students, their neighborhoods and communities are the setting for a brutal childhood that most of us can’t even begin to conceptualize. Especially if you were blessed to grow up in a home and community that were safe and nurturing, it can be tough to picture and remain sensitive to the grueling circumstances that some of today’s children and teens face.

The reality of our contemporary time is that the teacher may be the only sane, safe, sober adult in some students’ universe. That grossly magnifies the impact of the teacher’s behavior on these emotionally fragile students. When a teacher is not addressing potential social and emotional factors when selecting interventions, that delicate bond between the student and teacher can be quickly damaged. Conversely, when a teacher does factor social and emotional issues into the choice of intervention strategies, the bond between student and teacher can become really strong. That strong bond can create an environment where even traumatized, emotionally disturbed and troubled students attempt to work as hard as they can on days they are able– and that is the perfect goal for working with deeply impaired students.

You must strike a balance between the horrors that a child is living with, and your mission to provide education. The world still requires everyone to have adequate skills and education in order to function, with no exceptions given for people who had rough childhoods. So, by balancing the child’s pain with their need for a complete education, you are being sensitive to difficult circumstances that the child is facing, but you never abandon your mission to educate them. If you prioritize education over their suffering, you tend to lose ground with the child. If you prioritize their suffering over education, you tend to produce a child with limited education and skills. By attending to both priorities, you are still giving this troubled child an education, but without adding to the child’s already heavy load. The excerpt below will cement in this point so you can stay mindful of it in your classroom. The passage is taken from John Seryak’s book, “Dear Teacher.”

Gestures that some teachers make and may consider routine, might be the rays of hope a traumatized child sees shining through the bleakness.  I can’t multiply or divide without a calculator, but more  important, I know how to add and subtract because of a 1st grade teacher who gave me little plastic cars to count as I stood with my classmates who knew the answers off the tops of their heads.  A teacher offered me tools that giving up was not the solution.  Making adjustments and discovering the choices available was the lesson I was guided towards understanding.  Teachers may be lifelines for children in crisis.  All that I had left was school, my saving grace:  I want you to know about me, the traumatized child, who, somehow, survived…I’m not certain that the nature of trauma a child experiences is hidden.  I think, more often, it’s overlooked.

 

Article Permalink
https://www.youthchg.com/social-emotional-learning/

  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


The Top 4 Student Mental Health Issues– Must-Have Tips

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

The Top 4 Student Mental Health Issues

Must-Have Tips on What to Do– and What Not Do

 

BUY 1, GET 1 FREE      

Workshop Registrations!

That’s $169 off!

Seattle: May 4-5, 2017

Behavior and Classroom Management Problems Stop Here

Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop

 teacher professional development

 

To Buy 1, Get 1 Registration FREE, say “21” and add second name when first register by phone; or, note in Comments when ordering online. Call 800.545.5736 or visit https://www.youthchg.com/teacher-workshops/ Expires 5-2-17. Not valid on existing and in transit registrations or $259 rate; must mention or say when first register, not later.

 Workshop Info


 

The Top 4 Student Mental Health Issues

Must-Have Tips on What to Do– and What Not Do


speaker student mental healthIt’s really amazing how more and more students seem to have serious mental health issues compared to as little as 15 or 20 years ago. With no disrespect intended, I am often surprised when I speak at school, juvenile justice, foster parent, counseling, social work and mental health conferences at how many common juvenile mental health diagnoses are either misunderstood or unfamiliar to the participants.

Hello from Youth Change Professional Development Workshops director, Ruth Herman Wells. That’s me in the image on the right, speaking at a large education conference in Florida in early 2017.  Often, when I try to explain a commonly misunderstood diagnosis, I almost get booed out of the building. Okay, that was an exaggeration but once at a Texas conference of several thousand, it did take a while until I got the group to settle down and listen. Then the room got really quiet as they realized that many of them had misunderstood some key diagnostic labels. I’m no diagnostic expert but I do know my basics really well and when you get done reading this, you will hopefully have a better grasp of some of the basics too if you don’t already.

WHY DIAGNOSTIC CATEGORIES ARE IMPORTANT

student with SEDIf you lack the ability to understand, refine and label what you are seeing, you are going to be far less effective. That’s why Eskimos apparently have many names for different types of snow. Understanding the snow differences might be important for travel, sport, fishing, hunting, and so on. Similarly, if you just see acting-out students, and sad kids, and angry kids but can’t refine beyond those rather global discriminations, that makes it much harder for you to intervene correctly, intervene using the correct strategies, communicate to others, explain to parents, or help locate the right mental health counselor, family therapist, psychologist, social worker or doctor, for example. But, the bottom line is that you simply won’t be as effective helping your emotionally disturbed and troubled students. There is a laundry list of woes that result when you don’t know your basic diagnostic categories for juveniles. One big risk: You can do great harm. The other big risk: You are much more likely to miss key opportunities to prevent or best manage serious or worsening issues like self-harm, self-endangering, acting out and law violations from occurring.

THE INFORMATION HERE IS JUST APPETIZERS

I can’t cram a semester’s worth of Juvenile Mental Health Diagnostic Categories 101 into this short article so I am going to give you just the starting point. Your homework is to go deeper than the headlines I am going to be able to give here. I will be giving you a quick description of the problems typically associated each diagnosis, and a quick description of the key issues you must be aware of. It will be your job to get the full picture yourself from a reputable source and not attempt to get by on the condensed information in this introductory article. We have hundreds of easy-to-read articles on tailoring your strategies to fit students’ mental health issues. Find them in our How-To Articles Archive.  If you haven’t already familiarized yourself with the Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM), that is the bible of mental health diagnosing, I urge you to take time to do that for at least the 4 diagnostic categories I am about to give you. They are, in my opinion, the top diagnoses for juveniles in our contemporary time. As a mental health professional, I know how important it is that absolutely every teacher, school counselor, juvenile court worker, foster parent, social worker and principal be familiar with these mental health designations.

