Free Worksheets with Student Behavior Strategies

 

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4 Free Worksheets with

Student Behavior Strategies 
 

 


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4 Free Worksheets with
Student Behavior Strategies

behavior strategies workshopYou’re going to love the four free student behavior strategies worksheets included in this edition of the Problem Student Problem-Solver Magazine. Hello from Youth Change Professional Development Workshops Director, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. We’ve loaded this issue with some of our very best behavior strategies for student problems like poor motivation and aggressiveness, and there is even a worksheet for girls who are not very motivated or interested in STEM classes.

These behavior improvement worksheets give you innovative, more effective strategies, and are taken from our in-person Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop, Online Breakthrough Workshop and Breakthrough ebooks and books. Our workshop is scheduled for Seattle in just about a month from now, on April 18-19, 2019. Scholarship work-study slots are still open if you are on a budget. Grab a scholarship by calling 503.982.4220 and in 5 minutes you’ll be signed up to sign away your worst student behavior management problems. The Breakthrough Workshop is designed to give you 200 solutions to make classroom behavior management stop being a battle and start being a success.

SEL social emotional learningMotivational
 Behavior Strategies Worksheet

This motivational behavior strategies worksheet for your students is a clever way to build motivation. Fortunately, more motivated students often translates to improved classroom management. The worksheet is a simple multiple choice that you can use as part of a group discussion or it also works well for use individually with students. Click here to get this behavior strategies handout in PDF format. It’s ready to print and use right away. It’s taken from our Education: Don’t Start the Millennium Without It Book.

 

 

 

STEM motivational worksheetBuild Girls’ Interest in STEM Courses
 Behavior Strategies Worksheet

This unconventional worksheet is so silly and funny, that you will practically sneak information into your students’ brains. Designed specifically for use with girls and young women, this lively worksheet confronts some of the stereotypes that can cause young females to initially feel uninterested in STEM courses. But, STEM courses are hugely important to future career success so it’s critical to break down those barriers and successfully motivate girls to consider giving STEM courses more of a chance. If you prefer to have the poster version of this fun intervention, it’s our very popular Poster #415; click here. To pick up the free PDF behavior strategies worksheet version, click here.

 

 

Article Continues Below

 


 

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Seattle Breakthrough Strategies Workshop

Behavior and Budget Problems Stop Here!

 

Now $119 for 2 Days, $90 for 1 Day

Coupon Code: 30% OFF Seattle 2019

Valid through 04-17-19

Register   Workshop Information

 


 

 

 

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Inservice Workshop Now

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Article Continues Here

behavior strategiesReduce Aggressiveness
 Behavior Strategies Worksheet

Here are some lively, creative behavior strategies to help improve your classroom management results. You can help students improve their demeanor and conduct with specific training techniques like this sample strategy. Obviously, this one behavior strategy worksheet can’t instantly change students but using lots of interventions like this will make a big difference over time. You don’t have to just live with students’ bad behavior when you regularly use behavior strategies like this example. This worksheet is intended for use with groups so you can help students understand how others see their behavior vs. their own self-perception. Many aggressive youngsters don’t realize the serious impact of their conduct on others. Gaining this insight can help some students to become more willing to work on behavior improvement. This behavior improvement strategies worksheet is from our Temper and Tantrum Tamers lesson book that is offered in both ebook and book format. To pick up the free student aggressiveness management worksheet, click here.

 

behavior strategies for temper tantrumsReduce Temper Tantrums
 Behavior Strategies Worksheet

If you have ever tried to get a student to accept help to stop aggressiveness, violence or temper tantrums, you know that many youngsters have little interest in changing. This worksheet is designed to start the process of students reconsidering their resistance by helping them realize that their acting-out will be a lifelong impediment and a huge obstacle to many of the things they may want to do throughout life. By helping students gain motivation to change, change is more likely to occur. This single intervention lesson will not be sufficient to engender change but it makes a great first step. If you keep using intervention strategies like those in this handout, you may actually begin to see improvement in behavior over time. Changing problem behavior is always going to work better than relying on consequences alone because consequences aren’t very good at compensating for missing self-control skills. That’s why behavior worksheets like this sample can generate far superior results than sanctions alone. This worksheet is from our popular Temper and Tantrum Tamer book or ebook. Pick up this ready-to-use temper tantrum improvement worksheet here.

 

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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
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What Works with Students Who Avoid or Refuse to Work

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

What Works with Students

Who Avoid or Refuse to Work

 

 


classroom management help

classroom management help

classroom management help

 

expert classroom management toolsNext Live Workshops:

 

30% OFF!

Seattle

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Behavior and Budget Problems Stop Here!

Now $119 for 2 Days, $90 for 1 Day
Coupon Code: 30% OFF Seattle 2019 | Valid through 04-17-19
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What Works with Students

 

Who Avoid or Refuse to Work

 

work refusal articleThey are without a doubt among the hardest students to reach and teach. I’m talking about students who avoid school tasks or refuse to work entirely. Some may become almost mute, others won’t even make eye contact, but the common thread is that the student is drastically underperforming when it comes to accepting, completing and returning assignments. If you’re like most teachers, you never had a class in college called Introduction to Helping Students Who Avoid Work, but you probably wish there had been lots of courses exactly like that. You don’t have to go back to college. Help is right here in this how-to article.

If you want even more strategies and information that can produce improved results from students who avoid or refuse school work, come to our Seattle Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop on April 18-19, 2019 and get hours of detailed, step-by-step instruction on how to maximize your impact on these difficult to teach students. Hello from the course instructor, Youth Change Professional Development Workshops director, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. That’s a picture of me teaching in Seattle a couple years ago. I hope to see you back there in April when you can actually list out for me the student problems you want me to cover. You’ll leave with 200 use-now, more effective strategies.

 

Innovative Strategies for Students

 

Who Avoid or Refuse to Work

students who don't finish their work

 

Stop the Power Struggle

Most teachers know that is very easy to end up in a power struggle with students who don’t do much school work or none at all. As a mental health professional, I really need to point out that no adult ever won a power struggle and not adult ever will. So, if you have to admit that you do feel a bit like you are in a power struggle with some of your work refusing students, Step #1 has to be to acknowledge that to the youngster, declare a truce and back off for a moment.

Here’s why many or most students refuse work: Much of the time, these children and teens are terribly weighed down by some type of problem. Perhaps a parent is violent or missing. Perhaps they have an undiagnosed or diagnosed learning disorder that makes school work miserable. Maybe they are distracted or unmotivated. In this short article, we’ll focus on the first students mentioned above, the ones that are struggling with some type of emotional, social or learning problem. There are dozens of  free expert, how-to articles our site covering poor motivation that you can read. Building motivation in work refusing students can be a good help but if a student is too busy trying to stay awake after all-night domestic violence, motivation is only going to take you so far. Instead, being sensitive to what the child may be living through, may be a much more effective approach. Remember: You may be the only sane, sober adult in some students’ orbit. You definitely don’t want to add burdens. You want to be on their side as much as you can. Stopping any power struggles and explicitly talking about how to manage the work refusal is a great place to begin again.

students who don't finish their work

 

Ask the Expert

Who you think just might be the best expert to help you figure out how to best work with a student who is avoiding or refusing to work? That student. No one else may know why they are doing so little, so ask then listen carefully to the response you get when you ask for the reason for not wanting to start or complete tasks. If the student answers that they don’t know why, then ask “If you did know why, what might it be?” If that unexpected strategy fails, switch the focus to a friend or someone in popular culture and ask the student why that person might refuse to work. That switch may yield important clues and by shifting the focus to someone else, you may get more truth than the student would tell you otherwise.

Whether or not you succeed at getting more information, use the students’ expertise to improve the situation. Ask the student to help you understand what to do and what not to do to assist them. Tell the student you are on their side and don’t want to add to any problems they may already have. Tell the student that with their guidance, perhaps they could do less work on days they are struggling and more work on days they feel more able. Next, cooperatively develop a step by step plan that features tiny, tiny increases. If you aim for bigger increases, that creates the possibility of a big setback if the student fails. If the increase is tiny, and the student is saying that’s “too easy,” that’s perfect. You want the student to have some small successes but without the risk of a big fail. When this youngster fails, they often disappear from school or lose a lot of ground in other areas. This student is all about anxiety. Everything you do must decrease the anxiety because when the student experiences anxiety, that’s when they refuse work or disappear from school or class.

students who don't finish their work

 

It’s About Control

Typically, students who refuse to work are very anxious. They are struggling to cope. When they refuse to work, they are trying to take control over one of the few things in their world that they have any say over at all. You can struggle with them over the control but that is never going to go well. Instead, hand the control to them and you will see improved results. I suggest explicitly talking about control and anxiety with them, and reassuring them that you don’t want to add to their worries. Tell them you want to give them as much control over their work as possible. That can help them be a little less anxious. Their anxiety is the best guide. When it is high, reduce expectations. When it is relatively low, incrementally increase expectations for work. Let them know that you will give them slack when they are struggling, but in return, ask if they could work as hard as they can on days that they are feeling a bit better.