THE TOP 4 JUVENILE MENTAL HEALTH DIAGNOSIS

Here are some of the most common, most unfamiliar and misunderstood juvenile mental health issues that appear to be on the rise, occurring in larger numbers than perhaps ever before. As a non-mental health professional, you can’t diagnose, but you can carry the concern in your mind and make adjustments accordingly. You already do that with other common juvenile mental health diagnoses like ADD, ADHD and depression. However, while those diagnoses are pretty widely understood, and useful, targeted strategies are well documented, the common disorders below are not as well known and are quite frequently misunderstood.

emotional problems1. Conduct Disorder

This is your most misbehaved student. The student is usually male and you can see some or all of the following behaviors, however this list is not complete: manipulation, lying, stealing, damage to people, damage to property,  no relationship capacity, no genuine remorse, no compassion, abusing animals, delinquency, rule violations, defiance, negative leadership, chameleon-like, persuasive, bullies. The hallmark of this disorder is that the child is believed to have no conscience. Without those critical brakes on the youngster’s behavior, this student can appear completely out of control. And he is.

This disorder is believed to occur with roughly 11-14% of the mainstream population. When the child becomes an adult, the disorder’s name is normally shifted to be the adult version of this juvenile diagnosis, switching to a designation such as Anti-Social Disorder. Some passable, but not ideal examples from popular culture: J.R. Ewing from the TV show, Dallas; McCauley Culkin in The Good Son movie; Sid, the boy dismembering toys in the Toy Story movie.

Here is the most important thing to know: Routine, everyday, common intervention strategies –like making amends, for example– fail to rein in this very unmanageable student. That is why in my inservice workshops, teachers and others often underscore that “nothing works” to manage this student. If you believe you are working with a child with this disorder, you must switch to a different style of intervention and avoid or extremely limit relationship-based approaches as not only do these methods fail badly, they usually make the situation worse. In addition, the use of counter-indicated intervention strategies often lead the student to believe that the adult doesn’t have a clue so they can just do whatever they want. This assessment is certain to create and/or worsen safety and behavior management issues.

Learn more about this common juvenile mental health diagnosis.

 

Article Continues Below

 

 

mental health teacher professional development

Schedule Your
Summer Inservice Workshop Now

It’s More Affordable Than You Think

But Open Dates Will Disappear Quickly

Learn 100s of Strategies for Work Refusers, Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated and Withdrawn Students

1.800.545.5736 or Email

One Click Can Solve It All

 

 

Article Continues Here

student counseling

2. Oppositional Defiant Disorder

Non-mental health professionals often confuse Conduct Disorder with Oppositional Defiant Disorder, abbreviated as ODD. To the lay person, ODD can seem to be very similar to Conduct Disorder.  This youngster does engage in problem acting-out behavior but the frequency, severity and duration of the misconduct is usually less than that seen from a student with Conduct Disorder. The overarching, key difference, however, is that the student with ODD does have a conscience but that conscience doesn’t appear to be having much positive impact. The key with this youngster is to “pull up” that conscience and get it to do its job better. That goal varies dramatically from the goal for working with students with Conduct Disorder. However, both students need to learn step-by-step to use more socially acceptable behavior, temper any rebelliousness and impulsiveness, and avoid leading or following other students into misconduct. Both types of students need firm rules and over-the-top consequences.

It is important to be aware that mental health counselors, social workers and other clinicians are hesitant to apply the diagnosis of Conduct Disorder as it has such grave implications for the child’s future. So often the diagnostician waits until the students’ behavior is so extreme that they feel comfortable and confident that they must apply that diagnosis. In the meantime, they may still be required to offer a diagnosis. Since there is no category of “I’m worried this kid may have Conduct Disorder,” diagnosticians often “park” the child in a catch-all category. The most popular catch-all category: ODD. So, quite often students initially labeled with ODD are really kids with Conduct Disorder who just haven’t acted out enough to “earn” the diagnosis. Sadly, this tendency to “park” youngsters confuses teachers and others who believe the “temporary” diagnosis. So what do you do under these circumstances? Use the methods for Conduct Disorders but don’t completely cut off relationship-based methods. However, use just a little bit of relationship-based methods and watch what happens. If the outcome is often grim, consider reducing the use of that class of intervention strategy dramatically as using relationship-based behavior management strategies with students who are actually Conduct Disordered, tends to fail spectacularly.

3. Thought Disorder

Although this is not a terribly common disorder, it is frequently misunderstood. Affecting about 1% of mainstream students, this disorder means that the student sees things no one else can see, hears voices no one else can hear, or has upsetting thoughts that are profoundly disturbing. An extreme, but good example is John Hinckley, who attempted to kill Ronald Reagan to impress Jodie Foster. Children and teens with thought disorder have trouble discerning what is real and what is only in their brain. The most important intervention is to have a mental health professional assess the child and possibly prescribe medicine that can control the disorder. This child has a conscience but her brain is not working right. This mental health problem is primarily a physiological issue although clearly the child’s behavior and functioning is gravely affected.

4. Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar Disorder used to be called Manic-Depression. That term was really a big help to aid non-mental health staff to remember what this disorder is all about. This disorder has two parts. The child swings rapidly at random intervals from being very depressed to being very excited and overwrought. This child also has a conscience, but they get so “up” when they swing quickly from being depressed to over-excited, that they can impulsively engage in all manner of problem behaviors. As with the child with thought disorder, medicine is the key. This is also a physiologically-based disorder even though it affects every aspect of the students’ life.

 

Article Permalink
https://www.youthchg.com/students-mental-health/

  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Successful School Discipline: How to Get Students to Follow the Rules

 

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Successful School Discipline:
How to Get Students to Follow the Rules

 

student discipline

Bullies in Class discipline

Classroom and school discipline can be the toughest part of any teacher’s or principal’s job. Even though discipline problems can dominate many school days, teacher training tends to be focused 80% on content and a mere 20% on behavior management and discipline. Many teachers and principals report receiving even less instruction on discipline, and student classroom management and behavior problems are often cited as the top reasons that teachers leave the profession entirely.

In our Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth professional development workshops (coming soon to Seattle on May 4-5, 2017), we devote hours teaching you how to have excellent student behavior management. It is also most definitely one of the most requested topics that our workshop participants ask us to cover. I’m the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop instructor, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. In this article, I’ll give you a peek into some of the top strategies we offer in our professional development inservice sessions. While this is certainly not a comprehensive article, it has some of our best tips to get you started on the path to successful school discipline. If you need more than the sampling of ideas briefly covered in this short how-to article, consider signing up for our Seattle Breakthrough Strategies Workshop sessions on May 4-5, 2017, where we will provide a whopping 200 interventions, all designed to produce successful classroom and school discipline.

 

Successful School Discipline:
How to Get Students to Follow the Rules

teacher classroom managementConvince Students of the

Importance of Rules

Many of us– whether young or old– fail to reliably follows rules and policies that we find to be unreasonable. Many very reasonable classroom and school rules are viewed by students to be totally bogus, and they act accordingly, and discipline suffers. To improve compliance with school and classroom rules, convince your students of the importance of those policies. Here is a fast and memorable way to accomplish just that. Remember: students who see value in the rules are far more likely to reliably follow those rules.

This strategy is a role reversal and many students can be offered the opportunity to participate in it. Ask one of your students to become the role play teacher. You may wish to choose a student who normally resists or ignores school or classroom rules. Offer the student a great prize in lieu of the paycheck that teachers earn. The prize can be anything that is enticing, such as getting out of class a bit early, or soda pop, or stickers, or whatever fits your age group. To earn the prize, the role-play teacher merely needs to teach the class to remember a 5 digit number. Sounds so easy, doesn’t it? But, this is a classroom with no rules. Even worse for the role play teacher, you’ve distributed a lot of the things you don’t want to see in class, items like bubble gum, snacks, cell phones, etc. If necessary, you can also prime several students to engage in other problematic behaviors like talk outs, being out of their seat, and so on.

The role play teacher attempts to teach your classroom and quickly discovers that it’s impossible. With your prompting, encourage the role play teacher to set rules, and attach the role play teacher’s name to the rules. Next, have him or her write the new rules on the board. After a while, retire your first role play teacher and give other class members a chance to experience teaching in a classroom without rules. Once enough students have gotten to experience the extreme difficulty of trying to teach in a class without rules, discuss whether there just might be values in rules. Not only will students view the rules differently, they are far more likely to follow them because their names are now attached to your classroom rules, and they are the ones that created those rules. Students are unlikely to hassle rules they created and named. You will be delighted at the difference in your classroom and school.

 

Teach Skills

Because Consequences

Will Never Compensate

control temper help

 

Many educators believe that if they simply have big enough consequences for school and classroom rule violations, that those sanctions are the way to ensure successful discipline. Sadly, that assumption is often completely wrong. If I say to you that unless you start speaking Swedish right now, you are going to face terrible consequences, most people in the U.S. still can’t speak Swedish. When you say to your students that if you engage in problematic conduct, you will face big sanctions, that is really no different.

If you want to excellent student behavior management and discipline, you must teach the behaviors that you expect– and also motivate students to see the importance of complying with the expectations, as discussed above. The clearest illustration is to look at your rules regarding the use of violence. Students who grow up in a violent family, for example, may have no idea how control their fist, mouth and actions. At home and in their neighborhood, using their fists may be commonplace, and consistently using more socially acceptable behaviors may be unfamiliar and seem undoable, just like you speaking Swedish on command. To expect a consequence to compensate for that deficit is naive and unrealistic, yet that is often what happens when schools expect students to magically change their behavior just because a heavy duty consequence can result. If you truly want student conduct to be better, you are going to have to teach those specific behaviors in an organized, step-by-step manner, very similar to the way you teach specific academic subjects. Further, just as you would never expect a student to magically or instantly learn calculus or to read, students can’t suddenly master self-control behavior skills.

Pictured above is a sample student worksheet that teaches acceptable behavior instead of aggression. It is from our Temper and Tantrum Tamers lesson book. Our website has thousands of resources that teach students self-control but our books, live professional development inservice workshops and online courses are your best bet.

 

Article Continues Below

 

 

classroom management help

Schedule Your On-Site Inservice Workshop Now

While Summer & Back-to-School Dates
Are Still Available

Learn 100s of Strategies for Work Refusers, Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated and Withdrawn Students

1.800.545.5736 or Email

One Click Can Solve It All

 

 

Article Continues Here

 

discipline postersBut My Classroom Is Completely Unmanageable

The truth is that some of you are still reading this article because your classroom or school seems really out of control, and there doesn’t seem to be any clear path toward reversing a worsening trend. Here is your solution:

First, if the classroom has really been quite out of control, it is usually far easier to start over than to clean up the existing situation. So, you will need declare Room 630 History Class or Mt. Vernon Elementary’s 3rd Grade Room 50 done and gone. Rename the space and start over. However, you must be able to re-start incredibly strong and firm or you will quickly find yourself back where you started.