Be sure that these youngsters understand that they are going to need the skills taught in school, and if you two work together, they can accomplish that in a way that doesn’t put any strain on them. Once you are both on the same side, a general relaxation can occur and improvement can happen– but only to a certain extent. For example, students who are awake much of the night because their home is a battleground, will be limited in how much they will be able to do with little sleep and lots of worries.

Article Continues Below

 


 

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Behavior and Budget Problems Stop Here!

 

Now $119 for 2 Days, $90 for 1 Day

Coupon Code: 30% OFF Seattle 2019

Valid through 04-17-19

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Students Who Refuse Work, Are Violent,
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Article Continues Here

students who don't finish their work

 

To Push or Not to Push?

Do I push students who do nothing in school, or do I back off? That’s the million dollar question, isn’t it? You may feel that when it comes to students who refuse to work or avoid assignments, it’s lose-lose. If you push, these students tend to double down on their resistance. Many stop showing up for school or class. If you don’t push, then the fear is that you are not educating these youngsters at all. Here’s the solution to this mystery: Both pushing and not pushing result in big fails. “To push or not to push” isn’t even the right question. The better question is “What should I do to get more results from these youngsters? In our workshops, we spend hours answering this question. In this brief how-to article, I can’t fit in the wealth of techniques I’ll be giving in Seattle in April in our Breakthrough Strategies Workshop, but here’s a few key pro tips:

As a mental health professional, I can assure you that typically many students who routinely and seriously refuse or avoid work, are facing some type of emotional, social or behavioral issue that impedes their functioning. Even so, despite the significant (but often not readily apparent or visible) challenges these students may have, most of these youngsters usually have days that are better or worse. On days that this student is struggling, reduce your expectations. On days that this student appears to be doing a bit better, increase your expectations. For example, a girl’s dad is on the road driving a long haul truck 4 days a week. You may notice her functioning is markedly improved when dad is on the road. You may notice the girl’s functioning nose dives when dad returns. That’s the time to cut her slack. Make specific agreements with students that reflect this type of plan.

Students tend to be really grateful to know that you are not going to cause more burdens to be added to their shoulders at times they are already carrying a very heavy load. The upshot is that now that there is no more power struggling over classroom work, and the student realizes that you understand their situation, they tend to work as hard as they can on the days they are able. They also tend to develop a lot of loyalty for you and that helps fuel their desire to work when they aren’t weighed down by whatever they may be going through. As an aside, I have to be sure to remind you to be sure to report any concrete indications of abuse or similar, as you are required by your site.

students who don't finish their work

 

Your Goal

The goal for students who refuse to work can and should be shared with these youngsters. That means you will be sensitive to what trauma, crisis, disability, emotional problem or plight the child is dealing with, but not at the expense of education. There is a balance between being sensitive to what the child may be living through and your mission to educate. If you can find that middle ground between those two parameters, you can really maximize the results these students can achieve.

No, you don’t need to worry about these children taking advantage of you if you are using this methods with students who have a lot of anxiety. That is key. These methods will fail with other populations of students. These intervention methods are designed only for use with students who are anxious or struggling with problems like trauma, domestic violence or loss. Dealing with the anxiety and whatever is causing it, takes so most of this students’ energy and resources. They don’t have much energy or interest left to plot and scheme how to take advantage of your reasonableness and kindness so being manipulated while using these methods is not normally a concern with the target population. Yes, manipulation would occur if you employ these strategies with populations they were not intended for.

If you are using this method with truly anxious and troubled students, they are much more likely to develop enormous loyalty towards you versus expend energy to exploit the accommodations you provide. You may be the only kind, humane adult they interact with. They are unlikely to jeopardize their lifeline. That’s why the best goal is to help them learn to work as hard as they can on days that they’re able. Hearing about that goal can reduce the power struggles and bring relief to children who are awash in pain.

 

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    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Must-Know Strategies for the 5 Most Common Student Mental Health Problems

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Must-Know Strategies

for the

5 Most Common

Student Mental Health Problems

 
 

 

student mental healthThere is no question that you are seeing many more student mental health problems than ever before. Many educators typically lack extensive or even basic training on student mental health problems and end up lacking many or all of the honed, more effective strategies and tools that juvenile mental health professionals have developed. This how-to article for educators and other non-mental health professionals is designed to remedy that oversight as much as possible given the limited space we have for a complex topic. This Top 5 list of student mental health problems is based on the feedback of the teachers, principals, school counselors and special educators that have attended our in-person Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshops recently. (You can attend too as our next live conference is coming up soon in Seattle on April 18-19, 2019 — and, even better, our conference scholarships are still open! Just call 800.545.5736 to grab one now.)

Hello from Youth Change Director Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I have spent my career teaching about key student mental health problems and diagnoses to educators and other non-mental health professionals. I am hoping that you will be able to immediately use the information included in this important article for teachers, principals, special educators and other non-mental health professionals who work with children and teens. Even though non-mental health professionals can’t diagnose, the how-to article below is intended to give you the language to better understand, manage and communicate about your students who are struggling with their emotions and/or thoughts.

 

Must-Know Strategies

for the

5 Most Common

Student Mental Health Problems

 

student with conduct disorder1. CONDUCT DISORDER

If you don’t know this disorder backwards and forwards and inside and out, then you are a vulnerable target for your most seriously acting-out students. In our workshops, we spend hours and hours on this disorder because the student who has this disorder is normally by far your most impossible-to-manage student– and this disorder is very common. Affecting an estimated 11-14% of your students, this disorder means that the child or teen is wired differently than other students. Lacking remorse, empathy and relationship capacity, this child’s signature is his extreme acting-out. That was not a misplaced pronoun. “He” is very often a he, not a she. Girls don’t very commonly have this disorder but they can have it, and when they do, their behavior is often beyond extreme.

Here are some passable examples of this disorder from popular culture: J.R. Ewing from the TV show Dallas, Sid the boy in the first Toy Story movie, and Eddie Haskell from Leave It to Beaver. Everyday, ordinary interventions always fail with this population and generally make the situation worse. That means that your go-to interventions that work well or okay with other students, routinely let you down with this population. That’s why working successfully with children who have or may have conduct disorder requires that you use specialized interventions that are different from what you normally use. Since this youngster lacks a heart and relationship capacity, strategies that require empathy or compassion will always fail. There is no way I can capture this problem for you in this tiny space but there are countless free articles on our site to guide you, plus online courses and books. Go to our free, introductory Conduct Disorder mental health article to learn more about this common, serious disorder and to discover the kinds of strategies that must be used– and those that must never be used– with this very difficult-to-control student.

 

student mental health problem

2. CLINICAL DEPRESSION

Sure, lots and lots of adolescents are depressed but that’s not clinical depression. Clinical depression is more serious, more prolonged and more difficult than ordinary adolescent angst. For all mental health diagnoses, a mental health or health professional is needed to diagnose, but whether or not you can diagnose, you can certainly adjust how you work with children and teens who appear to be clinically depressed. The top go-to step for seriously depressed children and teens is working with  a mental health clinician. Next, after that, there are three major strategies that have been shown to be effective. First, depressed students often can benefit from having the chance to vent their concerns. Almost any adult can do a least some listening. Second, exercise, mindfulness training and meditation offer depressed students really useful tools. Along the same line, teaching students how to better manage their upsetting thoughts, can have a lot of value. The third strategy to consider is to arrange with the family for an anti-depressant but there is a risk of self-harm for this option, and this option can be difficult to set up. Studies suggest all three methods together work better than any of the strategies separately.