Second, to avoid ever getting into this situation at all, we always recommend you start your school year being way too firm and strong in how you manage students. If you decide later to ease up, no student will fight you. However, if you start off a bit weak, indecisive or you are easily played by students, I can guarantee that you will not be able to easily– or perhaps ever– tighten up as students will fight hard to maintain the chaos, commotion and disruption that has become the standard. When you re-start, you must acknowledge the problems that occurred, clearly state what will be different, and then make sure that the new version of your classroom is firmly managed, with strict consequences, along with regular training that shows students how to meet behavior and discipline expectations. You will also need to motivate your students to see the value in school and education because a motivated student is far less likely to fritter away their education on misbehavior. Poster #471 (shown at right) is just one of our thousands of motivation-makers that transform kids into motivated learners. Our live conferences, online professional development seminars and books all can guide you because Youth Change Professional Development Workshops is your school discipline and behavior management expert. We are your classroom management authority, and we specialize in preventing and fixing serious, persistent behavior management problems. We’re here to help. You can email us here.

 

Article Permalink
https://www.youthchg.com/successful-school-discipline

  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Giga-Smart in a Wired World Activities Plus Get a Totally Free Workshop Registration

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Giga-Smart in a Wired World

Classroom Activities and Strategies

 
FREE Seattle May 5-6 Workshop Registration
Learn the details below

 



Attend Our Seattle Workshop Free

affordable professional developmentWe have strong registration for our Seattle, May 5-6, 2016 Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop but we are very much in need of helpers. Normally, we charge $84 to attend the workshop as a helper but if you would like to attend FREE and help out with the event, we need you. Please call 1.800.545.5736 to sign up and learn how easy it is to be a workshop helper. You can earn optional college credit or 10 free clock hours while learning 200 awesome, new strategies to turnaround problems like defiance, work refusal, tardiness, bad attitudes, apathy and more. We have just a couple slots to give out so call now. This offer is not available to people who have already registered or have a registration in process.


Giga-Smart in a Wired World

Classroom Activities and Strategies

professional development for educatorsAs our world goes more and more high tech, your students need to be ready. There are a lot of fantastic strategies in this issue, and all of them help prepare youngsters to live in a wired, wired world. Students who face barriers, challenges, family problems, crisis, or other concerns, are especially vulnerable to online danger. Hello from Youth Change Director Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. The picture on the right shows me teaching one of our many online professional development courses— just one more part of the real world that has gone cyber. This issue of our online magazine– yet another cyber entity– is packed with strategies and activities to help keep your students safe in an increasingly wired world.

 

student activity worksheetSilly Boys, Tech is For Girls

It is easier to stay safe in cyberspace when you have learned at least the basics. Girls sometimes can feel that tech is for boys. The relatively low rates of girls getting involved in STEM classes is a clear indicator of a trend that sadly continues into the workplace where women are often woefully underrepresented. Use humor to combat the stereotypes that girls can have about tech. This activity focuses on a very funny worksheet for girls and young women. It humorously overturns many stereotypes about girls and tech. You can download the activity worksheet on our website and print it for use in a discussion with female students. The worksheet can also be printed as an 11" x 17" poster, free to you for being a subscriber of this internet magazine.

 

How to Tell a Good Guy From a Bad Guy

This activity is a clever way to help students discover that in cyberspace, it is impossible to tell a good guy from a bad one if the two people don't know each other in the real world. Create about a dozen brief conversations that appear ripped from a typical social media site that you can call "FaceSpace." These online conversations could look like this:

Stranger: So do you want to meet up later?

Student: Sure

Stranger: Do you want to come over?

Print each conversation on one side of the page. On the other side, in big letters, put either "Good Guy" or "Bad Guy." Be sure that some conversations, like the one above, are relatively clearly reflecting a Bad Guy. Have other conversations that are more neutral, and some that appear safe but all/most should ultimately show Bad Guys in a way that conveys that "strangers online mean danger online," a phrase you can ultimately write on the board and discuss with students.

 

Dude, What's Your Cyber Q?

This activity helps you discover how cyber-smart your students really are. Test students' Cyber Q– "Q" is a shortened version of "IQ"– by asking them to define high tech terms like these: captcha, phishing, ISM, MB, pixel, SSL. They will need to know these terms to survive on our high tech planet. (Answers: captcha is a challenge that shows you are human not a robot; phishing means a scammer is "fishing" for your passwords and confidential information; ISM is the high paying job of Information Systems Manager, and he or she oversees computer networks; MB is a unit of measurement that describes the size of a file or data; pixel refers to the quality things like a photograph or monitor; SSL is short for Secure Socket Layer, and indicates whether a web page has been made secure for credit card transactions and other private activity.)

 

We All Work in a Wired, Wired World

Tech-averse students may not fully understand how difficult adult life will be without cyber skills. This activity can convince them to acquire more critical, basic tech skills. Inform students that nearly all jobs have a high tech component, from clocking in on an electronic time card system, to operating a PDA, to using a barcode scanner, so they can discover that  more and more work increasingly includes technology. Put two columns on the board, then ask students to list jobs not normally associated with high tech. Put their responses in the first column. Next, ask students to name how each low tech job might still require high tech skills. Put their answers in the second column. For example, waitresses may need to use smart phones and tablets to key in orders, scan credit cards, and tabulate bills. Another example: Baggage handlers at airports have to scan luggage tags and navigate through complex computerized security systems. Assist the class to realize that almost all jobs require tech skills because we are increasingly living in a high tech world.

Article Continues Below

 

 

teacher workshop

 

Schedule Your Summer and Fall

On-Site Inservice Workshop or Conference Now

While Open Dates Still Remain

Learn 100s of Strategies for Work Refusers, Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated and Withdrawn Students

1.800.545.5736 or Email

One Click Can Solve It All

 

 

Article Continues Here

 activities for k-12 students

Cyberbullying: Your Anti-Social Network

Write the word "cyberbullying" on the board, and ask students to discuss what the term means. Assist students to identify strategies to cope with, reduce, or eliminate the cyberbullying they may experience. For example, students can block bullying "friends" on Facebook. Give this guideline to help students recognize cyber bullying: "When it's no longer social networking but has become anti-social networking, that's cyberbullying, and means it's time to find a new network."

 

Grades by Facebook

This intervention activity helps students realize that problematic postings can come back to haunt them forever. Begin by asking students what kind of content is posted on Facebook and other social networking sites. Allow them to note that students sometimes post about partying, substance abuse, personal problems, and so on. Next, ask the group who views the content. Assist students to realize that content may be viewed by colleges and universities, and that some colleges, universities– and even employers– are requiring candidates to give them access to all their social networking pages prior to being accepted or hired. Help students to realize that problematic posts can negate the value of good grades when it comes time to be accepted at college, or hired for a job. Ultimately, you can help students see that hard work in school can be instantly destroyed by problem social media posts. You can call this phenomena "Grades by Facebook."

Article Permalink
https://www.youthchg.com/activities-for-students

  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Bad News for Dropouts Makes Improved Dropout Prevention Tools: Job That Are No More

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Bad News for Dropouts:


Jobs That Are No More
 

Compelling Dropout Prevention Resources to
Reduce Your Student Dropout Rate

 
 

 

motivational classroom posterBad job news for dropouts means improved, more powerful dropout prevention tools that can transform potential dropouts into motivated, successful students. If you work with youngsters who say that they do not plan to finish school, they should know that even robots finish school. That's important to know because these educated robots are in training to take over many of the jobs that are still open to dropouts.

Name the job that is still open to dropouts, and USA Today (5-1-03) can name the robot that can do the job cheaper Our popular Poster #148 provides graphic illustration. Check out what is happening to these jobs that your students say they will always be able to do without a diploma.

    G O I N G Nursing Home Aide
    G O I N G Aide to the Disabled
    G O N E Caregiver to the Elderly

Have you heard about Pearl? Pearl is a robotic nurse. She "has cameras for eyes, a computer screen for a chest and a tray or basket in which she can carry items to an elderly or disabled person," says USA Today. "That's so far away," your potential dropout may say hopefully. "Not true," you can reply. Pearl has already passed the testing stage for use in both nursing homes and private residences.

    G O I N G Maid
    G O I N G Housekeeper
    G O N E Custodian

It's called Roomba FloorVac, and it's not even expensive. For about the price of a regular vacuum, you can now own a robotic vacuum that can do the job without supervision. The Roomba will never call in sick, ask for a raise or beg for the day off either. Other devices exist or will soon exist for other cleaning chores.

    G O I N G Lawn Mower
    G O I N G Gardener
    G O N E Grounds Worker

dropout prevention posterIt costs just a bit more than a traditional lawn mower but no people are needed to run it. It's not a dream for the future but a product that is already for sale.

    G O I N G Baby Sitter
    G O I N G Nanny
    G O N E Child Care Worker

The ER-2 can not only tell stories or play games with kids while their parents are away, the device can also patrol the property. If the ER-2 detects a problem, it can not only notify you, but it can also show you a picture of the problem too. Machines will soon be able to prepare simple food items, set the table and clear it too. That's more than many baby sitters do. Dropout prevention posters can help hammer home the benefits of graduating, and our Poster #439 is the perfect example of how powerful these prevention posters can be.
 

Article Continues Below

 

teacher workshop

 

Schedule Your On-Site Inservice Workshop Now

It's More Affordable Than You Think

Learn 100s of Strategies for Work Refusers, Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated and Withdrawn Students

1.800.545.5736 or Email

One Click Can Solve It All

 

 

Article Continues Here


    how to motivate studentsG O I N G Home Aide
    G O I N G Attendant
    G O N E Personal Assistant

MARION-1 can turn on and off house appliances as you command via your cell phone, starting the oven or turning off the dryer. Soon, you can also purchase a robotic butler who will unlock the door of your home when you arrive, alert you to who else is home, and perform tasks for you on the internet. Other robots can call people by name and fetch or deliver items as directed. A machine named Grace can even register you for a conference, take notes, and chat with other attendees. Some of these machines even manage themselves. USA Today reports that MARION-1 even plugs itself in between charges when it feels "woozy." Our motivational dropout prevention Poster #149 illustrates our new world where computers rules.

Other jobs that don't require diplomas, but may be headed towards mechanization include fast food worker, customer service worker, receptionist, clerk, toll taker, cashier, dishwasher, bus boy, hostess, newspaper delivery person, and ticket taker.

It certainly appears that a high school diploma is far more critical than anyone could have imagined. Is there any encouraging news on the job front for potential dropouts? USA Today noted that machines used to tackle only repetitive tasks like factory work, or jobs that no human should have to do like searching for bodies during a disaster. Now, machines are starting to be able to take over jobs that may have been fine ways to earn a living, especially for people who had fewer employment options due to their lack of a diploma.