Depression needs to be taken seriously and it can definitely spur students to behaviors that are very concerning. As a society we are more attuned to paying attention to acting out, not giving as much notice to the more subtle, less obvious, less overt, more quiet phenomena of depression. Don’t let that cultural norm prevent you from devoting time to students whose behavior may be acceptable but their emotional functioning may still be of great concern. Depressed students are just as worthy and needing of your attention as students who command your attention with acting-out behavior. Read more about how to help students who face clinical depression in our free how-to articles.

 

Article Continues Below

 

 

classroom management workshops

Schedule
Your On-Site
Inservice Workshop Now

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Article Continues Here

 

bipolar disorder

3. BIPOLAR DISORDER

I am including this student mental health problem here not because it is a very common disorder; it’s actually not as common as many other childhood and teen disorders. I am including it because so many of the teachers and principals that I see in my workshops and at conferences, are confused about what this disorder is all about. This disorder used to be called Manic-Depression and I think that old title was really helpful to remind non-mental health workers what this problems is all about. This disorder means that the child or teen gets really depressed then suddenly starts being out-of-control with little in between. They go from 0 miles an hour to 150 miles an hour in a flash. It is a very unpleasant, distressing disorder that can be extremely hard to manage unless the family gets a diagnosis and follows through very carefully on medication. Medication is the first, second and third best strategy. That is my silly way of saying that medication is just incredibly important.

I’m not sure if there is anything that even comes close to being as helpful as meds, but skill training can be very useful. The skill training must focus on teaching the child to take their meds. Skill training also needs to prepare the child and family to cope effectively with any issues that they may develop about the medication or its side effects as regularly taking medicine as directed is crucial to getting and keeping this youngster stabilized. When the child is unmedicated or missing doses, their manic behavior can quickly get very extreme and inappropriate, even illegal. If you are not a mental health professional and you think you are working with a child who could have this serious disorder, you need to alert your supervisor at once and hopefully you will be able to arrange a thorough evaluation. This disorder typically is found to start when the person is a young adult or older adult but it can occur earlier.

 

 

school mental health4. OPPOSITIONAL DEFIANT DISORDER

This disorder looks at first to be just like conduct disorder but that is not a very accurate perception. The difference between conduct disorder (C.D.) and oppositional defiant disorder (O.D.D.) may not be readily obvious but it is incredibly important. Treatment for O.D.D. varies dramatically from that offered for conduct disorder. While students with O.D.D. and C.D. typically both misbehave and can be aggressive and non-compliant, the behavior of the student with C.D. is normally far more extreme, frequent and damaging to people, animals and property. While that difference is important, the really important difference is that the child with C.D. lacks a conscience and that is a huge problem. Lacking a conscience, relationship capacity and empathy for others, the student with C.D. can track towards crime and other behaviors that society doesn’t permit.

The student with O.D.D. is believed to have a conscience, but that conscience isn’t doing very much to help. A good conscience can provide very good brakes for bad behavior. Absent that conscience, a child will do what they want, when they want, to who they want. That is precisely what makes children with C.D. so potentially dangerous and so very hard to manage in any environment. Being diagnosed with O.D.D. is far more hopeful than being diagnosed with C.D. as the hope is that if that conscience can be better activated, the student can behave better.

While both sets of students need extensive training to manage their fist, mouth and actions, the student with O.D.D. has a far more optimistic prognosis. The student diagnosed with C.D. will never learn to care about others and is pretty much always going to be reined in using consequences and possibly rewards. The student with O.D.D. can really do very well once their conscience is more dominant and they have mastered how to be a civilized, law-abiding, compliant human. If you are not a mental health professional, be sure to try to arrange a thorough mental health evaluation so you know whether you’re working with an apple or an onion. While these two disorders can look somewhat the same, you have to be very careful to proceed differently depending on which disorder is actually occurring in a student.

 

trauma informed5. STUDENTS WITH TRAUMA

Unlike the previous items, this issue is not a mental health diagnostic category. However, “trauma-informed” practice has been a prominent concept lately so that combined with the huge frequency of trauma, led me to include this issue here. If you work with kids, you are working with some youngsters who have faced, or are facing traumatic events such as abuse, violence, abandonment or crises. Students facing trauma who are evaluated by a mental health clinician, can receive varying mental health diagnoses (like depression and PTSD, for example), but it is that common thread of trauma that I wanted to address.

Students who are traumatized often have little energy for school or whatever service your site offers. These youngsters need help from a mental health professional but they also need to not face more unnecessary stress in your environment– even when they don’t do much school work, are selectively mute and uninvolved in activities. The key here, regardless of the diagnosis, is to strike a balance between being sensitive to what this child may be living through and your mission. When the child is more functional, increase expectations a bit but if the increase sends the child into a tailspin, then return to the last level where the youngster was successful. When the child is less functional, decrease expectations a bit and work cooperatively to maximize the child’s involvement but without adding to the child’s already heavy load.

Many of your work refusing students are children who are coping with traumatic events. After enduring serious incidents of trauma, children may be diagnosed with PTSD, Post-Traumatic Syndrome Disorder, which is a very concerning diagnosis. These youngsters, in particular, need your site to be a haven, not more misery, so working with these children very carefully and delicately is strongly recommended. Children who have lived through much horror at a young age and lack resilience, are very brittle and easily broken. The bottom line is that you  may be the only sane, sober adult in the child’s universe. If instead of being helpful, you are yet another harmful adult, you can help track the child in the wrong direction. Conversely, if you offer help, empathy, guidance and a moderate, unstressful intervention plan, you can often engineer some progress, albeit slow.

 

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    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Teacher Professional Development Formats: A Fast Reference Guide

 

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Teacher Professional Development Formats:

A Fast Reference Guide

 


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Teacher Professional Development Course Formats:

A Fast Reference Guide

 

teacher professional development classesIt can be confusing to sign up for teacher professional development classes today because course formats have evolved into a wide array of choices. You may come to find that you can’t fluently speak the new language of professional development. Here at Youth Change Professional Development Workshops, we get lots of questions like “How does an online class work?” and “What’s the difference between a streaming and recorded class?” In this high tech era, professional course delivery options are many, and it can be hard to keep up.

In this quick reference guide, I will run through the most common questions we get and do my best to help you nail down all the terminology so you can make informed professional development course selections. Hi from Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. That’s me in the image at right, as shown in our video Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Online Class. I’m a course presenter, keynote speaker and the Director of Youth Change Professional Development Workshops. I hope our quick manual will be a good guide to staying current with all the terminology that you need to know to take full advantage of today’s ever-changing teacher professional development choices.

 

Professional Development Class Terminology

teacher class management

 

In-Person Professional Development Classes

Think of these courses as analog or legacy professional development classes. This is the old school or old style, conventional method of training. You show up at selected site and hear and see the speaker live. You know this format. Examples of live courses include our professional development classes (click) coming soon to Portland and Seattle. Live courses are interactive and you can usually ask questions and exert some control over the content. On the negative side, you have to get to the event site regardless of weather, traffic or competing demands.

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Online Professional Development Classes

This term obviously applies to professional development classes delivered via the internet, but the term can include an assortment of formats, all delivered online. When someone uses the term “online class,” they usually mean that the course is a pre-recorded video. Usually, the video will play just like any video you find on the internet, and you can fast forward, stop, rewind and save the video to watch at a later date. But, there are other kinds of online professional development classes. You can see PDFs, audiobooks and ebooks used as online classes. Instead of watching a video, you read an ebook or PDF, or you might listen to an audiobook. “Online class” can also be used to describe another format that varies a bit from video, the Powerpoint presentation. Usually, the Powerpoint presentation is automated and plays like a video. It may even be a video but instead of viewing a class or lecture as you might during a video, you see only or mostly slides that advance on their own. Typically this format does permit you to stop, fast forward, rewind and stop the class, and return to it later.

Not everyone learns well from online professional development. You have to have discipline or motivation to sit hours watching a screen. Most online professional development classes will play on most any internet-connected device but it can be trying to watch a 10 hour course on your little cell phone. These courses are all pre-recorded so you can’t ask questions or control the content of the class at all. There may or may not be a mechanism to reach out to the instructor. On the plus side, you can take classes while you jog on a treadmill or eat breakfast. See examples of our online professional development classes. Online courses are often cheaper than in-person professional development classes but not always. Online courses may or may not hold your interest. It is a lot easier for a presenter to hold your attention when she is live, standing right in front of you versus when she is a not even a half inch tall on your little iPhone.