So the article had just the slightest morsel of hope for dropouts, but that hope was dashed by the end of the sentence. USA Today includes this blunt and devastating comment by Brandeis University robotics expert, Jordan Pollack: "I believe that there is a low-paid human who folds clothes cheaper than any robot we could make." You may wish to relay this information to students considering dropping out of school. Unless the student's dream job is to fold clothes for almost no money, they may want to do whatever it takes to get that diploma.
 

Article Permalink
https://www.youthchg.com/student-dropout-prevention

  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


How to Work with Students Who Use Violence to Refuse to Work in Class

 

violent students

 

Just Say "No," Don't Throw!

How to Work with Students
Who Use Violence
to Refuse to Work in Class

 

teacher workshop scholarshipsteacher workshops

 

 

students who refuse workIn this issue, we focus on a question posed by a subscriber to the Behaviors and Classroom Management Blog. You can contact us with your question and you just might see it featured in a future issues. You can email me, Ruth Herman Wells, Director of Youth Change Professional Development Workshops or click Live Help on the bottom of any page on our website

Suzanne is a teacher who emailed me for help teaching her students who are work refusers, but unlike most students who try to do nothing in class, some of Suzanne's students are becoming violent about it. If you are used to students who are more passive about not wanting to work in school, you may find it a whole different ball game when working with students who act out while making their refusal known.

Here is what Suzanne wrote:

"At our school we have been having difficulty dealing with children who when faced with work will throw things, or act out in very dramatic ways. How do you go about helping the child while protecting the education of your other students?"

 

Students Who Refuse to Work

2 Types, 2 Sets of Strategies
 

At the risk of a bit of over-simplification, there are probably at least two major reasons why student will act-out dramatically when faced with work. You can't necessarily use the same interventions with different types of work refusers. Well, you can use the same interventions but they won't work equally well with different kinds of students. Just as you can't use a single math text book or reading technique with every student, you can't rely on a single style of intervention, consequence or talk to work with the variety of students who refuse assignments.
 

student won't work in classStudent #1
 

Here is the first type of student who refuses to work in class. If you've been a longtime subscriber to The Behavior and Classroom Management Blog, you should find yourself on familiar turf and ready to move forward. This youngster is a student who we've covered many times before in many articles in this blog, so we'll just touch on this student this time, then move on to the second reason. If you want to review some of the previous articles on work refusal, check out our huge assortment of free educational professional development articles on the topic in our Educational Articles Index.

One reason that students may engage in extreme behaviors when faced with a task, is that the student has a mental health problem called Conduct Disorder. If you have been a subscriber to the articles  in this blog, hopefully, you remember what you learned in past issues when we covered this topic.

The key points that we hope stuck with you from reading those articles are these: Children with conduct disorders (C.D.) lack a conscience so they do what they want, when they want, to who they want. C.D.s are your most misbehaved kids so there is a chance that if someone is routinely  throwing items and is utterly unremorseful, that child could be conduct disordered. A child with C.D. can engage in serious misconduct at any time, but certainly, when faced with a distasteful task, that task can easily prompt bad behavior.

violent studentsAs you may remember, you must use a completely different set of techniques with C.D.s so the way you prevent and manage misbehavior with this portion of your students is very different from how you accomplish that goal with the rest of your group. So, Suzanne, for the possible C.D.s in your classroom, use the techniques we've offered you in previous issues. Can't locate those issues? Here again are our introductory training guides on Conduct Disorder. Want more details than offered in the two introductory articles? You can purchase our Conduct Disorders and Anti-Social Youth book, ebook, audio book or online training course to get all the information you need for this portion of your students.

As you may recall from the past issues, C.D.s are usually at least 11-14% of a typical mainstream classroom, so you can expect to always have at least a few to manage in every setting. So, it's well worth your time to have top-notch skills with this very difficult-to-manage population of students.

 

Article Continues Below

 

 

workshops on students who refuse work

 

Schedule Your On-Site Inservice Workshop Now

It's More Affordable Than You Think

Learn 100s of Strategies for Work Refusers, Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated and Withdrawn Students

1.800.545.5736 or Email

One Click Can Solve It All

 

 

Article Continues Here

 

students refuse workStudent #2
 

The second major explanation why a student will chronically and violently refuse work is that the youngster is overwhelmed, frustrated, tired, upset, or hoping to avoid the chore. This youngster is like a pressure cooker who can explode. Years ago, families more thoroughly and reliably taught their offspring how to behave and manage frustration, and students' conduct reflected that.

With this group of misbehaved youngsters, you will have to teach them the self-management techniques that they did not master at home. You will also need to equip them with the motivation and attitudes that would foster better conduct. Our Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop and books have hundreds of strategies on self-control, accepting assignments, and anger management. We have included a few of our favorites below:
 

Your Mama 101


If you don't have a class with the title of "Your Mama 101," then maybe now is the time to start one. This class can teach youngsters all the skills they need to manage their anger and aggression.

What are some of your youngsters learning about anger control at home and in the community? At home, anger may be screamed away, or drugged away, or dishes may be thrown. None of those behaviors are acceptable at your site, yet that is all the anger management that some children know. Until you teach your students to manage their anger, many will continue to be unable to behave in a socially acceptable manner.

Even though teaching anger control perhaps should not have to be your job, you may want to make it your job. Until you do teach those skills, you may find that there are no consequences, no rules– no anything– that will work as a substitute. You wouldn't expect math skills until you taught those skills. Similarly, you can't shouldn't expect anger control skills until you teach those skills. While, in theory, you can expect or want any behaviors you wish, until you teach students how to perform those behaviors, you probably won't see those behaviors.