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Streaming Professional Development Classes

This term seems to confuse people the most. Streaming means that the professional development class is happening live in real time but that it is being delivered online. Typically, you are asked to attend by going to an online meeting website link, often a site like GotoMeeting.com. You may listen and see the professional development course by yourself perhaps using your desktop computer monitor or your phone. Another variation: You might watch on a large monitor as part of a group or staff watching together. Sometimes, you can interact with the presenter, sometimes by phone or by using a microphone. Sometimes you can only interact through a human monitor who relays questions to the instructor, or you might type your questions into your device and that is relayed to the teacher. People can participate from any geographic location all at the same time, or the professional development class can be restricted to members of a school or agency.

Streaming is great because you don’t usually have to go anywhere to attend. The cost can be less than a comparable in-person class, or the class can even be offered free. On the negative side, it can get dull pretty fast. You may find it hard to stay engaged especially if the course is many hours long. It is tough for instructors to project their personalities or a sense of excitement through a screen. If you are sitting at work, you are vulnerable to distractions and interruptions. The course may stream at a time that is not convenient to you. Interacting with the instructor may be slow or difficult. There is always the possibility of technological problems like poor quality video, poor quality sound, lost connections and so on. You can not necessarily save the streamed class, rewind, stop or pause it. You may not be able to return to it. Instructors can generally provide a recorded copy of the completed streaming class, but that is not always done. One real limitation is that you are either watching at the designated time or you miss the course. Learn about our streaming professional development classes.

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Recorded Streaming Professional Development Classes

As you read above, once the streaming professional development class is over, it is often provided to you as a recorded course. Typically, this means that the once live online course now is a recorded online course. This progression can confuse people. Here is how you can understand it: When you are filming live with your cell phone, that is similar to the class streaming live on the internet. After you finish filming live with your cell phone, you may play back what you just recorded. The recorded streaming professional development class is simply the playback of the live streaming course. Because recorded online streaming classes are fixed, you have all the drawbacks of any online course. Once the streaming stops being live, you may or may not be able to reach the instructor, ask questions or make comments.

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Other Professional Development Terms to Know

 

Here are a few more terms to be sure you remember:

Self-paced: This just means you can take the class at your own pace. Online classes and recorded streaming courses allow for this if you can stop, pause, and rewind at will. 

eLearning: This umbrella term just means that the course is delivered electronically. That could mean the professional development course is provided online, on a CD or some other electronic method.

Hybrid or Blended Learning: This is a course that uses both electronic and in-person formats, or some other combination of virtual formats. For example, a learner might take an online course then email back and forth with the instructor, or meet with the teacher in person.

Synchronous Learning: This term means that all of the students are taking the professional development class at the same time.

Asynchronous Learning: This term means that not all the students are taking the class at the same time. So, this type of learning results in a single learner interacting directly with the content via a technology system. The learner can go as fast or slow as desired instead of progressing in unison with others or as a part of a group.

Distance Learning: This is another umbrella term that encompasses almost any professional development format that is not sitting in a classroom in person on a set schedule. Online classes and streaming are both types of distance learning, for example.

 

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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
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Motivational Magic: Best Strategies to Motivate Students

 

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Motivational Magic:
The Best Strategies to Motivate Students

Includes Free Motivational Poster

 
 

 

motivate students teacher inservice workshopsIt just may be one of the biggest frustrations that teachers face. Trying to force feed education to students who aren’t interested, can feel like a losing battle.

Hello from Youth Change Director, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. That’s me in the image on the right, teaching in Seattle, Washington. In all my workshops, I always begin by asking the participants to name the top issues they face in their classrooms and throughout their school. Motivation always is on the list. Hopefully, I’ll be seeing you in Portland, Oregon next week for the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop (click) on October 12-13, 2017. Included in the 200 innovative, must-have strategies that I will give in the Portland workshop next week, I can promise dozens and dozens of strategies to motivate students of all ages. I specialize in strategies that are designed to work when conventional motivational methods have failed. So, if you work with very unmotivated students, plan to be in Portland next week. Whether or not you can attend our Portland workshop, check out the terrific strategies to motivate students that are included in this issue of our Problem Student Problem-Solver magazine. This small sampling of some of our best methods will give you the feel of the 50-70 motivational strategies I expect to teach in Portland.

 

Best Strategies to Motivate Students
 

student motivational posterGet This Motivational Poster Free!

For Use as a Poster, Worksheet or Discussion Starter

For Discouraged Students
 

Whether you use this awesome motivational poster as a wall sign, or to ignite a classroom discussion, this item is a terrific strategy to motivate students who are discouraged. It’s our Poster #328, but it also makes a good worksheet too.

Many discouraged students think that they are the only ones to struggle, fail or make mistakes. This poster can be a strong punch to the stomach, quickly convincing those youngsters that many of the world’s biggest successes floundered and got discouraged too.

To use this item as a poster, print it in color with dimensions of 11 x 17 inches. To use this item as a worksheet or discussion starter, you can print it out in any size you wish, or show the image on your projector.

 

Re-Brand and Market Education for the

Most Unmotivated Students
 

In my workshops, I often hear teachers describe teaching their students as being an awful lot like “trying to lead a horse to water and force it to drink.” After teaching a workshop in California, a teacher handed me a note. It said: “You can’t lead a horse to water and force it to drink, but you can give the horse salt and it will drink voluntarily.” That clever comment is exactly what I have been trying to teach for years about how to motivate students. You may wonder “what is the salt?” The salt is anything that lights a fire under a student. You may be thinking that many of your students claim to have no dreams, no goals, no preferences, no hope. Here’s a strategy for very negative and discouraged students for when it certainly seems that there is no human equivalent of “salt” for the unthirsty horse: Ask the student what they want to be when they grow up. If they give a useful response, then you can use that wished-for occupation as “salt” by showing how math, science, reading, writing and other educational skills will be required for that career or job.

However, for your students who profess that they have no goals and no hopes, here’s a terrific workaround. This alternative will also work well with your students who say that they want to grow up to be nothing. For students who claim that they want to “nothing,” say: “Okay, but if you did want to be something, what might it be?” For students who say that they have “no idea” what they want to be when they grow up, say” “Okay, but if you did know what you want to be when you grow up, what might it be?” This strategy allows the student to hang onto their negativity and discouragement rather than be expected to somehow jettison, overlook or override those strong, long held, negative feelings. You are in effect detouring around the negativity and discouragement instead of attempting to modify it. Attempting to modify the negativity will almost always fail but this “detour around it” tactic completely avoids the distraction of a power struggle over the student’s outlook. You have now learned that very important piece of information: what the student cares about in their future, and you can immediately use that information as “salt” as described above. You will use the students’ hopes and goals to re-brand school and education as the only path to reach their dreams.

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k12  motivational posterUnexpected Motivational Strategies

Can Produce the Best Results
 

Straight talk about motivation often produces meager results so ditch the verbiage in favor of unexpected strategies that catch students off guard and “sneak in” your motivational message about school and education. An example of these “sideways” motivational strategies is pictured at right. It’s our Poster #328. You can read its message: “Four thirds of math students don’t think they need to learn fractions.” Depending on your students’ age and skill level, they may or may not get the joke. For students who don’t understand the poster, it will be unsettling and uncomfortable and will plant the seed that “maybe, just maybe, I will need to know fractions and math.” That is the start of motivating students. You plant the seed and keep adding more and more strategies that build on that beginning. Remember: No student is going to say: “Wow! That motivational strategy really helped me to realize how much I need math!” In fact, the opposite is more likely: students will often not let on that a motivational strategy made them think, reconsider or worry about their lack of skills, or wonder if they would be unable to get by without learning fractions, and so on. Teachers plant a seed that they don’t always get to see flower and bloom. However, when you use unexpected motivational strategies, their impact is far greater than conventional interventions like just talking to the student.

 

Let Unmotivated Students Experience

Life Without Education
 

Teachers often wish they could somehow convince students that they will be incredibly vulnerable and terribly handicapped as adults if they lack education and skills. Here’s a dynamic way to let students experience the downsides of a poor education and missing skills. This activity requires a few props. You will need a large amount of small candies like M&MS or similar; a clean, 3′ by 5′ large table cloth or similar; and masking tape. Place the cloth on a table and scatter the candy all over it. Next, tape all of each student’s fingers together in random combinations using enough tape to seriously restrict each child’s use of their fingers for fine motor activities. Next, let one student at a time, or small groups of students, attempt to pick up and eat as much candy as they can in 10 seconds. Students will struggle mightily to pick up much candy and will be frustrated and impatient with their results. After each student has had a turn, discuss with the students their reactions, allowing them to emphasize how frustrating it was to try to pick up candy without full use of the fingers and hands. After students have finished venting their frustration, quietly say “Going through life without all the education you need is like trying to pick up M&Ms without use of all the fingers you need. This is what life can be like for you if you don’t get a full education.” This unexpected turn to the activity will cut through a lot of the oppositional reaction that students would have to a more straightforward, conventional approach. Students may remember this unusual activity and it can begin to chip away at the belief that “I can get by without education.”

 

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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


 

How to Improve Students’ Bad Attitudes: Strategies That Work Better & Faster

 

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How to Improve Students' Bad Attitudes:

Strategies That Work Better & Faster

 
 

 

 

How to Improve Students' Bad Attitudes:

Strategies That Work Better & Faster

student bad attitude

It's winter. It's that time of year that if the weather doesn't get to you, your students do. One huge annoyance can be the lousy attitudes that you are facing starting too early every morning to way too late each afternoon. You may even have a student or two who is so difficult and sour that you can't forget about him on that long drive home. We're ready to help. Hello from Youth Change Professional Development Workshops' Director, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I've spent my entire career developing and honing unorthodox, highly effective strategies to turn around even the most negative student you work with.

The most important thing to realize is that no one changes their attitude because someone else thinks that would be a good idea. If you directly ask students to change their attitude, that's fine, but it probably hasn't been working very well. The strategies below avoid the failure rate that mere words can produce when it comes to trying to generate student attitude adjustments. Notice that all of these student attitude adjustment strategies do not rely primarily on words, but take more indirect approaches. The use of this style of approach means that you are placing a light bulb over the students' head but letting the student pull the cord to turn it on. If you pull the cord for the student, then really the only option left for many of them is to fight back and resist. Using less direct methods means that most of the time, the student with the negative attitude, won't always immediately default to being resistant or oppositional.

The next time you consider just telling a student to improve their attitude, remember that the adult equivalent is being told to lose weight or stop drinking. That image may be a very useful reminder to minimize your reliance on verbiage and to increase your use of more indirect approaches that don't generate resistance.

teacher workshopIf you want more than the sampling of strategies offered here, consider coming to our Seattle Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop on May 4-5, 2017. Right now, we have have two completely free work-study scholarships to give away. Grab one of these awesome no-fee workshop registration slots before they are all taken. Call 1.800.545.5736 to quickly sign up. You'll learn 200 powerhouse strategies for whatever student behavior, attitude and social problems you name.

 

Students' Negative Attitude-Buster Strategies
 

student bad attitude posterUse Passive Intervention Strategies

to Improve Students' Bad Attitudes

Poster #314, shown at right, is the perfect, low effort strategy to chip away at students' bad attitudes. It may appear that the student is just staring at the wall but Poster #314 could be eating away at them slowly day by day. You don't need to buy the poster. You can make your own, or have a student whose behavior warrants a consequence, make a version of the image shown here. Either way, students can't argue with a poster. Nor, can students unsee what they read. Your message was delivered– and probably more rapidly than if verbiage had been the sole method. With this passive intervention strategy, you've planted a seed that may gradually begin to grow over time. This tactic is most definitely not a quick cure, but part of an on-going effort that can ultimately produce results.

 

Use Strategies That Show the Benefits

of Attitude Improvement

If people are going to change, it's because they see a reason to change. Give your students a reason to improve their bad attitudes. Show students what's in it for them if they limit or improve their negative attitude. This approach can work very well with your more self-interested students who care mostly about what they can get for themselves. When the student is in a difficult situation, such as having done a minor bit of problem behavior, encourage the youngster to "Keep 1 Problem to 1, Not Turn 1 Problem Into 2." Since this strategy shows students what they get for themselves by evidencing a less negative attitude, this approach can be hard to resist. It is, in essence, showing students that their negative attitude is like the old adage about biting your tongue to spite your face. The more you can link a more positive attitude to the student getting more of what they say they want, the more progress you may make improving the negativity. It's almost like you are marketing and selling a more positive attitude like it was a brand of jeans or cell phone.

 

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student attitude posterUse Strategies That Un-Normalize

Students' Bad Attitudes

At many schools, having a sulky, negative, oppositional attitude is considered normal. Consider working to get that rather bad standard to be different. Poster #574 (shown at right) gives you some words to do that. It can start or further the process of helping your students understand that being nasty or mean or difficult is not a life plan that will work. You can also help students to identify all the jobs and businesses that people can succeed in if you are really unkind to those around you. Most students realize that there are few or no jobs where abusive behavior is tolerated, and that ultimately having a really negative attitude will be a potential obstacle and impediment throughout life. You are again selling the idea of a more positive attitude as benefiting the student with the negative attitude. Us humans are often pretty self-interested and that makes this strategy a good candidate to use if you want to transform the bad attitudes you see in your classroom or around your school or program. Using the phrase shown on the poster, "healthy humans don't destroy other humans" is a great phrase to use regularly as it can impact some students who will find the words unsettling.

 

Use Inspirational Strategies

to Improve Students' Bad Attitudes

Some students are impacted by pretty sayings and inspirational words. For your students who have negative attitudes, but might respond to inspiring words of wisdom, consider using this phrase, or creating a poster of the words for your walls. The phrase is "Live each moment as if you chose it." These words are going to be especially useful for students who are sullen and negative in specific settings, such as P.E. class or when there is an exam announced. Because the phrase is provocative and worth further thought, some students may actually stop and consider what it means since it's meaning is not necessarily obvious. It is difficult to resist words that you haven't yet figured out, making this strategy a winner. In the instant that the student grasps the phrase's meaning, you actually delivered a bit of insight to the youngster. It can be one step on the long progression of improving that student's attitude in your classroom and school.

 

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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

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    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Strategies to Motivate Unmotivated Students

 

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Strategies to Motivate Unmotivated Students

Includes Free, Printable, Motivational Classroom Poster

 
 

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$8 0h Wow! Behavior Change & Motivational Posters

 

Student motivation can sag as everyone returns from the holidays and heads into the long stretch until Spring Break. If your students' motivation has dropped with the temperatures, here are some lively and very effective motivational methods that are sure to fire up interest, enthusiasm and focus on school and education. The assortment includes a free printable motivational speakerclassroom motivational poster that has received lots of comments. Many educators find it to be an eye-opening, effective way to build motivation in students who are unmotivated, discouraged, bored, frustrated or lacking confidence.

Happy New Year from all of us here at Youth Change Professional Development Workshops, and a special shout-out from me, Youth Change's director, Ruth Herman Wells. I hope I will be seeing lots of you this year at our 2017 general session professional development workshops, and at the conferences, schools and agencies all over North America where I will be leading workshops or providing keynotes. Please come up and say "hi." It is always so wonderful to get to meet our Problem Kid Problem-Solver magazine subscribers in person so be sure to come down front to say hello. If you have a bad budget but want to attend our general session workshops coming to Seattle on May 4-5, 2017 or Portland, Oregon on October 12-13, 2017, we have scholarship slots open for both events. A quick call to 1.800.545.5736 is all it takes to grab one.

strategies to motivate

 

Motivational Strategies

for the Most Unmotivated Students

 

poster motivates unmotivated studentsMOTIVATIONAL STRATEGY

Replace Missing Motivation with

Artificial Motivation


Few teachers have ever taken a class called Motivate the Most Unmotivated Students, but most teachers probably wish they had. Typically, many teachers see a plethora of unmotivated students when they look out at their class. Typically, most teachers don't feel like they have a plethora of awesome motivational methods to improve the situation. This article is going to change that a bit for the better.

You may not be aware that you can actually build motivation for school, education and class work. Initially, you should start the process of building motivation by relying on external items that are already very liked by students. Think of it this way. You can initially use a "carrot" to lead student to Literature, Algebra or History class, and once you've gotten and held their attention, you can reduce the reliance on external positives. It is sad that some families don't reliably teach their children the importance of school, but like any other area that is being overlooked in a child's life, teachers may be the ones to have to fill in the gap. That is certainly true here, but the good news is that improving a child's motivation is a lot easier than (figuratively) dragging a kid to school and forcing them to learn– which is what the situation may feel like now.