Here's an example of a ready-to-use intervention that helps younger students who often lack patience and act out aggressively when frustrated. Use this silly mnemonic device to gently help students use more socially acceptable ways to attempt to decline a task: "Just say 'no,' don't throw."
 

Find Work With a Temper Like That


This strategy remains a favorite at our live workshops, so we will include it here. Ask your students to name all the jobs that they can do and throw things (or lose control) whenever they want. There are none. When your students figure that out, ask them if they will ever need to work.
 

Pro-Active Skill Training


Don't wait for the book to sail through the air. Pro-actively teach all your students the self-control skills they need. For Suzanne's situation, she could teach students what to say when they don't want to do a task, they don't know how to do it, or they need help.

You may assume that most children are able to say "I don't want to do it," which is a much better way of communicating than throwing a book. Be careful about that assumption. Children are not little adults. They may not know how to properly say that they'd prefer to forgo the chore. Give them the sentences they need so they can properly communicate with you.

Be very sure to address all three of the circumstances mentioned above. We recommend that the sentence begins with "yes." For example, you could give your students sentences such as "Yes, I know you want me to read that story aloud but I don't want to do it."

We recommend the "yes" as adults often appreciate that initial gesture of willingness, and including that word may make that sentence work successfully with a wide variety of teachers, coaches, parents, etc. rather than just with you.

Many teachers post their recommended three sentences on the wall of the classroom. A sample sentence: "Yes, I will do it but I really don't want to." Be sure to cover all the skills needed to manage work in your setting, not just the three circumstances noted here. So, for example, be sure to cover managing boredom during tasks; what to do when you are upset; managing frustration during a task; what to do when you hate a task; and so on. Remember: Any area that you do not cover, will remain a problem.

 

Talk About Work Refusal


Chances are that you have never even discussed with your students how often they should decline work. That means that your students are expected to adhere to a standard that you have never quantified for them. Assist students to identify how often work refusal is permitted each day in the work world, then help them establish a standard that is fairly similar. Now, your students have a quantifiable standard, and appreciate the logic behind it.
 

studentPain Delay


When you give an assignment to a youngster, no child will ever reply: "I watched Dad beat my Mom last night. Science just doesn't seem very relevant right now. Can I postpone this task?" Few youngsters will neatly identify their pain and request an accommodation so you have to provide them a way to gain relief on days that they are particularly troubled. Without a socially appropriate way to gain relief, some troubled students will act out.

Here are some methods that can eliminate the need to act out. For older kids who you suspect may face serious problems, allow them to identify "good work days" and "bad work days."

For younger children, you can make a mock- up of a traffic light, and have red be a "bad work day," yellow would be an "okay work day," and green is a "good work day."

If you worry that distressed students may take advantage of your accommodations, don't worry. You'll become their life line, and they won't jeopardize that connection. They will work as hard as they can on days they are able. Isn't that really all you should ask of a child who lives in pain?

 

Article Permalink
https://www.youthchg.com/students-who-wont-do-their-work

  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


 

School Counseling Tips: How to Talk to Children About Death

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

School Counseling Tips:
How to Talk to Children About Death
 

 

 

school counselingSchool counseling is a tough job to do. As a school counselor, you must be ready to help with virtually any social, emotional, family or academic problem that can arise. School counselors cover it all, from bullying to depression, from domestic violence to drugs, from college planning to mental health issues.

School counselors see plenty of the mental health issues that are tough to manage. However, talking to kids about death can be a task school counselors face at least once or more each school year. Having that conversation probably ranks pretty high for difficult, delicate subjects to focus on with children and teens in school counseling sessions. There's certainly the potential to ease or avoid pain, to enlighten, even elevate a child, but there is certainly the potential to confuse, worsen or cause pain, or even frighten or damage a youngster.

Hello from Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I am a national expert on helping troubled and challenged children and teens. I have written dozens of books, am an adjunct professor for two universities. I also write a column for a national print education magazine, and I train thousands of teachers, counselors and parents annually throughout North American.school counseling conference I also raised two children who turned out to be a social worker and a special ed teacher so I guess I can walk the walk and not just talk the talk.

School counseling is the lifeline for many troubled, disturbed and challenged students. For some of these youngsters, the quality of the school counseling that a child receives can be the single most important force determining whether a child sinks or swims, struggles or thrives. With that in mind, I offer this quick how-to guide to use in counseling, teaching, parenting and elsewhere.

One of my specialty areas is helping children and teens cope with loss. The truth is that children are not uniform creatures and there is no one single right way to talk to a child about death and dying. Having said that, I can offer a few guidelines that are easy for adults to remember and use. I have crafted these how-to steps to be useable by school counselors, teachers, juvenile court staff, social workers and other professionals but these tips have been written to be readily accessible by parents and non-professionals too.

school counselorFirst, use actual life events as your jumping off point rather than mechanically or artificially stage a conversation. Parents can start the conversation as young as they wish, but around 2 years old is a general suggestion for where to start. So, Mom can say "Please don't stomp that bug because he could end up dead," and then be ready to explain what "dead" means. The explanation of "dead" must be concrete enough that a small child can understand it so pairing the discussion with the concept of "all gone" works great. Use an object and hide it to teach "all gone."


Article Continues Below

 

teacher workshop

 

Schedule Your On-Site Inservice Workshop Now

It's More Affordable Than You Think

Learn 100s of Strategies for Work Refusers, Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated and Withdrawn Students

1.800.545.5736 or Email

One Click Can Solve It All

 

 

Article Continues Here

student assistanceSecond, don't worry too much if the child gets the concept of death the first times it's discussed. You're building up to the a more complete understanding as the child ages and develops. Ideally, Moms and Dads should let the child take the lead, and seek questions that should be gently answered. This is an incremental process. If a death occurs in the life of a young child before the concept has been successfully communicated, then aim to give pieces of the concept bit by bit. Give too much and the child will get overwhelmed and their brain can stop absorbing new information on the topic.

Third, children's brains aren't fully developed so abstract, non-concrete concepts can be confusing. Let them use their frame of reference like having a "ghost dog" that a child imagines after the death of a beloved pet. Creations like "ghost dog" are completely normal and actually quite helpful. It takes the whole huge idea of death– something even us adults struggle with– and cuts it down to be a bit more pint-size. Parents can help their children think up their own creations to bridge the gap if their children don't devise their own "ghost dog." For example, a child might create drawings of the departed pet as a way to remember it, and let it "live" on– if only as their picture on the refrigerator.

student mental healthFourth, older children and teens do grasp the concept of death and how finite it is. However their immature brains can struggle to cope when there is a loss. For teens who do have good abstract thinking abilities, the focus should be especially tuned into how the older child or teen is coping. Counselors, teachers, school staff and parents shouldn't just judge the book by its cover, and should be alert for acting-out or more covert acting-in behaviors like substance abuse, self-endangering or problems in school.

Finally, loss is part of life, and is just another difficult job that should fall to parents. Waiting to address the subject until the child is older is never a good plan. It will always be tougher for a school counselor to step in late in the game than for a parent to be gently imparting information all along the way.

For parents who are unsure of when to introduce talking about death, sooner is better. So long as they are gentle and let the child take the lead, while observing for distress, it is always better for parents to tell the truth about life– even when the truth is tough to take.

 

Article Permalink
https://www.youthchg.com/school-counseling

  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Our Most Amazing Motivational Strategies For Your Most Unmotivated Students

 

teacher blog


Our Most Amazing
Motivational Strategies
For Your Most Unmotivated Students

 


 

Chances are you have way too many unmotivated and apathetic students in your classroom again this year. You've probably noticed that conventional methods of inspiring students to care about school, tend to routinely fail, especially with your most unmotivated youngsters.

workshop trainer Ruth Herman WellsI'm trainer and consultant, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. As a workshop instructor, I read thousands of evaluations every year. I know that this magazine issue has some of the best student motivational strategies that exist, because that's what our workshop participants note on our seminar evaluation form. Hopefully, you'll agree that these devices are powerful interventions to turnaround even the most unmotivated students.

Grad Mag:
For Students Who Know That
Life Without a Diploma
Can Be a Drag

Classroom Motivation PosterTo reach the most students possible, it's critical that you use a variety of styles of intervention. Not all students learn best with their ears, for example. This motivational intervention is geared for students who respond best to active, tactile activities.

Intervention: Ask students to create "Grad Mag," a magazine that touts the benefits of graduating high school. Poster #283 provides an example. Students can use conventional art supplies or computers to create their magazine. Prior to starting on the art work, allow students to research the benefits and hazards of getting a high school diploma. They can consider variables like income, type of job, and job status.

If a group or classroom of students is involved in this project, students can be assigned to make different components of the magazine, such as the cover, back page, table of contents, and so on. Once the elements are completed, the magazine can be assembled, reviewed and discussed.

Indirect motivational methods such as this strategy, may pack a bigger punch than more straight-forward, verbal approaches proclaiming the importance of education and a diploma. While it might be easier for you to present this point of view instead of having your students research and create it, you will find this method to be far more effective, especially with oppositional youngsters.


Man vs Machine

poster to motivate studentsPower up your students to care about school by showing them how automation is quickly taking over entry level jobs, as well as many jobs that have been available to people without a high school diploma.

Intervention: To implement this intervention, use a voice that sounds like a robot, or alternatively, record your voice using a device to make it sound robotic. If you search for "make my voice sound like a robot," you'll see plenty of options. Say in a robotic voice: "Any job you can do without skills, a robot can do better." If you prefer, you can substitute the word "diploma" or "math" for the word "skills."

Next, discuss with your students why employers might much prefer virtual employees to real ones. Include answers like "robots never have to take lots of bathroom breaks" and "robots know how to do math." Poster #148, pictured at right provides illustration.

 

Education:
Now, More Important Than the Air You Breathe

motivational posterIt may be a sad commentary on our culture, but it is probably necessary to sell and market the value of school and education to students who have not discovered that truth for themselves. If you have disinterested, unmotivated students, part of your job must include convincing those youngsters that school and education will be absolutely essential to their survival.

Intervention: If you look at Poster #168, you can see that the word "diploma" is literally made of money. That is a concept that can reach some of your most uninterested students: that schools offer free diplomas that are made of money. One estimate is that high school grads out-earn dropouts by $329,000 per lifetime. Ask your students to estimate what an extra $329,000 per person –$658,000 per couple– could buy. Also ask students to choose whether they would prefer to have $329,000 more or less than everyone else.

 

There's No Excuse
For Dropping Out

Classroom PosterDon't let students' unrealistic excuses ever justify leaving school. A classic reason some boys offer for quitting school is that they plan to be famous sports stars so they will never need an education.

Intervention: Open students' eyes to the truth. Poster #170 illustrates that the NFL, NBA and MLB all want players to have a diploma. There are plenty of other types of excuses so be sure to confront whatever untrue explanations your students present. In our books, we have interventions for virtually all of these excuses, including "I'm going on welfare," "I'll marry a wealthy man," and "I'm going to win the lottery."
 

 

 

  •  


    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

    Subscribe Unsubscribe/Change Subscription
    Contact Us*  *Not for Unsubscribing
     

    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.