Money is a very effective external item that can serve to engage many unmotivated students to care more about school, class and education. Yes, ideally, children would come to love reading Hemingway, or find early American history enthralling, but money makes a great "hook" to start to transform how students view education. In the meantime, you are going to have to market school, classes and education like they were a pair of way cool jeans or a new iPad. You're going to be working to convince students that school is the only path to many of the things they very much need, want or value…which brings us back to money.

Our popular motivational poster, Poster #471 (shown above) does a great job of marketing school and education by linking them to something most students care a lot about: money. It shows students what they "earn" every second, minute, hour, day, month and year they spend in school. This poster is based on the belief that high school grads earn approximately $330,000 more per lifetime so it reflects life expectancy and earnings stats.

You can print this eye-catching, motivational school poster for free and post it in your classroom, or the hallways of your school. You can download the free motivational poster here. Feel free to share it with your colleagues. Obviously, one motivational strategy can't fix all the boredom, disinterest and yawns, but it's a terrific first step. You can find thousands more motivational strategies throughout our website, and another great motivational strategy further below in this article. You can use our site search engine to search for more "motivational strategies." Most strategies are free but you will find many in our books, in person professional development workshops and online courses too.

Yes, this "artificial" motivation may not start off being nearly as beneficial and reliable as the real thing, but now that you may have your students considering the possibility that school just might be important to them, while you have their attention, you can help them discover what they could love in the world of education.

 

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student

 

MOTIVATIONAL STRATEGY

Learn What to Do About

Work Refusers


Some students don't start off unmotivated– but they sure end up that way. Among other university training classes that most teachers haven't taken but may wish that they had is Work Refusers 101. Some of your youngsters become so discouraged or frustrated by school that they stop working altogether or do as little school work as they possibly can get away with. Often, these are very well-intentioned students who have learned over time that doing nothing seems a lot less painful than taking a test or completing a homework assignment. Since teachers often have little real-world training or tested strategies for work refusers, these youngsters can quickly become a nightmare to teach. They may appear to be your most unmotivated student since they do so little actual school work, and require constant help to complete almost any academic task.

Here's the secret to successfully engaging your work refusers in school: They are not necessarily unmotivated. They can have great motivation but the child has simply learned that shutting down and doing nothing seems to yield better results than taking action. In your Psychology classes, this pattern was described as Freeze, Flight or Fight. Work refusers camp out in Freeze. That makes these students seem passive-aggressive or oppositional when really they just freeze and have trouble moving beyond that. To best understand, look back in your life for a time you crawled into bed and wouldn't come out. It may have been after a traumatic experience or a romantic setback or a job loss, and for you, a short-term thing– but for these students, freezing up has become a long term, entrenched pattern.

So, motivational methods will only take you so far with this population. And, as you may have noticed, it is so easy to get caught in a power struggle with them. So there's what won't work. Here comes what will work: step-by-step, slow transition from doing nothing to gradually doing something. So, if the student typically does two paragraphs of handwriting, maybe we aim for two paragraphs and one more sentence. The next step might be two paragraphs of handwriting and two sentences…and so on. The steps need to be tiny and when the student balks at a step, consider dropping back a bit and carefully observing for anxiety. When this student's anxiety goes up, their work production goes down. Over time, you will learn to calibrate their work load with their anxiety. The more you can create a cooperative team feeling while avoiding increasing their anxiety, the more work you will ultimately get out of this youngster.

We devote entire classes to teaching about work refusers so we are just skimming the surface here for what you can do, but we thought it was important that you realize that the student who may look the most unmotivated, can be much more accurately viewed as a child rife with anxiety issues.

 

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    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
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The 5 Best Classroom Management Hacks

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

The 5 Best Classroom Management Hacks

 
 

 

classroom managementDid you know that you can avoid many classroom management problems before they start?

Happy New School Year from me, Youth Change Professional Development Workshops Director, Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I have spent most of my life writing books, creating posters and leading workshops to help teachers figure out what to do when classroom management has become a serious problem. Let me show you how to skip the back-to-school pitfalls that can make teaching so frustrating and exasperating for the next 9 months. These effective, must-do classroom management hacks are time-tested and teacher approved to work better than conventional approaches.

Youth Change Workshops cares about you and your students so if you need more help, we have our Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshop coming up soon in Portland on October 13-14, 2016. If you have a bad budget, scholarships are still available by calling 1.800.545.5736. You'll leave the workshop with 200 solutions for the classroom management problems you name at the start of our first day so you're guaranteed to get solutions for your exact students and their exact problems.

 

Top 5

Classroom Management

Hacks

 

classroom management articles1. Start Strong
    Because There Are No Do-Overs

No student will ever fight back or complain if you start out the school year being a very strong disciplinarian and then decide to loosen up a bit. However, if you start off being a weak or even moderate disciplinarian and decide later that you need to tighten up…well, good luck with that.

It is so hard to tighten up classroom management and so easy to loosen up. It always amazes me that this central premise isn't the foundation of every teacher's classroom management game plan.

Having spent my whole career helping educators tighten up problematic class management, I really can appreciate that it can feel like battle to re-invent a classroom once an unsatisfactory atmosphere has developed. It's almost like the classroom gets branded as a free-for-all. That's why I sometimes have to recommend that an existing classroom be "discontinued" instead of trying to wage an uphill battle to turnaround that negative perception. So, if you do find yourself fighting serious classroom management battles, it is better to start completely over. You can even re-name your classroom, redo the layout and make other cosmetic changes to emphasize that "Room 256" is gone and now this is "Beyond Room 256" or similar. Re-starting works best at natural break times like the end of a term or after a holiday break.

However, there's a caveat to this remodeling plan: If you tell your students that "things are going to be different," you better deliver. You'll still get challenged and tested and if you don't satisfactorily manage the challenges and tests, expect things to return to the way they were. If you don't satisfactorily manage what the students throw your way in your "new" classroom, it will become even harder to engineer the classroom conditions you need to teach. That means if you do create a "new" classroom, make sure you have acquired the skills, attitude, motivation, mentoring and backing you need to guarantee that your "new" classroom will be "new and improved," not just "new" but with the same old problems.

 

classroom management article2. Establish Rules
    In a Way That Ensures Compliance

Remember when they put that new stop sign in by your house? Remember how mad you were that you didn't even get a say about it and now you have to live with it? You thought to yourself: "Yesterday, I just rolled through here and today, I want to just roll through here." Wouldn't you have felt better about the new sign and complying with it, if you'd at least had some input into the decision to install it? Sure, and the same logic applies to your students.

When students arrive at the first day of school and are told that they need to follow this rule and that rule and this rule, they react a lot like you did when you thought about cruising through the new stop sign. What if you allowed students to help shape the rules? Well, the answer to that question is that you'd have the same set of rules but far better compliance.

On the first day of school, start with a classroom with no rules and let students take turns role-playing the job of teacher. Give a great prize in lieu of a paycheck. To earn the prize, the role play teachers just have to teach the other students to memorize a five digit number. Sounds so easy, doesn't it? Yes, but, this is a classroom with no rules. The other students can talk at will, leave the class at will, pop bubble gum, and so on. The role play teacher will soon become frustrated. When that happens, offer the role play teacher the opportunity to create rules and let the student attach his or her own name to the rules. For example, "Juan's No Cussing Rule." The rules are now things created by your students and their names are attached to them.

Students are far less likely to hassle or trash the rules that they invented and bear their names. This is a slam-dunk easy way to build in excellent classroom management and discipline from the first ring of the first bell.
 

classroom management3. Teach Behavior, Attitude and Motivation

     Before You Expect Them

Few teachers would expect math or reading skills before anyone taught them to students, but many teachers do expect students to start the school year with appropriate behavior, a good attitude and ample motivation. Sadly, those expectations are often not realistic in our contemporary time. Years ago, parents more reliably taught their offspring to behave acceptably, have a reasonable attitude and sufficient motivation. That is not always the case now. That means if you want to work with properly behaved, motivated students who have good attitudes, you are going to have to teach that. You can expect anything you want, but if you haven't taught it to the child– and no one else has taught it to the child either– then you are often going to be disappointed.

There are thousands of lively, effective methods to teach students to have acceptable behavior, attitude and motivation. Take a look at some step-by-step, how-to guides that are in our archive of past "Classroom Management Strategies" articles.

The bottom line is that good classroom management is predicated on students using proper behavior, and having adequate motivation and attitude. If you want good classroom management, you need to teach students to do their part. It is difficult– perhaps even impossible– to have good classroom management with students who are chronically badly behaved, unmotivated and have negative attitudes. If you want to change what you see in your classroom, start by training your students to look, act and sound like successful students.

Article Continues Below

 

 

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Schedule Your On-Site Inservice Workshop Now

It's More Affordable Than You Think

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student classroom management4. Proactively Identify and
    Manage Problem-Starters 

There's always at least one, isn't there? There's always at least one student in every classroom who seems to start the fires and feed them once they're started. Identify this student on Day 1 and immediately develop an effective plan to manage him or her. If you wait until this student is in trouble for misbehavior, it's too late as these youngsters are often pretty cagey and slick– even at a young age– and can be master manipulators of both students and adults.

Even more important, you need to know that one-size-fits-all discipline techniques fit no one, and that is part of why this student can reign supreme on your turf. Just like you know 200 ways to teach spelling to fit each student, you need to know 200 ways to implement classroom management to fit each student. Often, your biggest trouble-maker doesn't respond to conventional, everyday discipline methods and behavior intervention strategies. You may have noticed that "nothing works" to control these seriously acting-out students. The amazing thing is that mental health and juvenile corrections staff have developed tailored techniques for the most extremely misbehaved youngsters, and have been successfully using these methods for generations. Even more amazing, most educators have not been offered these tested and researched techniques. The one exception to this statement is that special education teachers are sometimes fortunate to have been given training on how to manage the most extremely misbehaved children. These special educators may have been given some or a lot of practical training on how to manage students who have been given the mental health diagnosis of conduct disorder.

It is estimated that 11-14% of the population of children and teens have conduct disorder– whether diagnosed or not. The key thing here is that you can't use ordinary behavior management techniques with this population as those approaches always fail and usually make the problems worse. So, if you want to have the tools you need, the reality is that you need to upgrade your skills to include behavior management techniques designed for very acting-out students. We can help with that upgrade. You can rely on our site's free resources to learn classroom management methods designed to work more effectively with children with conduct disorder. These carefully tailored and researched interventions are going to work so much better than the generic methods that you're using now. There are lots of free articles on conduct disorder on our site. You can start by reading an introductory article on conduct disorder.

 We also have many live, online and on-site workshops on the topic. We also have books, ebooks and audio books that can quickly deliver these must-have tools so that you finally have the updated, targeted methods you need to rein in your most misbehaved, hard-to-manage students. You'll learn the reasons why you must work with the most misbehaved students by having many, ultra-high consequences; making sure that all interactions relate to what the student cares most about; making sure you know the student's most liked rewards and disliked sanctions; confronting all bad behavior every time; never giving second chances; drastically limiting discussion over sanctions and rule violations; maximizing supervision at all times; watching for set-ups; watching for manipulation, lies and delinquency, and if your boss and team permit, you need to stop being so fair.

The bottom line: If you can control your most misbehaved students and negative leaders, you're well on your way to controlling your entire classroom. 

 

classroom management for teachers5. Get Help Now

One of the top reasons that teachers quit is that they hate the state of their classroom management. Some teachers may improve on their own, but the vast majority of teachers who are living through a classroom management nightmare really need to acquire better tools and information. Since 80% of a typical teacher's training focused on academic content, it's not a surprise that classroom management can seem so daunting. Based on that percentage, one would expect that a typical teacher's day is dominated by content issues, but ask any educator and they will tell you that their day is dominated by students' behavioral, social and emotional problems– yet those are all areas given limited or no practical training in pre-service courses.

Severe or chronic classroom management problems are unlikely to change unless the teacher changes. If you've read this article looking for the way out of your classroom management war, the truth is that change isn't going to just happen. You are going to have to actively upgrade your skills and possibly, your personality style and demeanor. That's not to say that every teacher needs to have a loud and forceful personality, for instance– some of the best classroom managers are very quiet and laid back– but if students see you as an easy mark or easily fooled, some personal change may be required to combat that perception. That's why a mentor can be such a help. So, consider finding someone with great classroom management and a personality like yours– or what you wish your personality could be more like– and ask for help. While there is no substitute for upgrading your skill set to fit contemporary students, for some educators, tweaking their personality style and demeanor will also be necessary.

Students read us adults like open comic books. That means they sometimes know us and our weaknesses far better than we know ourselves. You may fool your boss, your co-workers and yourself, but you will almost never fool your students. So, it's incredibly important that you believe wholeheartedly that you can effectively manage difficult students. And, that's not something you can learn from a workshop. That's why upgrading your skills may need to be accompanied by finding a caring mentor who tells it like it is.

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    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


Professional Development: The Fastest Fix for Classroom Management Problems

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

Professional Development:

The Fastest Fix for

Classroom Behavior Management Problems


Includes FREE Classroom Management Online Course

 

 

teacher classroom managementDo you ever dread going into work because of serious, persistent classroom behavior management problems? If you're like many teachers, the focus of your day is not teaching academics. The truth is that much of your day may revolve around discerning how to best manage  defiant, disrespectful, apathetic, non-compliant, misbehaved, disruptive and rude students.

Hello from Youth Change Professional Development Workshops director, Ruth Herman Well, M.S. I'm going to explain both virtual and in-person professional development options and ease any confusion or apprehension you may be experiencing. After 25 years providing professional development to teachers, counselors, court workers and social workers, I think I'm getting to be an expert on the topic.

Years ago, you had to wait for a solution to discover how to best prevent and manage the worst classroom management problems. You could wait for an inservice workshop to come near you or you could hope that your school district scheduled a professional development inservice day that would provide answers. Now, you can access solutions immediately. The good news is that help is immediately available. The bad news is that it can be confusing trying to understand and locate all the newest professional development options for your specific classroom management issues. This article is going to quickly help clarify all of that.
 

Fast Teacher Professional Development Options

to Fix Classroom Management Problems
 

professional development courseOnline Professional Development Courses
 

Courses now can come to wherever you are. No more trudging out to a university classroom or a conference room. You can take most online courses in your classroom at school or while you are home or at the gym.

Online courses come in different types. You may prefer one format over another. Most commonly, online courses are videos that operate just like a YouTube video. You can start, stop, pause and replay them at will. Normally, online courses play on most electronic devices including smart phones, computers, tablets and laptops. Sometimes, online courses are PowerPoint presentations that you click through frame by frame, or the PowerPoint slide show may play like a video. Occasionally, online courses simply require that you read an online book or series of web pages. Typically, the online book is in PDF format.

Most online courses require that you take a test or quiz to receive clock hours, CEUs or college credit. Usually, the entire process is completed electronically. That means that your homework or quiz is completed and transmitted online, as is your certificate of completion or other documentation.

If you have never tried an online professional development course, here is your chance to try one free. This free online professional development workshop will give you immediate help to solve one of your worst classroom management problems: poor motivation.  Auditing this free online training class will help you get acquainted with newer professional development formats without spending any money. This sampling will show you how easy it is to immediately solve classroom management problems online with the right professional development course.

The free online course is called Maximum-Strength Motivation-Makers and is geared for teachers and counselors who work with elementary, middle and high school students. This online class is a PowerPoint presentation that plays like a video. Through February 25, 2016, you can watch the online class free– this link has been removed since it has expired. (Clock hours will not be available for this free online class but you can purchase the online course here to earn 1 clock hour if you wish. The free course will not be available after 2-25-16 when the link here will be disabled. This is a limited time opportunity.) If you read this article after the link has expired, you can consider taking a look at our many low cost online courses to help you better prevent and manage K-12 classroom management concerns. You can view all of Youth Change's online professional development courses for teachers and counselors.

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Schedule Your On-Site Inservice Workshop Now

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Working with Difficult Students
Doesn't Have to Be So Difficult

100s of Solutions for Work Refusers, Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated and Withdrawn Students

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teacher professional development Professional Development Webinar
 

A webinar is an online professional development course that happens live. This term confuses a lot of people because live webinars are often recorded and then offered later as pre-recorded online courses that play like a video. Both the live and pre-recorded formats can provide you quick help to prevent or stop classroom management dilemmas.

In a live webinar, the course streams live to people who are scattered around the world, the country, state, city, school district or school. Everyone is hearing and seeing the same content at the same time. Communication can be two way, meaning that participants can talk to the instructor and ask questions or make comments. If the webinar is being viewed by a large number of people, there is often a moderator who will arrange for the questions to be posed and answered at pre-set times. Or, questions sometimes are answered right when they are posed.

It is necessary to have special software, or to use a special web platform to present or participate in a webinar. Participants watch on their computer screen, tablet, smart phone or TV screen after logging on. The presenter can be seen teaching, or slides, video or other content can be shown on the screen at other times. Participants are not usually recorded visually, but questions can be offered verbally and that verbiage recorded. Often, questions are typed by the participant and the moderator verbally communicates the question to the presenter and the audience.

Participants can enroll individually or as a group, so an entire school staff could all watch a webinar together. Absent staff could eventually view the recorded webinar. This option can ensure that even absent staff members receive the same professional development training. Webinars can focus on any topic and when presented to a single school or district, for example, they can quickly target a top classroom management issue and zero in on solutions that will be heard by the entire school or district staff. View Youth Change's professional development webinars.

 

online professional development coursesIn-Person and On-Site Professional Development
 

In-person and on-site professional development workshops are still available to solve classroom management problems. No virtual format can compare with face to face contact and actually meeting and experiencing a presenter. In-person professional development allows for individuation in a way that virtual formats don't. Participants can ask privately about delicate situations, something that would be problematic during electronic instruction.

A common complaint about virtual professional development for teachers is that it is hard to focus and concentrate. When a teacher participates in a webinar or online course, it is easy to be distracted by the usual work problems. When a teacher travels to a conference or the school closes for inservice training, the distractions are usually greatly reduced.

Virtual professional development isn't always customizable. Pre-recorded online courses are not customizable at all. Live courses, whether on-site or in general session, can be completely customizable. For example, our live courses always begin with participants naming the student behavior problems that they wish to cover during the workshop. Live webinars can be similarly customized. Youth Change's next live workshops are coming soon to Seattle and Portland. Find information on those live workshops here. You can register 2 for 1 until 5-4-16. Scholarships are also offered by calling 503-982-4220.

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    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


    Behavior & Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog Articles

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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
    http://www.youthchg.com | 1.503.982.4220 | 275 N. 3rd St; Woodburn, OR 97071
    © Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved | Permission granted to forward magazine to others.


The Best Teacher Classroom Management Strategies, Methods & Techniques

 

teacher classroom management blog

 

The Best Teacher Classroom Management Strategies,
Methods and Techniques

 

 

 

 

Several of the great classroom management strategies included in this Behavior and Classroom Management Problem-Solver Blog article were given to us by participants in our Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Youth Workshops, but the names of the participants have long since become separated from these terrific ideas.

classroom management strategiesHello from Breakthrough Strategies Professional Development Workshop instructor Ruth Herman Wells, M.S. I guess I'm the one to blame for stealing these terrific classroom management strategies and techniques, but the important thing is that these great methods are being passed onto teachers and counselors who need them to maximize their impact on misbehaved, troubled and problem students.

So, if you are one of our former course participants now reading an idea that you mentioned in class, let me apologize for borrowing your inspiration. Our Breakthrough Strategies Workshop has always been a collection of the best teacher classroom management methods that exist. The source of these inspired classroom management methods is not as important as disseminating these gems to benefit students who are struggling.
 

Classroom management strategies for teachersClassroom Management Strategies

4 of the Best
 

1. WAIVER OF MY RIGHTS

Classroom Management Strategy
 

As shown below, this classroom management intervention is geared for teachers and schools, but if you will simply alter a few key words from the school-based example below, you can easily make this device work at your Job Corps, foster home, treatment center, etc. This intervention is designed to be used with children and youth who feel that your service is a waste of time.

Remember: You must judge this and every other behavior and classroom management intervention that we offer to see if it fits your students, your locale, etc. The intervention below is not suitable for all students. You can also consider editing to make it gentler. To get a broader array of methods, consider coming to our professional development inservice workshops or buying some of our books. Our workshops and books flood you with a vast assortment of counselor and teacher behavior management methods, rather than the small handful of techniques offered here.
 

Waiver of My Rights

I, _____ hereby give up my constitutional right to a free education.

I give up the right to have a high-paying job forever.

I do not want to be a partner in my own success.

Signed,
_________________

 

2. THINK ABOUT IT

Classroom Management Strategy
 

Other than not being a very good sentence, this next device may be a great thing to say to impulsive youngsters: "You can't think yourself out of what you acted yourself into." Then work with them to think first, act second.
 

3. MAKE A WHINE LIST

Classroom Management Strategy
 

Some days, a girl's just gotta gripe. Boys too. The next "black Monday," when all attitudes seem to be dreary and whiny, here is a fun student behavior change activity that can turn it around. If you're a teacher, this may be an activity that you can relate to writing, art, or reading.

You can choose one of the following versions of this classroom management strategy. One choice: Let your students make a Whine List of all their complaints, and get the complaining out of their systems.

This second version of the intervention is just so amazingly cute– and even better, this classroom management strategy is incredibly effective too: Have your students devise a menu for a restaurant called The Irri-Table, and then create dishes that fit the mood. For example, the main course might be crab in whine sauce. You may want to follow this activity with a discussion of what happens to crabby employees in the work place, and assist students to develop plans to moderate their attitudes on the next black Monday.

Article Continues Below

 

 

teacher workshop

 

Schedule Your On-Site Professional Development Now

It's More Affordable Than You Think

Learn 100s of Strategies for Work Refusers, Violent,
Uncontrollable, Unmotivated and Withdrawn Students

1.800.545.5736 or Email

One Click Can Solve It All

 

 

Article Continues Here

 

teacher classroom management strategies4. WHAT STUDENTS WANT

Classroom Management Strategy


It may be useful to note what students often say they want from their teachers and counselors. It may not be what you think. Some surveys have shown that students don't ask for less work, longer lunch or more days off. So what do they want? They want their teachers and counselors to believe in them. That thought can guide you.

Research, reported in Education Week on 9-3-03, notes that when youth professionals "pay attention to students' social and emotional development, children do better academically." I have to admit that the top complaint we get in our workshops from teachers is that they are sickened by what they overhear in neighboring classrooms or in the hall.

At a school here in our town, a boy named Len teetered towards dropping out. Then, starting with the new school year, Len was assigned a math teacher who belittled Len and called him names on a daily basis. Soon, Len started coming in late for math, then he skipped math entirely. Eventually, he stopped showing up at all. Says a former classmate: "In the 12 years I shared classes with him, I watched many teachers try unsuccessfully to make it better for Len, but I will always remember the one teacher who successfully made it worse."

Use this story to motivate yourself to always make school a haven and never more torment for troubled and struggling students.

 Teacher classroom management methods

LIKE THESE
CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES?

We have thousands more in our books, online professional development classes, classroom management posters and counselor and teacher training workshops. The smattering of strategies listed in this Behavior and Classroom Management blog article are just a few of the interventions we have to help you build a more productive year. View more of our unexpected, compelling behavior and classroom management strategies here. When you think of problem youth, think of Youth Change Workshops. Our intervention strategies will help you help your troubled and problem students succeed.

 

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    Reprint or Repost This Article
     

    Bring the Breakthrough Strategies Workshop to Your Site

    Help Unmotivated, Failing, Troubled and Unmanageable Students

    teachermissYou have students who struggle. We have solutions for students who struggle…so your job doesn’t have to be so difficult. We have cutting-edge strategies to manage group and classroom management problems like behavior disorders, trauma, disrespect, bullying, emotional issues, withdrawal, substance abuse, tardiness, cyberbullying, delinquency, work refusal, defiance, depression, Asperger’s, ADHD and more.

     

    Schedule the Breakthrough Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled Workshop to come to your site. This is the one professional development inservice that produces results, results, results. Call 1.800.545.5736 now. This surprisingly affordable inservice also makes a terrific fund raiser. College credit and 10 professional development clock hours are available. Your staff will finally have the more effective, real-world tools they need to work with today’s challenging, difficult youth.

     

    Contact us now, and begin solving your worst “kid problems” today. Call 1.800.545.5736, or email.

     

    Working with Troubled Students Doesn’t Have to be So Difficult
     


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    Library of Congress ISSN: 1526-9981 | Youth Change, Your Problem-Kid Problem-Solver
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